Sleep Apnea Types

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body (sequelae). In sleep apnea, your breathing stops or gets very shallow while you are sleeping. Each pause in breathing typically lasts 10 to 20 seconds or more. These pauses can occur 20 to 30 times or more an hour. Symptoms may be present for years, even decades without identification, during which time the sufferer may become conditioned to the daytime sleepiness and fatigue associated with significant levels of sleep disturbance. In adults, the most typical individual with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is obese, with particular heaviness at the face and neck. The hallmark symptom of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in adults is excessive daytime sleepiness. Typically, an adult or adolescent with severe long-standing obstructive sleep apnea will fall asleep for very brief periods in the course of usual daytime activities if given any opportunity to sit or rest. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body.

Sleep apnea is a common disorder that can be very serious. There are two distinct forms of sleep apnea: Central and Obstructive. Sleep apnea can cause high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease, memory problems, weight gain, impotency, and headaches. Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common category of sleep-disordered breathing. The prevalence of OSA among the adult population in western Europe and North America. The hallmark symptom of the disorder is excessive daytime sleepiness. Additional symptoms of sleep apnea include restless sleep, loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps), falling asleep during the day, morning headaches, trouble concentrating, irritability, forgetfulness, mood or behavior changes, anxiety, and depression. Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA). A more invasive surgery usually only tried in difficult cases where other surgeries have not relieved the patient's OSA. Apneas are usually measured during sleep (preferably in all stages of sleep) over a two-hour period.

Weight reduction and avoiding alcohol and sedatives may help some individuals. Surgery to remove excess tissue at the back of the throat , to remove enlarged tonsils or adenoids ,or to create an opening in the trachea to bypass the obstructed airway during sleep. Sleep Apnea in children where removing the tonsils or adenoids does not take care of the problem is usually treated with a C-PAP (continous positive airway pressure) or Bi-Level positive airway pressure. C-PAP is a machine that blows air into your nose via a nose mask, keeping the airway open and unobstructed. Bi-Level has an inspiratory pressure that is higher than the expiratory pressure. Some children have facial deformities that may cause the sleep apnea. Maxillomandibular advancement. In this procedure, the upper and lower part of your jaw is moved forward from the remainder of your face bones. Tracheostomy is used in persons with severe, life- threatening sleep apnea. Laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) is done to eliminate snoring but has not been shown to be effective in treating sleep apnea.

Sleep Apnea Treatment Tips

1. Behavioral Therapy-Is usually all that is needed for a mild case. It changes the person behavior towards the use of alcohol, tobacco which affects the airway.

2. Physical or Mechanical Therapy- The therapy provides air pressure to keep the airway from narrowing.

3. Surgery is considered only when other alternative therapy failed or if the patient volunteered to.

4. Avoid or at least limit alcohol intake.

5. Avoid or limit the use of tranquilizers, sleeping pills.

6. Avoid sleeping on your back.

7. Oxygen and medications may have adjunctive roles in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in some patients.

8. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, which removes excess tissue in the throat to make the airway wider.

9. Tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, which removes the tonsils and/or the adenoids.

10. Tracheostomy, which creates a hole in the windpipe (trachea). A tube is then put in the hole to bring air in.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are some books I can read to research the mental issues caused after a person has sleep apnea?
    I am doing an assignment on the mental conditions caused after a person is diagnosed with sleep apnea. This means what type of issues they mentally encounter as a result of sleep apnea (such as depression, changes the must do in their environment etc.) And I would like some literature to read and information that Sleep Apnea causes that most would not be aware to know about.

    • ANSWER:
      there are tons of sites dedicated to sleep ( after all you spend like 1/3 of your life doing it.)

      jsut google " sleep book"
      or "sleeping disorder"

      you will have more than you can read .

  2. QUESTION:
    How can you get a sleep apnea test done without any insurance?
    My fiance has sleep apnea and needs a sleep test done so that he can get the machine to help make it better. He has no insurance as he is out of work. We have been trying to find free sleep tests in Ohio but have had no luck.

    • ANSWER:
      alot of medical research companies have free testing for certain types of illnesses. Go to the NIH website. That is National Institue of Health. Or contact a medical school or a University hospital associated with one.

  3. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have sleep apnea and insomnia at the same time?
    I have been suffering with sleep apnea for months now. After waiting three stressful weeks for the machine to arrive, I used it but only managed to get 3 hours of sleep. I also noticed, that before I had the machine my average time spent sleeping decreased. Tonight I am fully awake and I cannot sleep at all. Is it possible to have sleep apnea and insomnia together? I have serious depression already, so I think that this is a logical explanation. What do I do?

    • ANSWER:
      Your not alone friend. I have both as you do and what I suggest is now that you have the machine, you go to your doctor and get a sleep aid that can be accompanied by an antihistamene. Let me tell you I am on Trazadone for sleep and hydroxyzine which is the antihistamene. Together they work wondurfully. Also you may be overweight which many are who have apnea. Try not to drink too much water and if you are getting up in the night to urinate often then ask your doctor for a diuretic which will reduce the overall body fluid in the body. You may want to look into the possibility of type 2 diabetes. Hope this helps. Hang in there it gets better.
      p.s. I am awake by choice as i was off yesterday catnapping all day in the rainy weather. Just so you don't ask yourself, Why is he not asleep then?" LOL

  4. QUESTION:
    How do you control your sleep apnea?
    Does taking naps make you sleep apnea worse or better> ??
    My husband has sleep apnea, mild to high condition. 28 years old, smoker, 20 lbs over weight, no significant excersize daily.
    What are some ways to help ruduce his tiredness, and also improve his condition??

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry this is long, but hopefully helpful.

      There are several things that can cause sleep apnea. There are three types: obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and mixed sleep apnea.
      A blockage or narrowing of the airways in your nose, mouth, or throat generally causes obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This usually occurs when the throat muscles and tongue relax during sleep and partially block the airway. Smoking can inflame the tissues of the throat increasing the risk of blockage. His weight can be a factor as well. This is the most common type.
      Central sleep apnea is caused by a dysfunction in the thalamus area of the brain and the mechanism that controls your breathing.
      Mixed apnea is a disorder that combines obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea. There is both obstruction of the air passages and dysfunction of the brain.
      Since there are different types and causes, for one to simply say "slim down and quit smoking and it will go away" is an ill informed response. While it is true that the situation could improve by doing this, it isn't always the answer. Your husband need to be diagnosed if he hasn't been already.
      the most common treatment for sleep apnea is the
      use of a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine. You have to have a prescription from your docotor to get one.
      Other treatments may include mouth pieces to keep the jaws aligned, medication to signal the mechanism to breathe, and/or surgery. Your doctor can discuss treatment options with you and your husband.
      Things you and your husband can do at home (remember that sleep apnea is serious and can lead to death, so work with your doc on these):
      Sew a pocket on the back of his pajama top and insert a tennis ball. This will help keep him from rolling on to his back.
      Raise the head of the bed (not with pillows, but with bricks under the legs of the bed frame) at least six inches.
      Try to avoid taking sedatives or drinking excessive amounts of alcohol. This can make the apnea worse and leave him more exhausted the next day.
      Taking naps, to my knowledge, doesn't affect the apnea itself, but can be disruptive of his regular sleep cycle. Sugar, caffine, and nicotine can too. It is important to try to keep a regular sleeping habit (going to bed and getting up at the same time everyday). I know this is probably hard for him since he doen't feel rested, but it will help the body learn when to rest at proper times.

      Hope the answered your question and was helpful. Again sorry so long.

  5. QUESTION:
    Are there any questions I should ask my doctor?
    I am going to the doctor soon. I don't exactly know what to ask and stuff. My sisters think I might have type 1 diabetes and sleep apnea. If you have sleep apnea or type 1 diabetes if you could tell me like what happens and if there's any questions or things I should ask or say to the doctor.

    • ANSWER:
      1. Should I check my blood sugar levels at home with a glucose monitor?

      2. What are my goals regarding blood sugar levels?

      3. What are the warning signs or symptoms that my blood sugars are too high?

      4. What are the warning signs or symptoms that my blood sugars are too low?

      5. How can I change my lifestyle and diet in a way that will be healthy?

      6. What are the side effects of my medications/insulin?

      7. Will I always need medications/insulin?

      8. What are the long-term complications of diabetes, and how can I avoid them?

      9. How do other factors such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure affect me if I have diabetes?

      10. How often should I be seeing my doctor to optimize my diabetes management?

  6. QUESTION:
    Has anyone heard of a different treatment for people who suffer with sleep apnea?
    Someone I work with heard about this new type of treatment that treats sleep apnea besides the CPAP that is a machine that continually keeps air flowing tthrough a mask that is worn. This new treatment, if there is such a thing is something else. This was second hand info so I'm not sure if this is right.

    • ANSWER:
      Is it the BiPap?

  7. QUESTION:
    will insurance pay for a membership to a gym?
    I am trying to lose weight so that I can better my health, and live a long life to see my son grow up. However my income isnt all that great, will Health insurance companies pay for a membership to a gym so that I can get better. I have obstructive sleep apnea, Type 2 Diabetes, High blood pressure, amongst other medical problems.

    • ANSWER:
      Some companies will especially if your insurance is from your employment. You have to check with the company. They don't usually pay for the whole thing but part of it. If you can't afford a gym and your insurance won't pay then start exercising on your own. You don't need a treadmill to walk. Check with your school district and see if they have swimming programs for adults. If you want to lose weight there are a lot of ways to do it if you are determined to better your health.

  8. QUESTION:
    How to wake someone with sleep apnea?
    My father has sleep apnea. His had about 5 attacks in the past. I know how to prevent it, and stuff. But I want to know what to do during an attack. I usually turn him around to his side. That's helped in the past, he slowly starts to come out of it. It usually takes him about 45 minutes.
    He does not use a CPAP or BIPAP machine.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello!

      If you say that he sleeps better after you turn him around, I have a very good news for your father. However, I don't know if he will accept it. Your father seems to have a mild or moderate sleep apnea. If he had a severe type, then even if you turn him on his side, his apnea episodes will not disappear.
      The good news is for patients with sleep apnea like your father: there is a new treatment for sleep apnea which is based on positional therapy.

      The treatment is much cheaper than a CPAP, and is effective in most of the cases (in patients with mild or moderate sleep apnea, please remember!). With this treatment there is no discomfort, pain, or whatever negative aspect you might say.

      Before rushing to buy the product , I suggest to read carefully the information from the website:

  9. QUESTION:
    What do they do during a pediatric sleep study?
    My 3 year old son is doing one in a couple of days because I think he has sleep apnea. They want us there at 2:30 in the afternoon. What do they do between then and bedtime, just lay in the hospital bed? I am trying to determine how necessary this really is, as I reallly dont want him to have to undergo any surgeries later (they didnt work for his father). What was your experience? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Electrodes and wires are usually attached to the head, face, chest, arms and legs. These electrodes can record brain waves, eye movement,facial tension, heart rate, respiratory rate and limb movement. A flow sensor is also placed on the nose to sense respiratory flow/effort.

      Some of the things looked for include:

      time takes to fall asleep
      time to reach rem sleep
      depth of sleep achieved
      how easy to arouse
      respiratory effort: does the child attempt to breath but some-
      thing blocks the effort or is there no attempt made
      limb movement that may arouse child
      etc.

      The patient is usually hooked up and allowed to fall asleep as usual. They may allow him to listen to music, watch tv or be read to for a while.

      Others have mentioned studies for Narcolepsy but that is a different type of diagnostic tool. The test for narcolepsy is a Multi sleep latency test. ( A Nap study). It sees how quickly someone can fall asleep. It's a little different from a polysomnogram (Sleep study) but is similar as far as the actual test procedure itself.

      I'm a Respiratory therapist who has just so happened to have had a few sleep studies myself. I had obstructive sleep apnea as a child and had to have my tonsils and adenoids removed. I was just diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea again and am currently using CPAP as treatment. I also have restless leg syndrome and a circadian rhythm disorder ( sleep wake cycle is messed up!) I just always thought I was naturally a "night owl" I can, however, vividly remember the waking up "paralyzed" as a child during my apnea episodes or waking up choking. I currently snore so loudly now, that I sometimes wake myself up during an apnea episode.

      So, please allow the test to be done, even if you decided not to go the surgery route. The test will help you make a better informed decision.

      Good luck!

  10. QUESTION:
    My husband had a sleep study done last night to determine if he has sleep apnea?
    He did not like the idea about using a CPAP mask. Is this the ONLY treatment for sleep apnea? If it is, will he have to use it for the rest of his life?

    Any body that uses something different? Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      i've done the research for you and i hope this will help..=)

      Treatment
      For milder cases of sleep apnea, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes such as losing weight or quitting smoking. If these measures don't improve your signs and symptoms or if your apnea is moderate to severe, a number of other treatments are available. Certain devices can help open up a blocked airway. In other cases, surgery may be necessary.

      Treatments for obstructive sleep apnea may include:

      Therapies

      Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). If you have moderate to severe sleep apnea, you may benefit from a machine that delivers air pressure through a mask placed over your nose while you sleep. With CPAP (SEE-pap), the air pressure is somewhat greater than that of the surrounding air, and is just enough to keep your upper airway passages open, preventing apnea and snoring.

      Although CPAP is a preferred method of treating sleep apnea, some people find it cumbersome or uncomfortable. With some practice, most people learn to adjust the tension of the straps to obtain a comfortable and secure fit. You may need to try more than one type of mask to find one that's comfortable. Some people also benefit from using a humidifier along with their CPAP system.

      Don't just stop using the CPAP machine if you experience problems. Check with your doctor to see what modifications can be made to make you more comfortable. Additionally, contact your doctor if you are still snoring despite treatment or begin snoring again. If your weight changes, the pressure settings may need to be adjusted.

      Oral appliances. Another option is wearing an oral appliance designed to keep your throat open. CPAP is more effective than oral appliances, but oral appliances may be easier for you to use.Some are designed to open your throat by bringing your jaw forward, which can sometimes relieve snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnea.

      A number of devices are available from your dentist. You may need to try different devices before finding one that works for you. Once you find the right fit, you'll still need to follow up with your dentist at least every six months during the first year and then at least once a year after that to ensure that the fit is still good and to reassess your signs and symptoms.

      Surgery or other proceduresThe goal of surgery for sleep apnea is to remove excess tissue from your nose or throat that may be vibrating and causing you to snore, or that may be blocking your upper air passages and causing sleep apnea. Surgical options may include:
      Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP). During this procedure, your doctor removes tissue from the rear of your mouth and top of your throat. Your tonsils and adenoids usually are removed as well. This type of surgery may be successful in stopping throat structures from vibrating and causing snoring. However, it may be less successful in treating sleep apnea because tissue farther down your throat may still block your air passage. UPPP usually is performed in a hospital and requires a general anesthetic.
      Maxillomandibular advancement. In this procedure, the upper and lower part of your jaw is moved forward from the remainder of your face bones. This enlarges the space behind the tongue and soft palate, making obstruction less likely. This procedure may require the cooperation of an oral surgeon and an orthodontist, and at times may be combined with another procedure to improve the likelihood of success.
      Tracheostomy. You may need this form of surgery if other treatments have failed and you have severe, life-threatening sleep apnea. In this procedure, your surgeon makes an opening in your neck and inserts a metal or plastic tube through which you breathe. You keep the opening covered during the day. But at night you uncover it to allow air to pass in and out of your lungs, bypassing the blocked air passage in your throat.

      Removing tissues in the back of your throat with a laser (laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty) or with radiofrequency energy (radiofrequency ablation) are procedures that doctors sometimes use to treat snoring. However, these procedures aren't recommended for treating obstructive sleep apnea.

      Other types of surgery may help reduce snoring and sleep apnea by clearing or enlarging air passages:
      Nasal surgery to remove polyps or straighten a crooked partition between your nostrils (deviated nasal septum)
      Surgery to remove enlarged tonsils or adenoids

      Treatments for central sleep apnea are more limited and may include:
      Treatment for associated medical problems. Possible causes of central sleep apnea include heart or neuromuscular disorders, and treating those conditions may help. For example, optimizing therapy for heart failure may eliminate central sleep apnea.
      Supplemental oxygen. Using supplemental oxygen while you sleep may help if you have central sleep apnea. Various forms of oxygen are available as well as different devices to deliver oxygen to your lungs.
      Continuous positive airway pressure. This method, also used in obstructive sleep apnea, involves wearing a pressurized mask over your nose while you sleep. The mask is attached to a small pump that forces air through your airway to keep it from collapsing. CPAP may eliminate snoring and prevent sleep apnea. As with obstructive sleep apnea, it's important that you use the device as directed. If your mask is uncomfortable or the pressure feels too strong, talk with your doctor so that adjustments can be made.
      Bilevel positive airway pressure (bilevel PAP). Unlike CPAP, which supplies steady, constant pressure to your upper airway as you breathe in and out, bilevel PAP builds to a higher pressure when you inhale and decreases to a lower pressure when you exhale. The goal of this treatment is to boost the weak breathing pattern of central sleep apnea. Some bilevel PAP devices can be set to automatically deliver a breath if the device detects you haven't taken a breath after so many seconds.
      Adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV). This more recently approved airflow device is designed to treat central sleep apnea and complex sleep apnea. The device learns your normal breathing pattern and stores the information into a built-in computer. After you fall asleep, the machine uses pressure to normalize your breathing pattern and prevent pauses in your breathing.

  11. QUESTION:
    What health problems are needed in order to qualify for gastric bypass surgery?
    What types of health problems are needed to qualify to have gastric bypass surgery? Do you only qualify if you have severe health problems caused by this or could you qualify if you have smaller health problems like knee arthritis & breathing problems? Most of my family is obese and have heart disease, sleep apnea. Would they take that into consideration? My sister had gastric bypass surgery with a starting weight at 208 and is down to 128. I don't think she had any medical problems due to her obesity.

    • ANSWER:
      Generally insurance (if it is covered on your policy, some exclude) require a BMI (body mass index) of 40 or above without comorbidities and a 35 BMI with. Common comorbidities are diabetes, sleep apnea, high blood pressure, GERD, there are lots more. Many conditions are resolved soon after or immediately following surgery. I had gastric bypass surgery in 2006 (I was a self pay, best gift I ever gave myself) I've documented my weight loss www.theworldaccordingtoeggface.com you are welcome to check it out.

  12. QUESTION:
    What health problems are needed in order to qualify for gastric bypass surgery?
    What types of health problems are needed to qualify to have gastric bypass surgery? Do you only qualify if you have severe health problems caused by this or could you qualify if you have smaller health problems like knee arthritis & breathing problems? Most of my family is obese and have heart disease, sleep apnea. Would they take that into consideration? My sister had gastric bypass surgery with a starting weight at 208 and is down to 128. I don't think she had any medical problems due to her obesity.

    • ANSWER:
      Usually you have to have a BMI (Body Mass Index) of 40 or more to qualify for gastric bypass. If you have a BMI of over 35, sometimes you can qualify if you have significant co-morbidities such as diabetes or sleep apnea. First and foremost, "they" look at how morbid obesity is affecting you, however, your family history may be taken into account, if close relatives are morbidly obese and have health problems relating to obesity.

  13. QUESTION:
    Where can I learn about the different types of SnoreGuards?
    I want to know what the different types of Snoreguards are. My dentist tells me there are more than one type. Snoreguards are an alternative to the use of CPAP machines in the care of Sleep Apnea.

    • ANSWER:
      Google it

  14. QUESTION:
    How to relieve pressure on my lower back? And what is the best way to get better sleep?
    My question is how do I relieve pressure on my lower back? Also what is the best sleeping position? I noticed when I go to sleep I sleep better on my stomach, but the problem is the lower back starts to sink and it causes me to have back pain in the morning. Then when I try sleeping on my side I can't even fall asleep and if I sleep on my back I get sleep apnea episodes. I am trying to find a way so I can sleep better without any interruptions so that does incluses mattress and pillows. Anyone know what I can do?

    • ANSWER:
      Well if your having episodes of apnea, you need to tell your doctor so you can have a sleep study done. They may prescribe a C-pap device for you to sleep with at night. this would help greatly at night in relieving the apnea. This would allow you to sleep on your back, then you could try raising your legs on pillows or a cushion of some type. This will allow your lower back to drop into better alignment and be more straight during the night. This is probably why you sleep better on your stomach. Your apnea is reduced. Good luck...

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the best mask to use for sleep apnea?
    I understand their are newer versions of sleep masks to use for sleep apnea suffers. Any information

    • ANSWER:
      I think the best mask for you would depend on what you can tolerate having on your face.

      There are 3 different types of masks for CPAP's: Full face masks, nasal masks and nasal pillows.

      In my opinion the best full face mask out there is a Resmed Ultra Mirage, or a Resmed Mirage Quattro. The reason I feel that they are the best if because of the ease of removal. They have clips in the front of the mask versus some of the other brands that just use a ball and hook closure method. Full face masks are great if you don't have facial hair, and you sleep with your mouth open (which CPAP doesn't always alleviate), or if you have frequent sinus problems that keep your nose clogged. The down side to them is that if you toss and turn a lot they are hard to keep a seal with. If you are claustrophobic at all- then you wouldn't like a full face mask.

      Nasal masks are good for patients who want a mask that isn't nearly as much a hassle as full face masks. They don't cover as much of your face, and you can use them with a chin strap if you have a problem keeping your mouth closed. There are several good ones, but my favorite would have to be a Comfortgel. The ring that touches your face is made of gel, and according to my patients is comfortable. The down side is that that gel breaks down pretty quickly, and the mask needs to be replaced about every 6 months. A good alternative is a Comfort Fusion. The ring is made out of silicone, and can be replaced without having to get a whole new mask.

      The hottest item available now is called a nasal pillow. There are several brands out there, but my favorite (and the favorite of my patients) is called an Optilife Nasal Pillow. This mask has 2 small straps that come down the side of your face, a built in chin strap, and small pillows that fit inside your nose. It's lightweight, great if you toss and turn- and doesn't cover much of your face at all. Another couple of nasal pillows that are out there- and are worthless- are the Resmed "Swift" nasal pillows, and the Breeze Sleep Gear. Don't waste your time on those!

      There are some new forms of masks out there as well. One is called a Resmed Mirage Liberty. It has nasal pillows, and a mask that covers your mouth all in one piece. I'm not really fond of them, but I do know that they are available.

      Whatever you decide on, make sure that it's comfortable. If you don't like your mask you won't use your machine, and there are lots of options available through most DME companies. I would ask to speak to one of their Respiratory Therapists since the RT's will know the most about your choices. Good luck to you!

  16. QUESTION:
    Why do I hold my breath when I sleep?
    I know many will say "sleep apnea" and maybe it is a type of sleep anea, but if it is, its not the "obstructive" type. I don't snore. Its not like tissue is blocking my airway. Its more like I take a deep breath and then just hold it for a while. I do this over and over. I can remember doing it in my sleep right after I wake. I think it may be due to some type of anxiety. I'm afraid this is going to kill brain cells.

    • ANSWER:
      There are two main types of sleep apnea, OSA and CSA, Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Central Sleep Apnea. Central sleep apnea basically means your brain is not sending all the signals telling your lungs to breath. During my sleep studies, I've and a couple of CSA's along with a slew of OSA's. You can have OSA's without snoring, your tongue can slide back, your throat can relax in such a way as to block the airway. It holds true that if you have very loud snoring, you probably have sleep apnea, the reverse is not true, not snoring doesn't mean you don't have sleep apnea. A sleep study is the only way to know.

  17. QUESTION:
    Will a cpap machine improve the health of someone with sleep apnea?
    I have sleep apnea and am scheduled to pick up a cpap machine this week. I found them to be uncomfortable when I spent the night at the sleep clinic but I'm going to give it a try. My sleep apnea is moderate to severe so I've got to try something to improve my condition. I've heard several people say they hadn't slept so well in years after going on the cpap. Can anyone out there give me a review? If they are bothersome at first can you eventually get used to them?

    • ANSWER:
      It takes about 2 weeks to get use to the machine. They are wonderful once you get use to them, I promise you! I hated mine at first! But my wife wanted me to live! I swear that it made me feel 20 years younger ( i am 61). I fought against it at first! But it is the best thing that has ever happened to me, I only wish I hadden't been such a hard headed sonofwhaterver in resisting to go to the sleep lab in the first place!

      Give it time you will really feel better! Try different face pieces including the type that just fit in your nose only ... try it out and use a chin strap to keep your mouth closed. It keeps your face free!

      Good luck stay with it!

      APS

  18. QUESTION:
    How would someone correct a sleep disturbance problem?
    If someone was tested for sleep apnea and did not have it, but was told they have sleep disturbance, how would that someone fix it or what can they do to get a more restful night of sleep?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm curious what type of sleep disturbance they said that you have. Do you stop breathing in sleep? Do you toss and turn? Do you snore? I'm asking you this because I don't know exactly what type of treatment should I recommend for you. I think positional therapy can be helpful for you. Click the link to learn more about this type of treatment.

  19. QUESTION:
    What surgeries could I possibly have received for snoring?
    When I was young (11 years old), I received a surgery for snoring. I don't know the details of what type of surgery I could have received. What are some possible surgeries I could have ve received for snoring?

    I don't this surgery was effective because I still snore, I have sleep apnea. I don't know if I had sleep apnea when I was 11 or if it was just snoring. For certain, I have sleep apnea now.

    • ANSWER:
      I thought the surgery was when someone has their adenoids taken out.I'm not really sure of the medical term for this specific surgery,but I'm pretty sure that the person has his/her adenoids removed to help reduce/prevent snoring.And,other health related problems associated with adenoid problems.
      Sorry I couldn't offer much more information to your question.
      Take care.
      You can always 'Google' for the information your looking for.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is there a type of blood infection which can cause a baby to stop breathing for 6+ seconds at a time?
    We've had a 3 week old baby in our care for the past week. We noticed that today he started breathing funny, sometimes stopping breathing for up to 7ish seconds per time to the point where he would turn blue. We took him into the hospital and the doctors are running blood tests and the whole 9 yards. They said, from what they know now (which isn't a lot), that it could be either sleep apnea or a blood infection. What kind of blood infection causes you to stop breathing for moments at a time?

    • ANSWER:
      It looks like a Group B streptococcus infection could lead to breathing problems. A blood infection could accompany it, which might be what the doctors are searching for.

  21. QUESTION:
    CPAP machine - are there different types of masks for these machines?
    My husband has sleep apnea and must use a CPAP machine. He struggles with the mask he has, it fits over just the nose and he has natural excess cartilage - it is becoming VERY uncomfortable. Do they make these masks that cover the mouth instead, or maybe cover both mouth and nose?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes they make different styles of masks. Check out respironics.com or resmed.com they are manufactors of masks and can give ya some ideas. Also contact your home care company who supplied the mask and machine. Insurance should cover 2 masks per year.

  22. QUESTION:
    What doctors do I take my father to for these symptoms?
    type one diabetes
    high blood pressure
    sleep apnea
    irregular heart beat
    stroke
    stage 4 kidney failure

    please answer as in depth as possible... do NOT answer if you are not sure.
    i understand the family physician can answer this but want to make sure he isn't missing anything or not giving us all information needed.

    • ANSWER:
      Best thing you can do is take him to a family doctor, they'll make appointments for you and send you to the exact specialists you need.

  23. QUESTION:
    My husband is having problems with his new breathing machine?
    My husband was diagnosed with severe sleep apnea. He just got his breathing machine last week. It is a pretty big device that wraps around his entire head. It covers his nose and mouth.

    He is waking in the middle of the night and taking it off. He says this is because it makes his throat hurt. Anyone have experience with these machines? Does this take getting used to? Could it be because of the type of mask they gave him? It seems he said something about the mask having been picked because of his level of sleep apnea, and the amount of oxygen that needs to be forced. Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Melanie,
      CPAP - continuous positive airway pressure - treatment may cause side effects in some people. These side effects include a dry or stuffy nose or throat, irritated skin on the face, dry mouth, and headaches. If the CPAP isn't adjusted properly, stomach bloating and discomfort may occur while wearing the mask. As your husband is having trouble with CPAP side effects, he would be advised to work with his sleep specialist, or his nursing staff, and the CPAP technician. Together, he can take steps to reduce these side effects. These steps include adjusting the CPAP settings or the size/fit of the mask, or adding moisture to the air as it flows through the mask. A nasal spray may relieve a dry, stuffy, or runny nose.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  24. QUESTION:
    What do you do if you have allergies and are using a cipap machine?
    I have a cipap machine for my sleep apnea and I also had a nasal mask for it. When I got it I forgot to mention that I had allergies and its causing me to breathe out of my mouth. What should I do about this? There a cheaper way of fixing this, because a full face mask would cost me 300 dollers.
    I tried using it the other day and I couldn't because it was hard to breathe and was losing lot of the pressure, because I couldn't breathe out from my nose.
    The other thing I noticed was my cipap machine has a humidifier and when its activiated its even harder to breathe cause it does trigger my allergies and makes my nose very congested. What do I do about that?

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same porblem, here's what I do: take a benedryl-D every night, and I have an Ionic Breeze in my bedroom--they aren't cheap but other HEPA type air filters require filter replacement & they get pricey after awhile, also, you can try an electrostatic air filter that you put in the air intake of your central heat/ac--if you have that.

  25. QUESTION:
    how to tell the difference between withdraw pain and the real pain?
    This is all cause by 2 MVA 4 months apart 6 yrs ago. I just had my 2nd surgery. My meniscus was trimmed again and the back of my knee caps were shaved. Both knees, 2nd time since 8/08. After my first surgery I was fine about 6 weeks after the surgery. I started an exercise program, ate right and was feeling great. Six months later my problems/symptoms started coming back (pain & limping). By my second surgery I was in bad shape. I had been using a cane for the last year and a half. I was taking 2 30mg oxy and 4 5mg oxy along with 2400mg of neurontin daily. I have pretty much quit taking all (narcotic) pain meds. I was given 10mg oxycodone to help ween me off the big stuff and because the pain should be getting less. I know longer walk with a limp (not caused by pain, but it just wouldn't work correct), but the Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I was told I have is still [I think] causing this constant non stop burning aching tooth ache type feeling in both my legs from hip to ankle. I would think that if this pain is withdraw pain I would be feeling bad head to toe. Yes? No? I was told I also have moderate arthritis in my right (anterior?) knee, but really do not feel any additional pain there. Which is great of coarse! During the time around my first surgery I was prescribed 3 10mg oxycodone per day and had ZERO problems stopping that medication, but was only taking narcotic pain meds 6 months not 2 yrs. If I were to take 3 10mg oxycodone per day I think I would have enough decrease in pain to function w/o looking depressed. When I take some narcotic pain med (today for example) the pain goes away. It goes away A LOT more than before the surgery. I say, duh, I had some stuff repaired, but I was told CRPS can not be reversed. Am I screwed? If I go back on the pain meds I'll have to take drug tests. If I take drug tests that means no marijuana. No pot means awful awful sleep, nightmares! I ended up taking a sleep study test about 4 months before my 2nd surgery and was found to have sleep apnea maybe 4/10 so not too bad, but enough to cause me to awake enough to "restart" my dreams, my nightmares. It's been like this most all my life. I again (just like before I started pain management) now have to decide if I want better days or better sleep. How long do I have to not take ANY narcotic pain meds before I know if this burning sensation in my legs is caused by CRPS or withdraw. Again my upper body feels pretty good. Sometimes I have a runny nose and I was told that that is a withdraw symptom, so I exclude those days. Any help is appreciated. thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Your medical situation should be addressed by a doctor only after a complete examination and tests.

      That said, some suggestions:

      The sleep apnea is easiest. For a mils case, a dental device to keep your jaw in place may solve the problem. If that doesn't work, try a CPAP machine. I would not consider surgery because it is only about 30% successful and even that success could be temporary.

      In terms of your burning pain in the legs, it may be because of pinching of nerves in your back. Have you had an MRI to assess disc damage? Try changing your sleeping position (e.g., fetal position) -- or even in a lay-z-boy type chair that follows the contours of the body (though sleeping on your back is worst for apnea).

      You don't mention physical therapy. It can be of great utility in MVA recovery -- and post-surgery recovery as well. Strengthening your core should help.

      You should find a doctor that specializes in pain management and who will titrate your meds.

      Good luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    How will the bipap machine help me?
    Im overweight and i have sleep apnea ive been breathing through my mouth my whole life and when i talk it sounds like my nose is permmanently clogged i really want to breathe through my nose eventually? Does any one have any help?

    • ANSWER:
      There are three types of apnea: obstructive, central, and what they call mixed. No matter which type, people with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep. There are different causes but one major one is airway blockage.
      Sleep apnea can cause a myriad of other problems such as high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease, memory problems, weight gain, impotency, and even headaches.

      I was diagnosed a little over a year ago, and started a CPAP machine which has been really helpful. You should check out this site. They have a really helpful resource section, too.

  27. QUESTION:
    How do patients that use cpap machines and how they adjust to felling suffocated?
    my mom is a patients that has sleep apnea and uses a cpap machine and fells like she is scared to use it cause she fells like shes claustrophobic and cant breathe with it on and whats to know about it and others problems and such.
    she isn't able to wear the mask because of it.

    if you have/had the same problem then let me now.

    PLEASE&&THANKS!!
    Hannah
    i have the nose tubes and still fill that way.

    • ANSWER:
      My daughter uses a CPAP also..it takes a while to get used to the uncomfortable feeling of "smothering", but she did eventually adjust to it. Also you might see about just getting the nose line, instead of the whole face mask. Check with your local health care provider about the different types of masks.

  28. QUESTION:
    what type of sleep disorder would stop a person from being woke up?
    I can't be woke up from a sound sleep and was tested for sleep apnea but it came back ok but need to know what I need to be tested for!

    • ANSWER:
      the "lack of having a Snoozester account" disorder!

  29. QUESTION:
    Know anything about sleep apnea in a child?
    My 3 year old has sleep apnea. I just realized this (along with snoring) and have him an appointment for an ear, nose and throat doctor. I'm wondering if there is anything I should know, or anything that will help the situation until our appointment. I didn't realize that children get this...any suggestions are welcome! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes children have sleep apnea. There are two types. The first is the most common. It is obstructive. Generally removing the tonsils and or adenoids solves the problem. I have seen obese children with OSA that use cpap but this is rare. The second type is central sleep apnea. It is when the brain does not tell the body to breathe. This is treated with bipap.

      google sleep apnea in children and look at www.sleepnet.com

      Best wishes

  30. QUESTION:
    What tests determine chronic fatigue syndrome?
    I noticed that I have been feeling really weak and really tired. I was diagnosed with Sleep Apnea and Narcolepsy, but it seems like that isn't the cause, because the doctor gave me a sleep apnea machine and prescribe me with Provigil and Ive been using it everyday. It's been like a year now and I still feel weak and my sleep was never refreshing. Could this be chronic fatigue syndrome or barrs empsom virus? Where do I go to get tested for CFS? I am sure that is the cause, because even with increase dosage of provigil I still feel really low energy...Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Diagnosing CFS is difficult because there's no test for it (no blood test, MRI, CT or any other test), it's symptoms are shared by many other conditions, it doesn't show as a physical symptom, it has remissions and relapses, the symptoms vary from one person to another in the type of symptoms, the number of symptoms and the severity, and no two people have exactly the same symptoms.

      Because CSF can look like many other conditions, it's important not to self-diagnose. Your doctor should consider a diagnosis of CSF is these two criteria are met:

      1. You have an unexplained, persistent fatigue that's not due to exertion, isn't greatly relieved by rest, hasn't been a lifelong problem and results in a significant reduction in your previous level of activity.

      2. 4 or more of these symptoms have been present for at least 6 months:

      Impaired memory/concentration

      Extreme, prolonged exhaustion and sickness following physical or mental activity

      Unrefreshing sleep

      Muscle pain

      Multijoint pain without swelling or redness

      Headaches of a new type or severity

      Sore throat that's occurs frequently or is recurring

      Tender/sore cervical (neck) or axillary (armpit) lymph nodes

      Your weakness, unrefreshing sleep and lack of energy are not compelling signs of CSF. They are typical of sleep disorder as well as major depression, to name two conditions. Fatigue and weakness are also two of the symptoms of mononucleosis, which is caused by the Epstein-Barr (not barrs empson) virus.

      I suggest you make an appointment with your doctor to sit down and discuss your ongoing sleep problem, weakness and lack of energy.

      Just out of curiosity, did you initially have polysomnography? Are you using a CPAP or BiPAP? What's your Provigil dosage and frequency?

  31. QUESTION:
    How can I get used to a CPAP machine?
    I just started usuing a CPAP machine for sleep apnea and I can't fall asleep. I have a nasal mask but don't like the presure on my face. I just laid awake and laid awake until I gave up and came out to the computer. Would using a sleeping pill help? Any other suggestions? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Wearing a CPAP mask will never be more comfortable than not wearing one. That being said, most folks do get used to it pretty fast if they use the right set up.

      Use the right mask (nasal pillow, full face, etc.). Check for mask types - http://www.cpap.com/
      Use the right fit (small, medium, large)
      Use the right tension (some people compensate for leaks by making them too tight)
      Use the humidifier if it dries your nose too much.
      Use the newer quiet CPAP machines with the right settings (i.e slow pressure ramp up, pressure decrease on exhalation).

      Call your CPAP provider and ask for a new mask fitting if needed. Insurance will typically want compliance data so your provider will want to make sure you're comfortable enough to use them.

      Should CPAP really not work from you, you may also check alternatives ranging from oral appliances (http://www.sleeptest.com/cpap-alternatives), surgical approaches (http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/868770-overview) or even nasal strips (http://www.putanendtosnoring.com/strips.htm) and weight loss. First ask your sleep doctor though because sleep apnea is a serious disease.

  32. QUESTION:
    Acetaminophen has been linked to Respiratory Disease and Lung Function capacity reduction?
    "Oxidative stress may increase the risk of asthma, contribute to asthma progression, and decrease lung function. Previous research suggests that use of acetaminophen, which is hypothesized to reduce antioxidant capacity in the lung, is associated with an increased risk of asthma. We hypothesized that acetaminophen use may also be associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and decreased lung function".

    Could High Acetaminophen use be linked to Sleep Apnea as well?

    • ANSWER:
      The study you cited (McKeever, Am. J Resp Crit Care, 2005) is a population-based study examining the effect of chronic, daily use of pain relievers on lung function. Of the 3 types studied (aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen), the rates were 8%, 4%, and 2% respectively among daily users. Most people use pain relievers for temporary relief. If they suffer from chronic pain, they should seek medical attention.

      Sleep apnea is a disorder where patients breath inadequately or stop breathing during sleep. The most common cause is obstructive sleep apnea, where the soft tissue in the mouth/neck collapse and impair airflow. The most common cause is due to obesity, though there are non-obese patients with this disorder.

      Presently, there are no studies that definitely link acetaminophen use with obstructive sleep apnea.

  33. QUESTION:
    How can I get use to my CPAP?
    I have sleep apnea and I have the full face mask. I am having a hard time getting use to it. I am also claustrophobic. Anyone have any suggestions that might help?

    • ANSWER:
      there are different types of masks if one is not comfortable then you can call the company you got it from and ask for a different brand. if you really cant stand the full face mask talk to Your doctor. he may be able to switch you to a nasal mask that has a chin strap to help keep your mouth shut but it doesn't actually cover the mouth so you may not be as claustrophobic on it. also ask the company if they put a ramp on your machine. this means that the pressure starts low and slowly rises over up to 30 minutes to reach your prescribed pressure. so it is not so strong when you are WIDE wake and is easier to deal with. Another thing the doctor might try ids whats called BIPAP , this has 2 levels of pressure for every breath. a high level for breathing in and a lower lever so it is easier to exhale. your CPAP only has the high level and this can be hard to blow out against.

  34. QUESTION:
    What are the affects of sleep apnea?
    Sometimes during the day, I suddenly feel disoriented, and a bit dizzy.
    A neighbor said it might be caused by sleep apnea, I'm not sure and before I go see the doctor, I want to find out a bit more about what sleep apnea actually is.

    • ANSWER:
      I would check with a doctor. You could be having rhythm problems with your heart.

      One of the main symptoms one with apnea will notice is that they are always too tired to do anything. They will have no energy, and will often drop off in a nap if they get still long enough.

      There are 2 types of sleep apnea-the most common (90%+)is called "obstructive apnea" and involves air passages becoming restricted during sleep. There is a lot of snoring. Usually the spouse of a person with obstructive apnea will know it. It is generally well treated with a "c-pap" machine. Positive air pressure is kept on the breathing passages to help keep them open. The success rate of treatment is generally very high.

      Then there is "central apnea" where the brain forgets to send out the signal to breathe. This is not common. Treatment usually is done with a "v-pap" machine (there are other types), and often medication (sleeping pill) is required. The "v-pap" varies in pressure from intake to outgo, and can even ventilate the patient when they stop breathing. Success is not nearly as good as with Obstructive apnea.
      Some people have varying degrees of both apneas called "complex apnea".

      Sleep studies are expensive, about grand. Some c-paps are just a few hundred dollars. But variable pressure auto ventilators costs about grand. If you have a decent insurance, then you may only spent a few hundred out of pocket.

      Sleep apnea is dangerous.

  35. QUESTION:
    What kind of costs are associated with CPAP machines?
    My doctor has ordered a CPAP machine to treat my moderate sleep apnea. Does anyone know the costs associated with the machines? I know the price varies depending on type of machine, etc. I was wondering if I am actually purchasing the machine or just renting it. I am checking with my insurance to get more information, however in the meantime I was wondering what other people's experiences were when they got the machines? There is a lady coming to my home tomorrow to get me hooked up with one, but i'm not sure that she will know anything regading the cost, renting vs. buying, etc. Any info would be appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      usually your insurance company has a deal with the home care company. The person that brings you the machine should be able to tell you what you are to pay = if they dont make sure you dont sign for it unless you get it in writing - they can call the home office and the set up person can write and sign what ever they quoted. some companies you will rent some you will buy. some make you keep track of the amount yu use the machine with built in chip and if they are renting and you are not using enough they will take it away. every 6 months you can call for supplies as long as you are using the machine. Here is a little known fact - there are different types and brands of masks. they will usually bring you one of the cheaper ones. this is fine for most people but you need to ask them that if you cant wear this mask can you trial another and how long can you try wearing it before youa re stuck with it. my son had a really great mask during the sleep test but they brought a cheap one that was not as comfortable. i had 1 week to let him try it before they would bring the other.

  36. QUESTION:
    Is there any treatment for the esophageal varices?
    I am 460 lbs. I have Type II non-insulin dependant Diabetes, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, and hypersplenia.

    I was scheduled for Gastric Bypass surgery on April 5th, 2007 but they aborted the operation due to the esophageal varices. The GI specialist that my bariatric surgeon sent me to says there in NO TREATMENT. Yet my surgeon will not allow a second opinion. Please leave any advice you have.

    • ANSWER:
      The treatment for esophageal varices is directed immediately to control the bleeding, and then long-term medical therapy. Immediate control of bleeding is usually performed by endoscopic means. In fact, bleeding can be initially controlled in approximately 90 percent of cases. However, the failure rate for endoscopic therapy is between 10 and 30 percent. Thus, longer term therapy is required in order to prevent a patient from bleeding.

      Variceal hemorrhage stops spontaneously in approximately 62 to 70 percent cases. However, recurrent bleeding occurs in 40 percent of patients within the next 72 hours. In fact, 60 percent of patients will rebleed within seven days of their initial bleeding. Although this type of bleeding will stop, it is the high rebleeding rate and the complications from acute hemorrhage which make control of bleeding mandatory in both the initial period of the variceal bleed and the chronic state after the patient has been stabilized.

      Variants of esophageal varices are gastric varices. Gastric varices are dilated blood vessels that are found predominantly in the stomach. The true incidence of gastric varices is unknown. However, investigators have reported a wide incidence ranging between 20 and 70 percent in patients with esophageal varices. When gastric varices are identified without coexisting esophageal varices, a splenic vein thrombosis may be present.

      Another variant of portal hypertension is portal hypertensive gastropathy. It is present in 50 percent of patients with portal hypertension. These patients have dilated arterioles and venules (small veins). This abnormality is seen usually in the fundus and cardia of the stomach (approximately 2/3 of the stomach). It is rarely seen in the antrum (last 1/3) of the stomach. It appears to have a "snake skin " or "reticulated" appearance.

      Long-term treatment of portal gastropathy and gastric varices is with beta-blockers. They usually take the form of propranolol, a nonselective beta-blocker. These medications allow the pressure within the veins to be decreased, thus reducing the chance that bleeding will occur. Increased incidence of portal hypertensive gastropathy is noted in patients who undergo sclerotherapy for esophageal varices in the past.

      Other treatments for upper GI bleeding associated with esophageal varices include vasopressin, vasopressin with nitroglycerin, somatostatin, balloon tamponade, TPSS (transhepatic portosystemic shunt), transhepatic catheter embolization, shunt surgery, gastric stapling and sclerotherapy with or without any.

      =]

  37. QUESTION:
    Is sleeping 5-6 hours per night normal with cpap therapy?
    I have been diagnosed with sleep apnea and have been using a cpap machine for about a year and a half. Since that time I have not slept longer than 7 hours a night and most nights I only sleep 5 or 6 hours. Is this normal for people most people using this type of therapy?

    • ANSWER:
      It depends a lot on your age and weight, as well as your fitness.
      If you are Joe average, and about 30 years old, I do believe 6 hours sleep is adequate, if you are really active, maybe not enough, if your weight is over nominal guidelines, it should be ok.
      The important thing to consider is how much REAL sleep did you get prior to using the cpap, and how much are you getting now.

  38. QUESTION:
    Is it possible that I might have inherited sleep apnea from my father?
    He was a smoker for a very very long time before I was born, and he had a terrible snoring problem. soo could it be inherited. I've only had sleep apnea twice my whole life and it started this year, I'm not overweight. And I'm 16

    • ANSWER:
      Possible. Only a sleep study can truly tell if you have sleep apnea. There are two types; Obstructive and central. Obstructive Sleep Apnea affects over weight patients but other things can still cause it. Central Sleep Apnea is caused when the body does not get the breath command from the brain (sleeping on your stomach won't help this type). You should talk to your family doctor about this problem, because he or she can explain more about this. Other than that you shouldn't worry.

  39. QUESTION:
    I need help for psychology midterm please answear as much as possible?
    6. What are the three main limitations to problem solving? Describe them in detail --
    7. What are the two main strategies for solving problems?
    8.what is a problem?
    9. Natural vs artificial concepts
    10. Describe the steps of problem solving?
    11. How do you calculate the I.Q?
    12. How long does it make to become an expert? 10.000 hours
    13. Define " brainstorming".
    14. Compare and contrast wisdom and intelligence.
    15. Define Cognitive map.
    16. Draw a hierarchy of concepts.
    17. Define psychology.
    18. What are the uses of psychology?
    19. Compare and contrast description and explanation.
    20. Define hypothesis
    21. Describe the scientific method.
    22. Stimulus vs response.
    23. Who was the founder of psychology ?
    24. Define structuralism
    25. Define functionalism
    26. What are the major approaches in psychology today ?
    27. Describe structure of personality according to Freud .
    28. Independent vs dependent variable.
    29. Define placebo
    30. What are the four goals of psychology?
    31. What is psychoanalysis ?
    32. What are the levels of consciousness ?
    33. Define consciousness
    34. What is daydreaming ?
    35. Define sleep.
    36. What are the stages of sleep?
    37. Define the REM sleep pattern
    38. What triggers daydreaming?
    39. What are the functions of sleep ?
    40. What does consciousness do for us?
    41. What is a dream?
    42. Freud's theory of daydreaming vs activation synthesis.
    43. What is a synapses
    44. Define circadian rhythms .
    45. List and discuss the major sleep disorders .
    46. Define cognitive learning .
    47. How much time do you have to recuperate sleep debt?
    48. Define meditation.
    49. Define hypnosis .
    50. Delusion vs illusions
    51. What is a psychoactive substance?
    52. Draw a chart of the different categories of psychoactive substances .
    53. Define tolerance , addiction dependence and withdrawal .
    54. What are the most addictive psychoactive substances?
    55. Define insomnia, sleep apnea
    Narcolepsy, night terrors and cataplexy
    56. Latent content vs manifest content
    57. Dreaming vs daydreaming
    58. Nature vs nurture
    59. Fraternal twins vs identical twins
    60. Define adoption
    61. Continuity vs discontinuity
    62.Define critical period and imprinting
    63. Define prenatal,zygote, embryo, and fetus
    64. What are teratogens
    65.defone childhood
    66. Define puberty, adolescence and adulthood
    67. Describe the attachment theory
    68. What are the different types of attachment? 12 pts
    69. What are the four types of parenting
    70. What is LAD
    71. Vocabulary vs grammar
    72. What are the nine passages of the strange situation
    73. Schemes vs scripts
    74. Assimilation vs accommodation
    75. Describe the four stages of piaget's cognitive development
    76. Define object permanence
    77. Define egocentrism, animism contraption and reversibility
    78. What is a right of passage?
    79. Describe the stages of psychosexual development according to erikson
    80. Compare and contrast classical and operant conditioning
    81. Define USC,Ucr , cs and cr
    82. Define extinction, spontaneous recovery discrimination and generalization.
    83. Define reinforcement and punishment?
    84. What are the problems for punishment?
    85. What is insight learning?
    86. How do people generally think?
    87. Define learning memory
    88. What does memory do?
    89. When is memory more effective?
    90. Describe sensory memory in detail?
    91. Describe then structure of working memory?
    92. What is a Freudian slip ?
    93. Describe long term memory?
    94. Procedural vs declarative memory
    95. Episodic vs semantic memory
    96. Implicit vs explicit memory
    97. Recall vs recognitition
    98. What is mood congruent memory .
    99. What are the seven Sins of memory
    100. Give examples of mnemonics
    101. Write a dream of yours and interpret it

    • ANSWER:
      Hey dude ..Is there something wrong with YOU doing some work??...I

  40. QUESTION:
    Can you join the peace corps while on medication?
    Their website says that you may not be qualified if you have a medical disability that may interfere with your job. Does this include people that are dependent on medication and can perform their job correctly as long as they are able to be regularly supplied with the meds they need? Does the Peace Corps accommodate handicaps? Example: Placing someone who has a CPAP(nightly breathing machine for sleep apnea) in a location with electricity? ..Or would this be grounds for rejection?

    • ANSWER:
      The answer is it totally depends. They can accomodate some similar type requirements such as allowing a diabetic who needs insulin (and electricity for power) to serve if they are in control. However, this greatly limits the areas you will qualify to serve in and means that you are going to have to show some special skill or experience that is lacking overall in the program. It also means that your overall time to qualify through medical clearance will most likely be longer, and that you might be in limbo a little longer than others. In my group, we have a diabetic, people on different medications for cholesterol or other maintenance conditions, and we pretty much have electricity most of the time. So--apply and start the medical process. On the Peace Corps website, they have a list of automatic disqualifications and they have a list of conditions that can be accomodated. Check it out, start the process, and see what happens. Good luck!

  41. QUESTION:
    What is the cause of this strange sensation?
    Hi, I have just been diagnosed with diabetes (New Years Eve) and I have spent my month taking care of my sugars and normalising them. The problem is, is that when I go to sleep at night, I have started waking up just before I fall asleep. This only happens ONCE and the feeling cant really be described. It feels like I've just inhaled a drop of water and I feel like I have just choked for like a millisecond. I searched up sleep apnea and I don't think it's that because I don't wake up gasping for air and I don't wake up needing a drink or anything THAT serious. It happened just now. Didn't happen yesterday. In fact, it began happening on Saturday. I have started eating nuts before bed as a snack since I'm a type 1 diabetic (17 years old). The thing is, I have asthma and I hear that too many nuts are not very good for someone with asthma. I have noticed slight wheeziness before bed which makes me take my rescue inhaler. I also tend to get stressed without knowing and strange things start happening to my body. This usually happens during my college assignments if I'm finding it hard to stay on top of the work. So I'm thinking its either stress, asthma, sleeping on my back? Or acid reflux. Oh yes, usually after I've experienced this weird feeling in my throat, I need to go to the toilet like straight after! For a Number 2! Isn't that related to Acid Reflux? omg someone please help me :S

    • ANSWER:
      I wish I could help with it all. I wonder if you should avoid nuts before bed. Maybe you should eat them earlier and eat something else before bed.

  42. QUESTION:
    Which is the worst of all my husband's health problems?
    My husband has been diagnosed with type II diabetes brought on by being overweight and not exercising. He has high cholesteral, high blood pressure, irritable bowl syndrome and depression and he smokes. It has recently been discovered (after several years of frustration and questions) that he suffers from sleep apnea, sexsomnia, and narcolepsy - all linked of course. All of this has greatly affected our lives, but he doesn't seem to want to take the steps required in order to get his life together. I think he has been completely overwhelmed with all of these issues and doesn't know where to start. He only takes medication for his depression, blood pressure and cholesteral. He won't take his insulin because it enables him to put weight on.
    I really feel if he did everything in his power to correct his sleep disorders it would change everything. Does anyone know a good sleep disorder centre in the midlands for a start? How do we get NHS to cover this cost?
    Jeff H's answer is absolutely brilliant! Pretty much sums it all up. My husband is self-destructive and doesn't want to take responsibility for his actions. Even when I've tried my hardest to be sympathetic and understanding, his irresponsibility keeps entering my mind and makes me angry and upset with him. If I address this to him directly he says I'm a control freak and just don't understand him. Shame he tries so hard to change my thinking when all I want to do is get home safely when he is falling asleep behind the wheel or I worry when we've ended up in A&E again because he isn't taking his insulin. But no, he says I should stop nagging him and just let him drive and shut up when he won't take his meds. That's it, I'm control freak - go figure...

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry, all I got was "my husband has wrecked his health, how do I get you to pay for it?"

      Tell him to get his [donkey] off the couch and walk around the block.

  43. QUESTION:
    How do I talk to my Mom about haveing PCOS?
    I am 14 years old and I've found out from the comics from Humon what PCOS is, and it can start afecting you in your teens, It looks like that some people have it but only have 4 of the symptoms. I looked at the list and saw that I have 5 of them, I have no idea on how to talk to my Mom about this, but if its put off it could lead to other medical problems in the future, these are the symptons theres an X by the ones I found I have, I know some of them are maybe nothing but it never hurts to check, and the pain part could be from a small eating problem I'm getting over,

    ~cysts on your ovaries
    ~low insulin levels
    X~infrequent menstrual periods, no menstrual periods, and/or irregular bleeding
    ~infertility or inability to get pregnant because of not ovulating
    X~increased growth of hair on the face, chest, stomach, back, thumbs, or toes
    X~acne, oily skin, or dandruff
    X~pelvic pain
    X~weight gain or obesity, usually carrying extra weight around the waist
    ~type 2 diabetes
    ~high cholesterol
    ~high blood pressure
    ~male-pattern baldness or thinning hair
    ~patches of thickened and dark brown or black skin on the neck, arms, breasts, or thighs
    ~skin tags, or tiny excess flaps of skin in the armpits or neck area
    ~sleep apnea and excessive snoring as breathing stops at times while asleep
    ~depression
    ~gender confusion

    • ANSWER:
      Never self-diagnose yourself with something, especially PCOS.

      Go to your doctor and have a proper diagnosis. You can tell your mum you have read up on PCOS and would like a few blood tests to check the hormone levels and see where to go from there.

      All the symptoms you have are normal when going through puberty though, not many people are diagnosed in their teens as the symptoms of PCOS are so similar to those found when going through puberty.

      Most women are diagnosed when trying to start a family.

  44. QUESTION:
    Do sleep apnea treatments help someone if their sleep apnea is caused by chronic phlegm?
    My husband says I snore sometimes and don't sleep sound. Due to allergies, I have phlegm quite frequently and I think that is my problem. Will the c-pap machine do any good if that is the problem?

    • ANSWER:
      CPAP can help of course. However until you start using this machine you can not imagine how much discomfort it brings to its users. What is more, there may be no need for using it as other more comfortable treatment may well work.

      I'd suggest visiting http://snoringremediescenter.com/ - there you can get a free online questionnaire that can determine what is the type of your snoring and afterwards give suggestions - which of the treatments can work for your particular case best.

      You can also use the free service of online consultation offered by the website.

  45. QUESTION:
    Do they always have to pull out teeth for braces?
    Im 15 so I have all my adult teeth in. My teeth are very crooked, and i really need braces. I have a small jaw which is the main reason my teeth are crowded. I was wondering if they always have to take teeth out or if it depends on the orthodontist. I always hear stories of people getting sleep apnea from getting teeth removed and i was just wondering.

    • ANSWER:
      my ortho uses a special type of braces so you dont have to get any teeth pulled. its called the damon system, i would look into it.

  46. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had these 3 surgeries done at the same time?
    I am getting my soft palate reduction, adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy at the same time.

    I have a couple of questions, i would rather have the general public address than the doctor. Because all the doctor can give me is statistics and 'rare' occassions.

    Is bleeding of the throat prevalent after the surgery?
    I heard i would not get my original voice back after the surgery, how true is this?
    Would i lose weight, after the surgery?
    How long would i have to go without solid food?
    Should spicy food be avoided at all costs, after the surgery?
    Would i be more prone to infections and allergies after the surgery?

    I'm having this surgery because i have OSA - Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    • ANSWER:
      There are three types of apnea: obstructive, central, and mixed; of the
      three, obstructive is the most common. Despite the difference in the
      root cause of each type, in all three, people with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times during the night and often for a minute or longer.

      Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by a blockage of the airway, usually when the soft tissue in the rear of the throat collapses and closes during sleep.

      In central sleep apnea, the airway is not blocked but the brain fails to signal the muscles to breathe.

      Mixed apnea, as the name implies, is a combination of the two. With each
      apnea event, the brain briefly arouses people with sleep apnea in order for them to resume breathing, but consequently sleep is extremely fragmented and of poor quality.

      Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. This is the most common form of breathing-related sleep disorder, marked by episodes of blockage in the upper airway during sleep. It is found primarily in obese people. Patients with this disorder typically alternate between periods of snoring or gasping (when their airway is partly open) and periods of silence (when their airway is blocked). Very loud snoring is a clue to this disorder.

      Guess, the surgeon has decided to do a reduction of your elongated soft palate; which is one of the many causes of OSA.

      Other risk factors or more realistic predisposing factors of OSA:

      1) excessive weight gain or central obesity
      2) Age- loss of muscle mass and thus replaced with fat
      3) gender: male hormones
      4) anatomical abnormalities such as a receding chin
      5) enlarged tonsils and adenoids - common cause among children
      6) family hx
      7) use of alcohol or sedatives
      8) smoking
      9) Diseases/conditions - Hypothyroidism, Obesity, Down's syndrome, vocal cord paralysis; post-polio syndrome, amyloidosis, Marfan's syndrome, neuromuscular disorders

      Someone who has undiagnosed severe
      obstructive sleep apnea is likely to have a heart attack, a stroke, cardiac arrest during sleep, or a harmful accident.

      If you have one or more of the other predisposing factors as mentioned above, esp obesity- having this surgery is not a cure-all guarantee - that your problem will be solved.

      Normally, T&A ( Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy) is done during childhood for chronic tonsillitis. Thruout my childhood, I suffered from frequent upper respiratory infections such as common colds, and the flu; chronic tonsillitis, pharyngitis(sore throat) and laryngitis ( hoarse voice) so much so that I missed a lot of school days. I was constantly placed on antibiotics.

      I didn't have the surgery done until I was 26. Now, my quality of life is so much improved. I'm less prone to upper resp infections; such as tonsillitis with difficulty of swallowing. One of the many benefits of this T&A now is to enjoy drinking ice cold drinks and eating a cone of ice cream; without the side effects. .

      Mind you, because of my age and that being my very first surgery, the recovery phase wasn't a picnic and as pleasant as a child might go thru. I suffered a great deal of pain requiring quite a bit of painkillers. The surgeon stated that my tonsils were so enlarged that I must have suffered quite a bit growing up.

      I had the post-op blues which is one of the side effects of surgery.and anesthesia. However, there was no bleeding, or infection. Nowadays, it's a normal precautionary procedure for surgeons, to give an IV administration of a dose of antibiotic 24-hr pre-operatively.to prevent infection. You don't lose weight as you resume eating normally after a few days. Besides, you don't use this surgery to lose weight.

      Of course, spicy foods are off limits initially; as they are irritating and might induce bleeding. Hot drinks are discouraged as would cause vasodilation and thus bleeding. Ice chips were tolerated and soothing. As a matter-of fact, kids are allowed ice cream 2 hrs post-operatively if there is no vomiting from the anesthesia. After the recovery phase, there is no limit as to any type of foods including spicy foods; which I enjoy.

      There is no effect on your voice as your vocal chords are not involved. Immediately, after surgery, your voice might be a little raspy due to the soreness of your throat and your fear of straining. However, your voice would resume to being normal once the swelling and inflammation is gone. There might be a slight change with the soft palate reduction if any.

      You should not be alarmed. It is a normal and required routine of all pre-op pts to sign this operative consent -. with the stated normal risks of bleeding and infection as with ALL surgeries.

      So, I hope all of the above- answers all your questions adequately.

      Oh, by the way, I still have my allergies and allergic rhinits but not as bad. But I'm not prone to acute tonsillitis anymore and more importantly, when I get a sore throat with the colds, I can swallow without difficulty. And the episodes of upper respiratory infections are less.

  47. QUESTION:
    What are the best sleep apnea machines?
    What should a person diagnosed with sleep apnea use for maximum comfort and breathing improvement?

    • ANSWER:
      The best sleep apnea machines for people with this disorder are dependent on the type of condition they have. You would need to consult a healthcare specialist for that.
      There are two basic types of sleep apnea machines available today. One is the CPAP machine and the other is the BiPAP machine. The CPAP machine produces a continuous flow of air under a certain pressure that allows the muscles on your throat to open up. The BiPAP machine, on the other hand, simply determines whether there is enough air in the lungs and supplies oxygen as needed. The latter is typically prescribed to people who are obese or otherwise have neuro-muscular conditions.

      CPAP machine is the most popular among the two. It is known to help alleviate difficulties in breathing for both central sleep apnea and obstructive sleep apnea.

      To get more information on sleep apnea and possible treatments and machines, you can visit http://getmoresleep.info, this is where I got my own machine and I am very satisfied with it.

  48. QUESTION:
    Are there any over the counter medications I can use for sleep apnea?
    I have severe trouble breathing through my nose at all times of the day. And I feel as thought if there was some type of nasal spray that might help open up my nostrils I would probably do better at night with my breathing. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep apnea medication is an additional option to complete the treatment for your sleep disorder. Unfortunately, most of the medications are not ideal for you and may have undesirable side effects.

      Most of the time, the medications are used to treat central apnea. These drugs stimulate the breathing reflex, but they should be considered temporary measures.

      The most common medications for sleep apnea are: modafinil, acetazolamide, clomipramine, and theophylline. However, if you take these medications without your doctor advice, you can worsen your sleep apnea and your health.

      I think your nose problems is the first thing to fix, before trying to treat sleep apnea. This should be your first priority. Consult your doctor regarding your nose problems.

  49. QUESTION:
    How does sleep deprivation cause a lack of energy?
    In terms of physiology and biochemistry, why does a lack of sleep cause a lack of energy?

    Yes the body and brain need time to rest and recuperate, but how exactly is this related to energy?

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep Apnea - Symptoms And Causes - The Breathing That Stops In The Night Affecting over 18 million American, sleep apnea is a rather serious sleep disorder which causes your breathing to be continuously interrupted throughout the nighttime of sleep.

      Your breathing may be interrupted for as little as 10 seconds and up to a minute or longer. Goodness! With sleep apnea, it is no wonder that you wake up feeling as if you've been beat to within an inch of your life.

      In order to get breathing again after a period of apnea, your brain kicks in to wake you up causing you to start breathing again. This cycle can repeat itself hundreds of time during any given period of sleep.

      Stealing your sleep and your oxygen, when sleep apnea is left untreated it can worsen and can lead to other health conditions such as cardiovascular disease. It can become so severe that it literally threatens your life.

      Now that should make you take of running to visit your healthcare provider!

      Of course, the most clear cut sign of sleep apnea is a constant feeling of grogginess during the daytime. If you suffer with sleep apnea, you may find yourself falling asleep frequently during the daytime hours. It makes perfect sense because if you have sleep apnea you never fall into the deepest and most restorative sleep leaving you feeling exhausted.

      Other symptoms found in sleep apnea include awakening during sleep gasping or choking, profuse sweating, unusually loud snoring and even startling yourself awake frequently as you try to catch your breath.

      You may also find that you have a tough time concentrating or focusing on the day's activities. Sleep apnea can cause you to wake in the morning with a dry mouth, a sore throat, and even a pounding headache. Sleep apnea can also lead you to wild mood swings, depression and even weight gain.

      With sleep apnea the muscles located in the back of the throat relax and obstruct the airway cutting off your breath. Because the muscles in the back of the throat also support the uvula, the tonsils and the tongue itself any of these can also become an obstructive source. This is the most common type of apnea and is called obstructed sleep apnea.

      Less common, is central sleep apnea in which there is no actual mechanical obstruction but rather the brain is incapable of sending the necessary instructions to the appropriate muscles to work to breath.

      A combination of these two types of apnea is known as Mixed Apnea.

      There are many factors that are thought to cause your sleep apnea. Let's face it men, if you are male and over the age of 40, then you are at the highest risk. Sorry! Ladies, at least you get a little break on this high risk. Obesity, smoking, sedative use, alcohol use, enlarged tonsils, adenoids or even mechanical problems with the tongue, nasal septum, or vocal cords can all cause you to develop sleep apnea.

      The causes of sleep apnea and the symptoms that you develop are varied and life-style altering. Deep depression and isolation can result. But you can make a decision to do something differently and you can learn to actively live with your diagnosis of narcolepsy.
      By: Tammy Foster -
      Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com
      For more important information on getting a good night's sleep be sure to visit www.sleep-good.com where you will find advice and tips on sleep habits insomnia, sleep apnea, snoring, and more.

  50. QUESTION:
    I have sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes. Lately im having continuous pins and needles in the little finger?
    of my left hand I s this something to do with the diabetes and what can i do about it?

    • ANSWER:
      Could be just the diabetes, especially if you haven't been able to get your glucose test number down low. It could be from the sleep apnea since that will affect your circulation. It could be that both are contributing their share to your problem. Could be you jarred your little finger. Have the sleep apnea taken care of since it will start damaging your heart and other things and get your diabetes under control. Also see your doctor to make sure you don't have some nerve damage in your finger or whatever.

sleep apnea types

Sleep Apnea Toddler

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body (sequelae). In sleep apnea, your breathing stops or gets very shallow while you are sleeping. Each pause in breathing typically lasts 10 to 20 seconds or more. These pauses can occur 20 to 30 times or more an hour. Symptoms may be present for years, even decades without identification, during which time the sufferer may become conditioned to the daytime sleepiness and fatigue associated with significant levels of sleep disturbance. In adults, the most typical individual with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is obese, with particular heaviness at the face and neck. The hallmark symptom of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in adults is excessive daytime sleepiness. Typically, an adult or adolescent with severe long-standing obstructive sleep apnea will fall asleep for very brief periods in the course of usual daytime activities if given any opportunity to sit or rest. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body.

Sleep apnea is a common disorder that can be very serious. There are two distinct forms of sleep apnea: Central and Obstructive. Sleep apnea can cause high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease, memory problems, weight gain, impotency, and headaches. Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common category of sleep-disordered breathing. The prevalence of OSA among the adult population in western Europe and North America. The hallmark symptom of the disorder is excessive daytime sleepiness. Additional symptoms of sleep apnea include restless sleep, loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps), falling asleep during the day, morning headaches, trouble concentrating, irritability, forgetfulness, mood or behavior changes, anxiety, and depression. Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA). A more invasive surgery usually only tried in difficult cases where other surgeries have not relieved the patient's OSA. Apneas are usually measured during sleep (preferably in all stages of sleep) over a two-hour period.

Weight reduction and avoiding alcohol and sedatives may help some individuals. Surgery to remove excess tissue at the back of the throat , to remove enlarged tonsils or adenoids ,or to create an opening in the trachea to bypass the obstructed airway during sleep. Sleep Apnea in children where removing the tonsils or adenoids does not take care of the problem is usually treated with a C-PAP (continous positive airway pressure) or Bi-Level positive airway pressure. C-PAP is a machine that blows air into your nose via a nose mask, keeping the airway open and unobstructed. Bi-Level has an inspiratory pressure that is higher than the expiratory pressure. Some children have facial deformities that may cause the sleep apnea. Maxillomandibular advancement. In this procedure, the upper and lower part of your jaw is moved forward from the remainder of your face bones. Tracheostomy is used in persons with severe, life- threatening sleep apnea. Laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) is done to eliminate snoring but has not been shown to be effective in treating sleep apnea.

Sleep Apnea Treatment Tips

1. Behavioral Therapy-Is usually all that is needed for a mild case. It changes the person behavior towards the use of alcohol, tobacco which affects the airway.

2. Physical or Mechanical Therapy- The therapy provides air pressure to keep the airway from narrowing.

3. Surgery is considered only when other alternative therapy failed or if the patient volunteered to.

4. Avoid or at least limit alcohol intake.

5. Avoid or limit the use of tranquilizers, sleeping pills.

6. Avoid sleeping on your back.

7. Oxygen and medications may have adjunctive roles in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in some patients.

8. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, which removes excess tissue in the throat to make the airway wider.

9. Tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, which removes the tonsils and/or the adenoids.

10. Tracheostomy, which creates a hole in the windpipe (trachea). A tube is then put in the hole to bring air in.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How are small children tested for sleep apnea?
    I can't see the same testing being used for adults in children....
    I don't know any toddler that would be alright with all that stuff hooked up to them, or them being able to leave it alone.
    Is it the same?
    Also, how is it treated in children?

    I am googling it, although I'm having some trouble finding the information I need for children.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm assuming they'd test a child the same way they test an adult by doing a sleep study test. They hook them up to machines and monitor them while they sleep.

  2. QUESTION:
    My toddler has a strange breathing pattern when she sleeps like she was just crying or something. Any answers?
    She takes short, quick, deep breaths and this continues for a while. It happens even when she hasnt been crying, but it sounds like a toddler that is trying to catch their breath after crying. Sometimes it lasts for a few minutes and sometimes for hours. She does not stop breathing like sleep apnea, but just has trouble breathing and has odd breathing patterns.

    • ANSWER:
      How strange, my 2 year old daughter does the same thing. I took her to the doctor and they said that I should just watch her for a few more days and if she is still doing it when we go back next week then they are going to put her on this machine to monitor her for sleeping disorders. So just talk to your pediatician and see what they say. Just keep your chin up and we will keep you in our thoughts. I hope that things get better for you all.

  3. QUESTION:
    How long should an infant sleep in your room?
    He is three months and daddy will not let him sleep outside of the room. I just don't want him to get used to sleeping in the same room and have to break him of it when he older.

    • ANSWER:
      My toddler is still sleeping in my room. Most of the children in my family cosleep and go into their own beds when they want-from 2 to 3. For infants, it prevents SIDS
      Since research suggests that infants at risk of SIDS have a diminished arousal response during sleep, it seems logical that anything that increases the infant's arousability from sleep or the mother's awareness of her infant during sleep may decrease the risk of SIDS. That's exactly what sleeping with your baby can do. Here are the vital roles a sleep-sharing mother plays:

      DR. SEARS SIDS HYPOTHESIS:

      I believe that in most cases SIDS is a sleep disorder, primarily a disorder of arousal and breathing control during sleep. All the elements of natural mothering, especially breastfeeding and sharing sleep, benefit the infant's breathing control and increase the mutual awareness between mother and infant so that their arousability is increased and the risk of SIDS decreased.

      Mother acts as pacemaker. A major part of my sleep-sharing hypothesis is that mother can act as a breathing pacemaker for her baby. Picture what happens when mother and baby sleep side by side. Mother acts like a breathing pacemaker for her baby during sleep. Together they develop what we call "sleep harmony." Both members of the sleeping pair have simultaneous sleep stages, perhaps not perfectly attuned and not all night long, but close enough that they are mutually aware of each other's presence without disturbing each other's sleep. Because of this mutual sensitivity, as baby normally cycles from deep sleep into light sleep, the presence of the mother raises baby's arousability and awareness. As previously discussed the lack of arousability or ascending out of deep sleep may characterize infants at risk for SIDS. Countless times a mother has said to me, "I automatically awaken just before my baby starts to stir and I nurse her back to sleep. Usually neither of us fully awakens, and we both quickly drift back to sleep."

      While watching Martha sleep next to our babies, I noticed how frequently she would attend to our infant's nighttime needs, often without even waking up. Several times throughout the night she would adjust baby's covers, nurse, or do whatever seemed right for baby's well-being.

      This sleeping arrangement does not imply that a mother should think of herself as a lifeguard, keeping watch every sleeping hour, day and night, for six months or feel that she is an inadequate parent if she chooses not to do so. This attitude puts fear into and takes the joy out of nighttime parenting. I'm simply talking about forgetting cultural norms and doing what comes naturally. Don't feel that you must never let your baby sleep alone or that you must go to bed early with baby every night. Remember that SIDS is a relatively uncommon occurrence, not a nightly threat to your baby's life.

      Mother fills in a missing ingredient. In the early months, much of a baby's night is spent in active sleep the state in which babies are most easily aroused. As we discussed previously, this state may "protect" the infant against stop-breathing episodes. From one to six months, the time of primary concern about SIDS, the percentage of active sleep decreases, and quiet, or deeper, sleep increases. More deep sleep means that babies start to sleep through the night. That's the good news. The concern, however, is that as baby learns to sleep deeper, it is more difficult for him to arouse when there is an apnea episode, and the risk of SIDS increases. By six months, the baby's cardiopulmonary regulating system has matured enough that the breathing centers in the brain are better able to restart breathing, even in deep sleep. But there is a vulnerable period between one and six months when the sleep is deepening, yet the compensatory mechanisms are not yet mature. During the time baby is at risk, mother fills in. In fact, mother sleeps like a baby until the baby is mature enough to sleep like an adult. That warm body next to baby acts as a breathing pacemaker, sort of reminding baby to breathe, until the baby's self-start mechanisms can handle the job on their own. (See Sleep Safety)

  4. QUESTION:
    Why does my son sweat when he sleeps?
    He's 2. House temp is about 70, he doesn't like blankets. Sleeps in a t-shirt or in middle of the night he will pull that off and sleep in nothing but his diaper. Wakes up and his hair and back are soaked and I have to change and wash his sheets each time. he has several changes of sheets because of this. I turn his ceiling fan on. He sometimes wakes in the middle of the night because he gets too hot. Is there a way to make him more comfortable?
    Neither I nor his dad does.
    "Is there a way to make him more comfortable?"

    • ANSWER:
      Some toddlers sweat buckets while they're in the deepest part of their nightly sleep cycle, often ending up soaking wet. While sweating can occasionally be a symptom of sleep apnea a serious sleep disorder in which the upper airway passages are blocked repeatedly during the night, making it difficult for your toddler to breathe usually nighttime perspiration is nothing to worry about.

      What you can do about it
      Deep sleep is when your toddler is getting the best of what sleeping has to offer his body is restoring itself and getting ready for a new day so don't worry too much about his sweating. Do make sure he's comfortable, though. Put him down to sleep in light, cotton clothes and keep his room a little on the cool side.

      If your toddler's perspiration is accompanied by snoring or extended pauses in his breathing (other possible symptoms of sleep apnea), time the pauses to see how long they last. Up to ten seconds is normal, and longer breaks may be, too. But to definitively rule out sleep apnea, talk to his doctor about it. She can help you decide what step to take next.

  5. QUESTION:
    How long did you co-sleep with your baby?
    Or if you're still co-sleeping, how long do you intend on co-sleeping? Cason is 7 months old and we've been co-sleeping since he was 2 weeks old and I love it! I'm just curious how long other people did it for and why they stopped. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I`ve heard a rumour that most kids night-wean and move outta mom`s bed around 2-4 years. And while it is crazy sleeping with me, hubby, 2.5 year old, and a 9 month old in bed I'm not willing to force my toddler into something he is clearly not ready for. In fact lately he doesn't even want to sleep in his bed to start the night and he used to love it.

      If he's still in my bed at 4 I'll probably bribe him ;-)

      http://www.askdrsears.com/faq/sl15.asp

      This is a common concern, and a common argument against co-sleeping. The answer to your question is: "Yes, he will learn to fall asleep by himself." BUT, it will probably be much later than you are anticipating. Many parents have an unrealistic expectation about when their infants should be able to fall asleep by themselves. I hear people say six months, or one year. In reality, it's usually between 2 and 4 years.

      http://www.kathydettwyler.org/detsleepthrough.html

      The expected pattern is for mother and child to sleep together, and for child to be able to nurse whenever they want during the night. Normal, healthy, breastfed and co-sleeping children do not sleep "through the night" (say 7-9 hours at a stretch) until they are 3-4 years old, and no longer need night nursing. I repeat -- this is NORMAL and HEALTHY. Dr. James McKenna's research on co-sleeping clearly shows the dangers of solitary sleeping in young infants, who slip into abnormal patterns of very deep sleep from which it is very difficult for them to rouse themselves when they experience an episode of apnea (stop breathing).

      http://www.naturalchild.org/tine_thevenin/need_vs_habit.html

      If the body indicates a need for food, treating it like a habit and disregarding it will not make the hunger go away. Ignoring the sensation of wanting to lie down and sleep will not cure one forever from having to sleep eight hours a day.

      But if one is in the habit of putting his keys in his right pocket, there need be only a worn-out pocket to change the habit from putting the keys in right to the left pocket.

      The child who seeks his parents' bed at night is expressing a basic need. And this need must take its own time and pace for satisfaction.

      The child who is thus allowed to be with his parents will gradually mature to being satisfied with sleeping elsewhere, usually seeking the companionship of another member of the family. Should this child choose to sleep alone, it might do well to be aware that he has not transferred his seeking security from his parents or siblings to an inanimate object. If the child wants to sleep with his parents, it means he needs it. If he crawls into his parents' bed but then is content to be taken to a sibling's bed, it may mean that he was in the habit of going to his elders' bed.

      For some strange reason we tend to think that to satisfy a child's need is to make it into an unbreakable habit, where in truth the exact opposite is true.6

      When our children develop a "good" habit, one that suits us, we are afraid it is not going to last. But when our children develop a "bad" habit, one that does not suit us, we are afraid it is going to last forever. So many people are afraid that their children will not grow up. We are told to feed them solids with a spoon at three weeks of age, lest babies will never learn to eat solids, let alone with a spoon. We are told to toilet train them when they are one year old or they will never quit wearing diapers. We are told to begin to discipline them at one month, otherwise they will never listen to us. We are told that children must always sleep in their own bed or they will always want to sleep with us. It is commonly believed that babies need to be weaned by the mother. And yet when weaning is left totally up to the child, it happens in a natural, healthy, and relaxed way. At the time the child no longer needs direct physical contact with his mother, then he weans himself from the breast. Likewise, parents' experiences indicate that the healthy child will wean himself in time from the parental bed.

      Children should be given the credit that, provided the home environment is healthy, they will mature. As each need is fulfilled at each stage, they will move on and become more mature. (We did. Let's hope.)

      It will be found that one phase passes into another, and another, and another. Please trust that in a sound surrounding the child will graduate from each stage of development.

      I remember carrying my first infant throughout the day. Then she began to crawl and I no longer needed to hold her so frequently. I remember nursing her fifteen times a day. Now she is weaned and eats and drinks what we eat and drink. I used to take her with me wherever I went. And if I could not take her I stayed home. (Except if she was asleep.) She was happiest with this arrangement. Then when she was about three years old, she took another step toward independence-, she looked forward to the occasional babysitter to read her a bedtime story

  6. QUESTION:
    I dont think I can handle this anymore?
    My son is only 5 months old..he has been hospitalized twice. He has been diagnosed with sleep apnea, sagittal craniosynosis, tremurs, bronculitis, bonchio spasms and the most recent ringworm. He has had one surgery for his sagittal craniosynosis last month. I keep telling myself that it is fixable but I am afraid that one day something will be wrong with him and it wont be fixable. How can I keep my head up when so many things are always wrong with him? He is on breathing treatments every day until April...it is getting hard to keep happy! Do you have any advice for me?
    He also has ezcema and we are working really hard to try and clear that up

    • ANSWER:
      Don't loose your faith. I was not expected to live long after birth and the doctors insisted I would not make it, but I did. They told my mom that I would not live past five years of age, but here I am. Doctors told me as a teen that I would loose the ability to walk as I got older. That was 15 years ago and my favorite pastime is rollerblading. I am only 28 and have been diagnosed with asthma, Rhumatoid arthritis, Mitrol Valve Prolapse, Degenerative Disk Disease, Carpel tunnel, and Spondylosis. In fact, a couple of the methods they now use to treat respitory problems like Asthma in very young children were developed by my team of doctors when I was but a toddler dealing with my severe breathing problems. It was not always easy for me growing up, I spent a lot of time in the hospital. But you know what? I don't regret any of it, dealing with my illnesses has taught me many lessons...the most important one of them is FAITH. You should trust in the Lord to do what is right and leave it in his hands.
      I know it is so easy to be overwhelmed with what you are going through, and I truly feel for your situation. But please don't give up, keep faith, that sweet baby depends on you. I have dealt with medical problems throughout my youth and I continue to deal with things even today. But I wouln't trade my life for the world. What others may consider as my weaknesses are what made me strong. You can do this. Get through this hurdle and have faith and trust in God. "All things work as good to those that love the Lord" I will pray for you! Good luck!!

  7. QUESTION:
    What is the meaning of dreaming more in a certain place?
    I am staying at my parents house in LA and I ALWAYS dream more when I'm here. They say that they dream every night here and never have anywhere else where they have lived... Some people have suggested the fact that the energy from the nearby road has caused this.. any other suggestions??

    • ANSWER:
      Job 33 (Amplified Bible) 14For God [does reveal His will; He] speaks not only once, but more than once, even though men do not regard it [including you, Job]. 15[One may hear God's voice] in a dream, in a vision of the night, when deep sleep falls on men while slumbering upon the bed, 16Then He opens the ears of men and seals their instruction [terrifying them with warnings], +++"dream facts and tidbits 1. One-third of your lives is spent sleeping.

      2. In an average lifetime, you would have spent a total of about six years of it dreaming. That is more than 2,100 days spent in a different realm!

      3. Dreams have been here as long as mankind. Back in the Roman Era, striking and significant dreams were submitted to the Senate for analysis and interpretation.

      4. Everybody dreams. EVERYBODY! Simply because you do not remember your dream does not mean that you do not dream. In fact, you have several dreams during a normal night of sleep.

      5. Dreams are indispensable. A lack of dream activity can mean protein deficiency or a personality disorder.

      6. On average, you can dream anywhere from one or two hours every night. Moreover, you can have four to seven dreams in one night.

      7. Blind people do dream. Whether visual images appear in their dream depends on whether they were blind at birth or became blind later in life. But vision is not the only sense that constitutes a dream. Sounds, tactility, and smell become hypersensitive for the blind and their dreams are based on these senses.

      8. Five minutes after the end of the dream, half the content is forgotten. After ten minutes, 90% is lost.

      9. The word dream stems from the Middle English word, dreme which means "joy" and "music".

      10. Men tend to dream more about other men, while women dream equally about men and women.

      11. Studies have shown that your brain waves are more active when you are dreaming than when we are awake.

      12. Dreamers who are awakened right after REM sleep, are able to recall their dreams more vividly than those who slept through the night until morning.

      13. Physiologically speaking, researchers found that during dreaming REM sleep, males experience erections and females experience increased vaginal blood flow - no matter what the content of the dream. In fact, "wet dreams" may not necessarily coincide with overtly sexual dream content.

      14. People who are giving up smoking have longer and more intense dreams.

      15. Toddlers do not dream about themselves. They do not appear in their own dreams until the age of 3 or 4.

      16. If you are snoring, then you cannot be dreaming.

      17. Nightmares are common in children, typically beginning at around age 3 and occurring up to age 7-8.

      18. In a poll, 67% of Americans have experienced Deja Vu in their dreams, occurring more often in females than males.

      19. Around 3% of adults suffer from sleep apnea. This treatable condition leads to unexplained tiredness and inefficiency.

      20. Research has shown that the house is the most common setting for dreams.

      21. It is very normal for males to experience an erection during the REM stage of sleep, even when they are not dreaming anything of a sexual nature.

      22. The original meaning of the word "nightmare" was a female spirit who besets people at night while they sleep.

  8. QUESTION:
    Is this surgery safe for my toddler?
    Tonsil removal for a 3 year old boy with sleep apnea? Please any stories or advice are greatly appreciated. I'll give 10 points!

    • ANSWER:
      1.the tonsils will be cut out but they dnt need to cut skin,it can be done from the mouth directly
      2.the child will get anesthasia(s0rry f0r wr0ng spelling)
      3.the child will stay overnight for obrervations

      im not a doctor,but it sounds pretty save to me

  9. QUESTION:
    Anyone have a toddler with sleep apnea?
    I have been told my 3 1/2 year old son has sleep apenea, has anyone had any children diagnosed with this and what was the outcome?

    • ANSWER:
      One of my sons (who is now 4 1/2yrs) used to snore and had sleep apnea. He had is tonsils and adenoids removed when he was 2 1/2 yrs. Instantly, he quit snoring and his sleep apnea was gone.

  10. QUESTION:
    What can cause swollen tonsils w/out sore throat in a toddler?
    My daughter (who just turned 3) has EXTREMELY swollen tonsils. She isn't showing any kind of symptoms. The only reason I even found out that they were swollen is because we were playing w/ the flashlight and I looked inn her mouth. She is eating and drinking fine, no fever, etc. She has been a little more irritable the past few days but I don't know if it has anything to do w/ this because I don't know how long the swelling has been going on. Does anyone know what this could be or know of any good websites that I could check out? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Very swollen tonsils in small children who don't have a fever are usually due to allergies.
      Those tonsils could be causing obstructive sleep apnea, which could explain her irritability; apnea causes frequent, minimal wakings during the night, so the kid doesn't get adequate sleep. She wouldn't be aware of the wakings at all.
      I recommend seeing an ENT; a pediatric one, if possible.

  11. QUESTION:
    How can I STOP A 3 YEAR OLD FROM SNORING?
    I have a 3 year old granddaughter who snores very loud and her stomach is very big. what can I do to help her snoring and get her stomach down?

    • ANSWER:
      I just read an article recently on this in a Parents magazine. It suggested that many children snore due to enlarged adenoids and tonsils which can actually block their airway restricting breathing. If your grandchild is also very tired during the day or doesn't seem to get good quality sleep at night...that can also be from sleep apnea...which can be a caused by enlarged adenoids and tonsils. The snoring could also be from allergy/sinus problems...perhaps a humidifier or some saline nose drops would help open her nasal passages. I would definitely take her to the Dr. and make sure it is nothing serious. As far as the stomach goes, a "pot belly" is a characteristic of most toddlers and doesn't necessarily mean they are fat or overweight. The belly might not be related to the snoring...my 2 year old has a belly too...and he doesn't snore at all.

  12. QUESTION:
    Do dreams reflect on my outlook on life?
    I hardly ever dream, but when I do I'm always upset in them, like someone has done me wrong. And when I wake up I'm really angry for a few minutes, thinking about it. Do these reflect on my life or just thoughts on my day...? Does it mean anything?

    • ANSWER:
      Job 33 (Amplified Bible) 14For God [does reveal His will; He] speaks not only once, but more than once, even though men do not regard it [including you, Job]. 15[One may hear God's voice] in a dream, in a vision of the night, when deep sleep falls on men while slumbering upon the bed,
      16Then He opens the ears of men and seals their instruction [terrifying them with warnings],
      Anger
      To dream that you are holding or expressing anger, symbolizes frustrations and disappointments in your Self. You tend to repress your negative emotions or project your anger onto others. You need to look within yourself.

      Being angry in your dream may have been carried over from your waking life. Dreams can function as a safe outlet where you can express your strong and/or negative emotions. You have some suppressed anger and aggression that you have not consciously acknowledged.
      +++dream facts and tidbits . One-third of your lives is spent sleeping.

      2. In an average lifetime, you would have spent a total of about six years of it dreaming. That is more than 2,100 days spent in a different realm!

      3. Dreams have been here as long as mankind. Back in the Roman Era, striking and significant dreams were submitted to the Senate for analysis and interpretation.

      4. Everybody dreams. EVERYBODY! Simply because you do not remember your dream does not mean that you do not dream. In fact, you have several dreams during a normal night of sleep.

      5. Dreams are indispensable. A lack of dream activity can mean protein deficiency or a personality disorder.

      6. On average, you can dream anywhere from one or two hours every night. Moreover, you can have four to seven dreams in one night.

      7. Blind people do dream. Whether visual images appear in their dream depends on whether they were blind at birth or became blind later in life. But vision is not the only sense that constitutes a dream. Sounds, tactility, and smell become hypersensitive for the blind and their dreams are based on these senses.

      8. Five minutes after the end of the dream, half the content is forgotten. After ten minutes, 90% is lost.

      9. The word dream stems from the Middle English word, dreme which means "joy" and "music".

      10. Men tend to dream more about other men, while women dream equally about men and women.

      11. Studies have shown that your brain waves are more active when you are dreaming than when we are awake.

      12. Dreamers who are awakened right after REM sleep, are able to recall their dreams more vividly than those who slept through the night until morning.

      13. Physiologically speaking, researchers found that during dreaming REM sleep, males experience erections and females experience increased vaginal blood flow - no matter what the content of the dream. In fact, "wet dreams" may not necessarily coincide with overtly sexual dream content.

      14. People who are giving up smoking have longer and more intense dreams.

      15. Toddlers do not dream about themselves. They do not appear in their own dreams until the age of 3 or 4.

      16. If you are snoring, then you cannot be dreaming.

      17. Nightmares are common in children, typically beginning at around age 3 and occurring up to age 7-8.

      18. In a poll, 67% of Americans have experienced Deja Vu in their dreams, occurring more often in females than males.

      19. Around 3% of adults suffer from sleep apnea. This treatable condition leads to unexplained tiredness and inefficiency.

      20. Research has shown that the house is the most common setting for dreams.

      21. It is very normal for males to experience an erection during the REM stage of sleep, even when they are not dreaming anything of a sexual nature.

      22. The original meaning of the word "nightmare" was a female spirit who besets people at night while they sleep.

  13. QUESTION:
    How long do dreams last?
    It seems like my dreams can last for days, weeks and sometimes even months, when im in the dream, but how long are we in the dream mode for? How can it feel like it lasts so long too?

    • ANSWER:
      dream facts and tidbits
      1. One-third of your life is spent sleeping.
      2. In an average lifetime, you would have spent a total of about six years of it dreaming. That is more than 2,100 days spent in a different realm!
      3. Dreams have been here as long as mankind. Back in the Roman Era, profound and significant dreams were submitted to the Senate for analysis and interpretation.
      4. Everybody dreams. EVERYBODY! Simply because you do not remember your dream does not mean that you do not dream. In fact, you have several dreams during a normal night of sleep.
      5. Dreams are indispensable. A lack of dream activity may imply some protein deficiency or a personality disorder.
      6. On average, you can dream anywhere from one to two hours every night. Moreover, you can have four to seven dreams in one night. 7. Blind people do dream. Whether visual images appear in their dreams depend on whether they were blind at birth or became blind later in life. But vision is not the only sense that constitutes a dream. Sound, tactility, and smell become hypersensitive for the blind and their dreams are based on these senses.
      8. Five minutes after the end of the dream, half the content is forgotten. After ten minutes, 90% is lost.
      9. The word dream stems from the Middle English word, dreme which means "joy" and "music".
      10. Men tend to dream more about other men, while women dream equally about men and women.
      11. Studies have shown that your brain waves are more active when you are dreaming than when we are awake.
      12. Dreamers who are awakened right after REM sleep, are able to recall their dreams more vividly than those who slept through the night until morning. 13. Physiologically speaking, researchers found that during dreaming REM sleep, males experience erections and females experience increased vaginal blood flow, regardless the content of the dream. In fact, "wet dreams" may not necessarily coincide with overtly sexual dream content.
      14. People who are in the process of giving up smoking tend to have longer and more intense dreams.
      15. Toddlers do not dream about themselves. They do not appear in their own dreams until the age of 3 or 4.
      16. If you are snoring, then you cannot be dreaming.
      17. Nightmares are common in children, typically beginning at around age 3 and occurring up to age 7-8.
      18. In a poll, 67% of Americans have experienced Deja Vu in their dreams, occurring more often in females than males.
      19. Around 3% of adults suffer from sleep apnea. This treatable condition leads to unexplained tiredness and inefficiency.
      20. According to a research study, the most common setting for dreams is your own house.
      21. It is very normal for males to experience an erection during the REM stage of sleep, even when they are not dreaming anything of a sexual nature.
      22. The original meaning of the word "nightmare" was a female spirit who besets people at night while they sleep. The Mechanics of Dreaming

      While you are dreaming, your body undergoes noticeable changes. Your adrenaline rises, your blood pressure increases, and you heart beats faster. Given this hyperactivity, it should be no surprise how someone with a weak heart can die in their sleep. Their heart may not be able to withstand the strain and the erratic changes that their body is going through.

      Dreaming takes place during REM, which stands for Rapid Eye Movement. It is thus called, because your eyes move rapidly back and forth under the eyelids. REM sleep takes place in the fourth stage of sleep and accounts for 15-20% of your sleep time. From the point you fall asleep, it takes 30 to 90 minutes before you start dreaming. You cycle through the 4 stages of sleep and may enter the REM stage 4 to 7 times in one night. During REM, your blood pressure and heart rate fluctuate and increase. It sounds like your body is going through a lot, but in fact, it is quite the contrary. During REM, your bodies are completely immobile and your muscles remain completely relaxed. You may shift in your bed throughout the night, but when in REM, you are completely still. This is commonly known as "REM Paralysis".

      In REM sleep, the mind is as active as it is during waking. However, chemically it is different. REM is controlled by the excitability level of the cholinergic neruons. Noradrenaline and seratonin are missing in the brain when in the dream state. These chemicals allow the brain to carry out task, solve problems and remember things. This is a reason why you find it so hard to remember your dreams.

  14. QUESTION:
    My father have a breathing problem when sleeping?
    When my father sleep, Sometimes his pharynx or larynx walls sticks with each other and his can't take breath and awoke at once with shouting that his breath is not coming.
    but some after some times he became normal and breathy.
    please some one tell me what is this disease ???
    And what is the cure for it???

    • ANSWER:
      Weight loss, oxygen mask, breaking an resetting his jaw can be done if insurance will cover it, mouth pieces. my brother had his jaw realigned, or something. He had braces and bars in his mouth, his sleep apnea stopped after that. My brother would stop breathing in his sleep even as a toddler. My father is supposed to be on an Oxygen mask because his insurance didn't cover the corrective surgery. And my husband has sleep apnea!! We have used mouth pieces, tried diff sleeping positions, diet changes. Husband is overweight, so weight loss is the most important step. I wake him a lot because he stops berating and sometimes I just hold his jaw out until he starts berating again...but he wakes and bites me sometimes! Ha ha(by accident)

      Sleep apnea is a scary one. Also, drinking less alcohol seems to help.

  15. QUESTION:
    When You Go To Sleep You're Brain Should Be Resting- What About When You're Dreaming?
    Right, my home-ec teatcher and my class were talking about sleep and when you're sleeping you're brain is resting- but what about when you're dreaming??
    When you dream is you're brain STILL resting???

    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      1)When you're dreaming, it means that your brain is resting. Everyday you dream, but sometimes it's not that you didn't dream, it's that you can't remember

      2)Here are some facts about dreams from http://dreammoods.com :

      1. One-third of your lives is spent sleeping.

      2. In an average lifetime, you would have spent a total of about six years of it dreaming. That is more than 2,100 days spent in a different realm!

      3. Dreams have been here as long as mankind. Back in the Roman Era, striking and significant dreams were submitted to the Senate for analysis and interpretation.

      4. Everybody dreams. EVERYBODY! Simply because you do not remember your dream does not mean that you do not dream.

      5. Dreams are indispensable. A lack of dream activity can mean protein deficiency or a personality disorder.

      6. We dream on average of one or two hours every night. And we often even have 4-7 dreams in one night.

      7. Blind people do dream. Whether visual images will appear in their dream depends on whether they where blind at birth or became blind later in life. But vision is not the only sense that constitutes a dream. Sounds, tactility, and smell become hypersensitive for the blind and their dreams are based on these senses.

      8. Five minutes after the end of the dream, half the content is forgotten. After ten minutes, 90% is lost.

      9. The word dream stems from the Middle English word, dreme which means "joy" and "music".

      10. Men tend to dream more about other men, while women dream equally about men and women.

      11. Studies have shown that our brain waves are more active when we are dreaming than when we are awake.

      12. Dreamers who are awakened right after REM sleep, are able to recall their dreams more vividly than those who slept through the night until morning.

      13. Physiologically speaking, researchers found that during dreaming REM sleep, males experience erections and females experience increased vaginal blood flow - no matter what the content of the dream. In fact, "wet dreams" may not necessarily coincide with overtly sexual dream content.

      14. People who are giving up smoking have longer and more intense dreams.

      15. Toddlers do not dream about themselves. They do not appear in their own dreams until the age of 3 or 4.

      16. If you are snoring, then you cannot be dreaming.

      17. Nightmares are common in children, typically beginning at around age 3 and occurring up to age 7-8.

      18. In a poll, 67% of Americans have experienced Deja Vu in their dreams, occurring more often in females than males.

      19. Around 3% of adults suffer from sleep apnea. This treatable condition leads to unexplained tiredness and inefficiency

  16. QUESTION:
    Is this just sleep paralysis or something else?
    When I take naps in the daytime I get stuck in my sleep. I have a hard time breathing which is usually because I'm so scared. I can usually see somewhat. Once I was stuck in my sleep and I thought my brother was making his way over to my bed to wake me up, but then I heard a really deep dark voice, and I couldn't see anything but a black shadow reaching for me, I really started to panic then I woke up. Is this sleep paralysis or something else

    • ANSWER:
      Definitely Sleep Paralysis.

      SP always occurs for not only me but many other people who experience this phenomenon while napping during the daytime, or waking up after around 4:00 a.m. but before 7:00 a.m.. The key is to not be afraid; whatever you see is nothing more than a figment of your imagination and cannot harm you, and another thing to keep in mind is that because your body is still asleep, your breathing is a bit different than normal i.e. heavier. This is also nothing to be afraid of and is completely normal; you won't experience any sort of halt in your breathing unless you have a medical condition called sleep apnea. However this is clearly not the case; keep in mind that although you are conscious, your mind is still projecting images, so you're sort of in a limbo between sleep and awake hence why you saw a dark figure.

      On Sunday during the aftermath of Hurricane Irene, I fell asleep on the couch and had two moments when I feel into sleep paralysis. I saw a butterfly in the living room and the wallpaper was pink with hearts all over them in the first account, and in the second account I saw my husband pacing back and forth complaining about the workers next door causing such a ruckus. When I woke up however; my fiance told me that he was in our bedroom the entire time with our sleeping toddler and didn't move from his spot. It was just my mind projecting images from my imagination.

      Now if this really scares you, all you have to do is try to wiggle your fingertips or toes; this will cause a chain reaction to the signals your body is sending your mind and will automatically halt your experience. You will then wake up.

      It's when you actually have an out of body experience that the real fun begins ;)

      Take care and sweet dreams.

  17. QUESTION:
    I am 12 weeks pregnant, and im soooooooo tired all the time? The only thing that keeps me awake is coffee.?
    I never drink coffee but if i have one cup of coffee a day, im energetic an di can funstion since i have a little 9 month old. Is is bad, i heard coffee is bad, but can i drink it atleast once a day or what other things can get me up and ready or else i get so tired i cant even cook, clean, or get up to do nething.

    • ANSWER:
      The best thing you could do is talk to your doctor about this issue.

      There are many reasons why you could feel malaise or fatigue while pregnant. Proper diet and exercise (as cliche as it sounds) is the best way to stay awake and alert.

      There are also some sleep disorders that could be affecting your alertness. Pregnancy-induced obstructive sleep apnea can happen to you if you have excess tissue collapsing into your airway. Once you have your baby, your body adjusts and you don't have apnea anymore. It depends on how much weight you gain and can be easily treated. Just talk to your doctor.

      How much sleep you get a night can affect your wakefulness too. Are you devoting 7 to 8 hours to sleep? If not, it can cause excessive daytime sleepiness. Do you try to sleep but your toddler wakes you up? Try to get your partner or a relative to help you get a break so you can get some sleep. (Easier said than done, I know)

      And finally, the coffee issue. Ask your doctor how much coffee he/she thinks would be safe for you to drink. Many things have caffeine such as coffee, soft-drinks, pain medication, tea, chocolate, etc. If you're drinking coffee and getting 300mg of caffeine then you drink some tea with your Ben and Jerry's ice cream, you could easily have 400 to 500mg of caffeine a day.

      Caffeine is a stimulant and can increase your heartrate or give you the jitter's. If taken responsibly and with your doctors blessing, Caffine can help you stay alert and not hurt your baby.

  18. QUESTION:
    Why does my toddler snore? & why so loud?
    Hes only 20 months. I am very concern. He's been having alot of flem lately. Im thinking about taking him to the doctors.

    • ANSWER:
      Toddlers should not be snoring as you describe.

      If your baby was a premature birth, he may have some issues about lung development.

      Toddlers are assessed differently that adults for sleep apnea. Also know, that if your toddler is have oxygen de-saturation, some studies are linking this to ADHD. A toddler should also sleep a great per centage in active sleep. This is where he will be growing.

      Get him assessed.

  19. QUESTION:
    Sleep Apnea in toddlers?
    My son will be 2 years old next month. He just had his tonsils and adenoids removed on Tuesday due to "obstructive sleep apnea". The ENT that gave him the diagnosis and did the surgery didn't do a sleep study, but he did have the symptoms. While in recovery after the T&A, he fell asleep in my arms. His O2 sat dropped to 89. The nurse had me reposition him, which woke him up and brought his O2 sat back up to 98-99. We were then taken to his room (he had to spend the night in the hospital since he was so young). His O2 sat remained good until he went to sleep for the night. It dropped back down to 89 and the nurse came in and had me put the head of bed up...that woke him up and brought his sat back up. She left the room, he went back to sleep. It went down and up a few more times, and then it went down to 87 and the nurse came in and put O2 on him. That happened right at shift change. The night nurse came in and turned off the monitor so I have no idea what it was all night long. I assume that it was because of the sleep apnea and that he did that all the time at home also. But, now how do I know that he's not doing it since the surgery?? Do any of you have experience with toddlers and sleep apnea? Did the T&A help?

    • ANSWER:
      It's very common for the anesthesia to have after effects of sleep apnea for the first 24 hours or so, and worse than before the surgery. The main two symptoms of it are if they stop breathing for a few seconds, and then gasp in their next breath, and snoring loudly. They're also more restless with sleep apnea.

  20. QUESTION:
    Sleep Apnea in toddlers?
    My son will be 2 years old next month. He just had his tonsils and adenoids removed on Tuesday due to "obstructive sleep apnea". The ENT that gave him the diagnosis and did the surgery didn't do a sleep study, but he did have the symptoms. While in recovery after the T&A, he fell asleep in my arms. His O2 sat dropped to 89. The nurse had me reposition him, which woke him up and brought his O2 sat back up to 98-99. We were then taken to his room (he had to spend the night in the hospital since he was so young). His O2 sat remained good until he went to sleep for the night. It dropped back down to 89 and the nurse came in and had me put the head of bed up...that woke him up and brought his sat back up. She left the room, he went back to sleep. It went down and up a few more times, and then it went down to 87 and the nurse came in and put O2 on him. That happened right at shift change. The night nurse came in and turned off the monitor so I have no idea what it was all night long. I assume that it was because of the sleep apnea and that he did that all the time at home also. But, now how do I know that he's not doing it since the surgery?? Do any of you have experience with toddlers and sleep apnea? Did the T&A help? Should he be seeing a specialist?

    • ANSWER:
      I would think an ENT IS the right specialist to be seeing, however, if you don't feel you are getting your questions answered, seek out a second opinion. Is there a large hospital/children's hospital near where you live? I would take my child there rather than the regular office doc type ENT. A teaching hospital is an excellent route to go.

      Can I ask why you suspected apnea in the first place and took your two year old to the doc?

  21. QUESTION:
    toddler snoring has just started?
    My sonis asleep and he has just started snoring.I have never heardhim snorebefore. He sweats very easily and is a little overweight even though he is very active. What are the symptoms of sleep apnea? this worries me because my grandfather died in his sleep because of it and both of my parents have it. I know just snoring one night is not a symptom, but i am curious. If it continues and he has other symptoms, i will be sure to take him to the dr. He also does not have a cold so that would not be causing it.

    • ANSWER:
      I would mention it to the doctor and let them know your concern. It could be a larger issue and he may need to see an E.N.T (ear, nose and throat) doctor. Better to catch it while he is young.

  22. QUESTION:
    My 2yr old snores really badly, is this something i should be concerned with?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be sleep apnea, which studies have shown to have negative effects on toddlers' development. I recommend seeing an ENT about it. There are various things it could be but at least consult with your pediatrician, if not an ENT.

      My similar experience:
      My son also had very bad snoring/gasping in his sleep, and when I told his pediatrician about it, she noticed that he had enormous tonsils. We visited an ENT who confirmed that it was obstructive sleep apnea (he was even napping at the time of the appointment so the doctor heard him snoring, which helped). We had them removed a week after he turned two and it has been like night and day! Now he sleeps silently and peacefully! It was a great decision for us.

  23. QUESTION:
    Can sleep apnea reoccur even after an infant has "out grown" it?
    My son was on an apnea monitor from the time he was 4 months old until 9 months. He stopped having episodes so they took him off the monitor and said he probably just outgrew it. Now he is almost 22 months old and the last couple of weeks he's been having issues sleeping at night. Waking up 4 and 5 times a night, scared out of his mind and coming running and screaming into my bedroom. I thought something in his room was scaring him. Until last night anyways. I sat with him next to his bed for an hour trying to calm him back into sleep. He finally fell asleep and I was sitting with my hand on his back and at the same time I noticed he wasn't breathing he woke up with a start and started crying all panicky. I sat with him until he fell asleep again to see if it happened again and sure enough about 10 minutes after he fell asleep he stopped breathing for about 10 seconds and woke up freaking out.

    I'm wondering if maybe he never actually outgrew it and the monitor just wasn't picking it up anymore. I say that because the monitor wasn't set to go off until he ceased breathing for 20 seconds.

    Anyways, I'm going to try to get him in to the doctor next week but have any of you that had infants with sleep apnea had it reoccur as a toddler?

    Thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      before his apnea may have been due to an immature nature of a premature infant. I have never heard of it at 22 months. Now he may have some short of sleep apnea due to obstruction. How are his tonsils. There is also something called central sleep apnea.

      visit sleepnet.com and ask your question on the child/infant message board.

      Best wishes

  24. QUESTION:
    Could this be sleep apnea?
    0I've had a problem for the last few weeks where I get enough sleep *(9 hours a sleep every night) yet I wake up still feeling tired durign the day. My doc thinks its just stress or my body getting over the inner ear infection..Could this be sleep apnea..doctor doesn't seem to think so because I don't wake up in the middle of the night gasping or choking. Once im asleep Im usually out til morning..I don't know if i snore because I live alone with toddlers...Is it prolly just stress since I don't wake up in the middle of the night?
    I am slightly overweight
    Please be kind. I have a horrible anxiety issue, have been diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder and I am panicing really bad about this...

    • ANSWER:
      It doesn't sound like sleep apnea at all. If you sleep through the night and get 9 hours of sleep it isn't a sleep disorder. If you are tired during the day it could be many things. Maybe stress, getting over an infection, low iron or something else? Ask your doctor to do a blood test and check your vitamin levels, including D, B12 and iron. Do you take a multiple vitamin? That could help. Try getting a little exercise and maybe cut out a few calories. It will help with the tiredness. Plus, it could just be because you have toddlers and they wear you out! LOL
      Don't worry.

  25. QUESTION:
    Could this be sleep apnea?
    I've had a problem for the last few weeks where I get enough sleep *(9 hours a sleep every night) yet I wake up still feeling tired durign the day. My doc thinks its just stress or my body getting over the inner ear infection..Could this be sleep apnea..doctor doesn't seem to think so because I don't wake up in the middle of the night gasping or choking. Once im asleep Im usually out til morning..I don't know if i snore because I live alone with toddlers...Is it prolly just stress since I don't wake up in the middle of the night?
    I am slightly overweight

    • ANSWER:
      Oh yes - Unfortunately sleep apnea is pretty dangerous stuff and lots of people can have it for years and not have ANY idea that they do. It causes all manner of problems including congestive heart failure and death.

      Usually it goes on for a long time - you find that you've kicked all the covers off your bed - you're awake a lot during the night. But it comes on gradually enough so you don't take it too seriously.

      The trouble is that it's expensive as hell to get tested for - you have to go to some sleep clinic thing and sleep for them. This isn't too bad if you're endanger of dieing of it - but just to find out if you have it - then it's expensive. Then the machine that helps you breathe is a bunch of dough - but insurance will pay for it if you have any.

      Lots and lots of people get this - they get tested - they get the machine - and then they don't use it. They say, "I'd rather be dead than use that thing".... And some of them get their wish.

      One way of testing it for cheap is to go to an oxygen supply place - and ask them for an overnight oxygen test. it's only about . You put a thing on your finger and go to sleep - and this shows your oxygen levels all night. Then they send that data to your doctor who say, "Holy Cow! I've never seen anything this bad" - or - "You're fine - don't worry".

  26. QUESTION:
    Could this be sleep apnea?
    I've had a problem for the last few weeks where I get enough sleep *(9 hours a sleep every night) yet I wake up still feeling tired durign the day. My doc thinks its just stress or my body getting over the inner ear infection..Could this be sleep apnea..doctor doesn't seem to think so because I don't wake up in the middle of the night gasping or choking. Once im asleep Im usually out til morning..I don't know if i snore because I live alone with toddlers...Is it prolly just stress since I don't wake up in the middle of the night?
    I am slightly overweight

    • ANSWER:
      It could be many things. Most people with sleep apnea are not aware that they are waking up, so it sounds as though your doctor isn't well informed on this issue. It could be other health issues as well, ranging from vitamin deficiencies to anemia to nocturnal seizures to depression. I would be seeking out a second opinion.

      All the best.

  27. QUESTION:
    Does my toddler have sleep apnea?
    My 16 month old has never been a good night sleeper. He sleeps a couple of hours and then wakes up briefly. It used to be for a bottle, but now its either for a drink or he just sits up whining and then goes back to sleep. I noticed last night that he holds his breath while he is sleeping and then slowly lets it out making a moaning sound. His dad does this if he is really tired, too. Does this sound like a form of sleep apnea or just a normal kid thing? I'm wondering if he is waking up b/c of this. He has his check up at the end of July and I'm gonna mention it to the pediatrician. Do you know if they would do a sleep test on him? Just looking for mom's or dad's who may have experienced this. Thanks in advance!!

    • ANSWER:
      Not trying to scare you or anything but yes this is a form of sleep apnea and I would NOT wait until July to have him checked in fact I would call them tomorrow and tell them you want him to be seen this week.

      My son has the same thing and we took him in and they ran a bunch of tests on him and then gave us instructions on what to do and he is better he still has nights that he forgets to take a breathe but it is only briefly.

      You can go to www.google.com and type in sleep apnea and it will bring up different pages of information or you can go to www.webmd and type in sleep apnea in children and it will also bring up information for you.

  28. QUESTION:
    Prevacid causing sleep disruption in my baby.?
    My 7 week old has been on Prevacid for 2 weeks, for the last week she has been unable to sleep well, only 30min at a time for most of the day. I read that this happens sometimes but can go away, has anyone had this happen to their baby.

    • ANSWER:
      You may want to ask your pediatrician to see if you can place her to sleep on her stomach. You may want to see how she sleeps on your chest first before putting her in a crib. Also, you may want to get her checked for sleep apnea which is easily treated with a CPAP (continous positive airway pressure) mask and easily checked for by a Sleep Study. If you think this might be the cause but your doctor says "it's no big deal" I'd say get a second opinion. In older children sleep apnea is usually treated by taking the tonsils and adenoids out but in babies it's typically treated with a CPAP or by putting them to sleep on their stomachs. BTW, back sleep causes motor skills delays, makes Acid Reflux worse, causes plagiocephaly (flat head syndrome), causes wry neck (Torticollis), makes infant colic worse, increases sleep apnea, increases awakenings, and decreases total sleep time. Also, sleep apnea can hurt learning and memory if it happens for a long time. Untreated sleep apnea in toddlers causes symptoms very similar to ADHD and children with sleep apnea are often misdiagnosed with ADHD. BTW, before 1992 over 90% of parents put their children to sleep on their stomachs or sides. All the best!

      http://www.petitionspot.com/petitions/SIDSandPlagiocephaly

  29. QUESTION:
    Does this sound like sleep apnea?
    First, my toddler is 2 and 4 months and I have noticed before that he snores sometimes. Last night for some strange reason I wanted him to sleep with me instead of in his bed like usual. I woke at 4 something because I had been grinding my teeth. I looked over and the dog was on the bed which is unusual in itself and she was staring at my son and crying. I looked at him and he was laying on his back and I couldn't see him breathing or hear him breathing and I jumped up and put my hand on his chest and didn't feel him breathing and I shook his shoulders and he jumped and started breathing and rolled over on his stomach. I just layed there the rest of the time until my alarm went off listening to be sure he was breathing. There wasn't anything on the bed to suffocate him the covers were kicked off of him most of the night, he always does that. He had his own small pillow that he always uses and he was on his back, not face down. I mean it scared the crap out of me. I am waiting for the doctors office to open so I can call them and talk to them about this but does this seem like it could be something like sleep apnea? I am going to be scared to let him sleep in his room now...

    • ANSWER:
      My son had sleep apnea and the only way to be sure is to take him to a doctor, but that is exactly what happened to us that made us suspect apnea. He was a lot younger and ended up having his tonsils removed as that was the cause, but yes, I think it might be apnea.

  30. QUESTION:
    Sleep apnea in babies...?
    Does anyone have any information about sleep apnea in babies? I have a feeling my daughter may have this, i have looked at some web sites about it but would like to know from anyone who has had personal experience.
    Im a little concerned about going to my doc as im sure he already thinks im a neurotic mother, lol
    I would like to know what symptoms your baby had other than the stopping breathing?
    What did you say when approaching your doctor about it?
    What did the doctor do to determine whether it was sleep apnea or not?

    Thanks
    im not 100% sure that she actually stops breathing but she takes a sudden deep breath in sometimes which can indicate that they may have for a few seconds!??
    She is nearly 11 months by the way!
    Thank you Dylans Mommy that really helped, i think im gonna make an appointment and mention it to her doc and see what he says. I will keep u updated! xx

    • ANSWER:
      I'm almost in shock reading this - I pretty much could've just posted this word-for-word!! Except my son is going to be a year this month, not 11 months. .. Give me a second and I'll give you all the info!! I just switched doctors, and I'm going to address this issue with the new one. His doctors now are horrible and also think i'm a neurotic mother , LOL :)

      OKay, according to What to expect, the toddler years and "Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child:
      The major cause of sleep apnea/ breathing problems at nighttime is due to enlarged adenoids and tonsils. These can be enlarged because of allergies, or even from genetics. (I have had both mine taken out, because I used to stop breathing when I was little, and i'd wake up screaming and gasping for air.)

      A study was done with children who had trouble breathing during sleep, adn the following problems were observed in addition to troubled breathing/ snoring:

      "breath holding, "stopping breathing" during sleep;
      frequent nighttime awakening
      breathing through an open mouth
      sleeping sitting up
      excessive daytime sleepiness
      difficulty concentrating
      bed-wetting
      decreased energy, poor eating, weight loss
      morning headaches
      hyperactivity.

      "Some parents have also described their child's apparent 'forgetting to breathe' during sleep. Their child's chest is heaving, but during those moments of complete airway obstruction, airflow is stopped. These peirods are called APNEA. With only partial airway obstruction, though, excessively loud snoring throughout the night is the result."

      When discussing the sleep related breathing disorders further, again due to the enlarged adenoids and tonsils/ airway obstruction, many things can affect the child's overall life - including ADHD, concentrating, lack of quality sleep, overeating/ undereating, hyperactive, irritable. below average school performance, etc. However, with the surgery/ removal of adenoids - these poor qualities can be reversed almost immediately!! So that's good news.

      I'd definitely ask to be referred to a pediatric sleep specialist, or even an allergist/ ENT. If your daughter is stopping breathing in her sleep - this needs to be evaluated and IMMEDIATELY. She probably wakes up a lot too, which is her natural alarms going off to wake her up so that she takes a breath. It would be very dangerous if she didn't wake up to breathe!

      Good luck though - trust your instincts - and just know someone else out there is in your same position! hope i helped, sorry for the novel!

  31. QUESTION:
    Could this be sleep apnea?
    0I've had a problem for the last few weeks where I get enough sleep *(9 hours a sleep every night) yet I wake up still feeling tired durign the day. My doc thinks its just stress or my body getting over the inner ear infection..Could this be sleep apnea..doctor doesn't seem to think so because I don't wake up in the middle of the night gasping or choking. Once im asleep Im usually out til morning..I don't know if i snore because I live alone with toddlers...Is it prolly just stress since I don't wake up in the middle of the night?
    I am slightly overweight
    Please be kind. I have a horrible anxiety issue, have been diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder and I am panicing really bad about this...

    • ANSWER:
      Yea, it doesn't sound like it.

      Sounds like you need a new mattress and some relaxation techniques. It's not about how long you sleep, but how deep you sleep.

  32. QUESTION:
    Sleep apnea in a toddler?
    My daughter just recently got out of the hospital due to a bout with pnumonia. She is OK now, but her pediatrician said if this occurs again, he will look into the possibility of her being asmatic. I have noticed on several occasions in the past that while she is sleeping, she seems to stop breathing, only to start again several seconds later. It happened again last night as I was holding her in my arms, and I literally had to shake her to get her breating again. Have you heard of this with other 22 month old children?? Any advice is appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      my son had sleep apneas when he was younger - and aparently it is not uncommon with everyone to have times where we stop breathing when we sleep.

      I suggest you contact your gp and express your concerns - I was given a machine that went under his bedding and when he stopped breathing the machine bleeped. (usually that started him breathing again)

  33. QUESTION:
    My 4 weeks old baby wakes up crying every 10-15 minutes when she sleeps, day and night. Why? Normal?
    She gets fed every 3 hours. After feeding, she usually is happy for 1/2 - one hours then she gets tired and we rock her to sleep and put her in the basinessnet. Then in a few mins, she gets up and cries, if you pick her up, she falls asleep again and the procedure repeats itself. If you let her cry, she will..... well, cry like crazy. What's wrong? BTW, when did you start the cry it out method?

    • ANSWER:
      No, that's not normal. You may want to ask your pediatrician to see if you can place her to sleep on her stomach. You may want to see how she sleeps on your chest first before putting her in a crib. Also, you may want to get her checked for sleep apnea which is easily treated with a CPAP (continous positive airway pressure) mask and easily checked for by a Sleep Study. If you think this might be the cause but your doctor says "it's no big deal" I'd say get a second opinion. In older children sleep apnea is usually treated by taking the tonsils and adenoids out but in babies it's typically treated with a CPAP or by putting them to sleep on their stomachs. BTW, back sleep causes motor skills delays, makes Acid Reflux worse, causes plagiocephaly (flat head syndrome), causes wry neck (Torticollis), makes infant colic worse, increases sleep apnea, increases awakenings, and decreases total sleep time. Also, sleep apnea can hurt learning and memory if it happens for a long time. Untreated sleep apnea in toddlers causes symptoms very similar to ADHD and children with sleep apnea are often misdiagnosed with ADHD. BTW, before 1992 over 90% of parents put their children to sleep on their stomachs or sides. All the best!

      http://www.petitionspot.com/petitions/SIDSandPlagiocephaly

  34. QUESTION:
    What are common causes of extreme fatigue besides sleep apnea?
    For the last month or two I've been feeling really tired and actually failed my last qaurter at my college because of it. I am single parent with 2 toddlers I get up around 8 am and lately have felt horribly tired all day and am in bed by 10..Getting enough sleep yet really tired. My doc did blood work and checked alot of stuff and everything was normal. thursday night i went in for a sleep study and now im waiting on results for it. Now im just worried if it doesn't come back as sleep apnea then what could it be? I don't know if i snore bc i live alone with 2 young kids...BY THE WAY...I am 29 years old and am overweight 5'2" and 205 lbs.

    • ANSWER:
      Your weight could have a lot to do with it.
      Fatigue doesn't cause apnea...but apnea can cause fatigue. Wait for the results of the sleep study

  35. QUESTION:
    Constantly feel groggy all day?...maybe sleep apnea?
    I am calling my doctor tomorrow to make an appointment so you all don't need to tell me to do so. I am just asking this started last week on Thursday. I took some sleeping pills because of my insomnia I have not been drinking alcohol and Thursday I woke up feeling groggy ok normal I have a toddler that likes to climb into bed with me in the middle of the night without me waking up and I also have slightly high blood pressure and I am obese. I stopped taking the sleeping pills for Friday night to see if I was just feeling groggy from that nope the same perpetual grogginess came back and has been again and again no matter how little or how much sleep I get and always groggy all day. I don't feel like I am having trouble breathing at night and I just started two days ago (tonight will be my third night) an antidepressant called Remeron (Mirtazapine) for my depression (I have bipolar disorder). Could this be a sure sign or symptom of sleep apnea? Or something else I had vertigo last year in december and it does not feel like that just hard to keep my eyes open, sleepy, groggy more groggy than sleepy, blurred vision, higher irritability etc. Thoughts anyone?

    • ANSWER:
      go to the doctor....get it checked out

  36. QUESTION:
    What are common causes of extreme fatigue besides sleep apnea?
    For the last month or two I've been feeling really tired and actually failed my last qaurter at my college because of it. I am single parent with 2 toddlers I get up around 8 am and lately have felt horribly tired all day and am in bed by 10..Getting enough sleep yet really tired. My doc did blood work and checked alot of stuff and everything was normal. thursday night i went in for a sleep study and now im waiting on results for it. Now im just worried if it doesn't come back as sleep apnea then what could it be? I don't know if i snore bc i live alone with 2 young kids...BY THE WAY...I am 29 years old and am overweight 5'2" and 205 lbs.

    • ANSWER:

  37. QUESTION:
    What are common causes of extreme fatigue besides sleep apnea?
    For the last month or two I've been feeling really tired and actually failed my last qaurter at my college because of it. I am single parent with 2 toddlers I get up around 8 am and lately have felt horribly tired all day and am in bed by 10..Getting enough sleep yet really tired. My doc did blood work and checked alot of stuff and everything was normal. thursday night i went in for a sleep study and now im waiting on results for it. Now im just worried if it doesn't come back as sleep apnea then what could it be? I don't know if i snore bc i live alone with 2 young kids...BY THE WAY...I am 29 years old and am overweight 5'2" and 205 lbs.

    • ANSWER:
      Common causes are. Stress, Common colds/sicknesses and a few other things but Stress would be up there.

      Hope i helped

  38. QUESTION:
    Am I the only one who has a toddler (16 months) who DOESN'T sleep through the night?
    Reading these questions/answers, i think i am..........

    Im not complaining and im not looking for 'suggestions' on how to get her to sleep through. i am simply wondering how old your child is and if they sleep through the night.

    • ANSWER:
      Ha!

      No mommies lie because having a child that doesn't sleep through makes you a bad mommy!

      I have a 17 month old AND a 3 year old and NEITHER sleeps through the night. Though for two nights last week the 3 year old choose to stay in his bed when he woke up. (his choice, I know eventually he will stop climbing in with us and he is welcome as long as he needs it but its nice to know I'm not insane and that he won't stay in there till I kick him out screaming and crying *lol*)

      http://www.kellymom.com/parenting/sleep/sleepstudies.html

      Armstrong KL, Quinn RA & Dadds MR. The sleep patterns of normal children.
      Medical Journal of Australia 1994 Aug 1;161(3):202-6.

      The above study is the definitive work on sleeping habits of (Australian) children to 38 months. The researchers surveyed 3269 parents, with a 96.5% response rate, over a one week period. The parents had to report on their child's sleeping habits over the past 24 hours, plus answer a few questions related to their perceptions of their child's sleep behavior.

      What did they find?

      * There is a wide range of normal childhood sleep behavior.
      * Circadian rhythm is not well established until four months of age.
      * Daytime sleep becomes less regular with increasing age, the most marked reduction in length occurs around 3 months of age. However, a surprising 11% under 3 months of age don't have a daytime sleep every day.
      * Frequent night waking that disturbs parents is common from 4-12 months (12.7% disturb their parents 3 or more times every night).
      * Night time settling requires more parental input from 18 months.
      * Nearly a third of parents have a significant problem with their child's sleep behavior.
      * Sleeping through the night: 71.4% did this on at least one occasion by 3 months of age, but many of these relapse into more frequent waking in the 4 to 12 month period. It is not until after 24 months that regular night waking (requiring attention) becomes much less common.

      Although this study did not address breastfeeding, it is relevant because a lack of understanding of "normal" sleep patterns can lead to supplementing, early solids, belief there is not enough milk, etc. The authors claim it also leads to misdiagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) and overuse of sedative medication. A worrying 31% of 25-38 month-old children were disciplined (mostly smacking) to get them to settle. 27% of parents let their children cry, 11% at less than one month

      http://www.kathydettwyler.org/detsleepthrough.html

      The same is true of sleeping. Human children are designed to be sleeping with their parents. The sense of touch is the most important sense to primates, along with sight. Young primates are carried on their mother's body and sleep with her for years after birth, often until well after weaning. The expected pattern is for mother and child to sleep together, and for child to be able to nurse whenever they want during the night. Normal, healthy, breastfed and co-sleeping children do not sleep "through the night" (say 7-9 hours at a stretch) until they are 3-4 years old, and no longer need night nursing. I repeat -- this is NORMAL and HEALTHY. Dr. James McKenna's research on co-sleeping clearly shows the dangers of solitary sleeping in young infants, who slip into abnormal patterns of very deep sleep from which it is very difficult for them to rouse themselves when they experience an episode of apnea (stop breathing).

      http://www.drjen4kids.com/soap%20box/sleep%20stuff.htm

      The stages of sleep, and there are more than just stage 4 and REM, are things we go through each night, but we go through them in cycles. Every 90 minutes of so we actually wake up, check out our surroundings and go back to sleep if everything feels safe. Awakening about 5-8 times a night is normal [for adults]

      [...]

      Of course, if I did my job earlier, you now understand that nobody sleeps through the night. Interesting tidbit: about 80% of parents of one year olds identify their children as having "sleep problems." Eighty percent? Maybe we have an expectation for our children that is not based on human physiology and is therefore not realistic. Maybe they don't really have a sleep problem.

      http://www.askdrsears.com/faq/sl15.asp

      This is a common concern, and a common argument against co-sleeping. The answer to your question is: "Yes, he will learn to fall asleep by himself." BUT, it will probably be much later than you are anticipating. Many parents have an unrealistic expectation about when their infants should be able to fall asleep by themselves. I hear people say six months, or one year. In reality, it's usually between 2 and 4 years. Our four-year-old still needs to be parented to sleep. This is not a problem for us, he still needs the "snuggle time".

  39. QUESTION:
    sleep problems toddler?
    Two days ago DD started choking/ coughing in her sleep. When we tried tow ake her we couldnt. She was so lethargic, that we had to splas some water on her to wake. Last night she slept with us again and she slept through the whole night with out waking up. I changed her diaper and she went to bed. I tickled her feet. She moved around and smiled but still she slept. My husband said he watched her sleep and said she would pause breathing and then return. (That makes me think sleep apnea) However what is going on with the refusual of waking up. She doesnt toss or turn. She normally does. Her sleep patterns have changed. Any ideas? Shes 2 by the way

    • ANSWER:
      I agree.

      If our pediatrician wants a sleep study done..use this site to find an accredited AASM facility that is kind to kids.

      http://www.sleepeducation.com/find-a-center

  40. QUESTION:
    Sleepy all the time, even though I get enough rest. Can anyone help??
    I am 29 years old and a stay at home mother. I get about 7-8 hours of restful sleep a night (no sleep apnea) but I still feel sleepy throughout the day. Last time I went to the doc (6 months ago) blood sugar and thyroid were normal, and I take my women's vitamin with Iron faithfully. I limit caffeine and sugar and drink good stuff like decaf tea and water.

    Is it possible I need more sleep than I'm getting? When I take an afternoon nap I feel better but then I don't get my housework done while my toddlers are sleeping! I hate wasting part of my afternoon on a nap. Any suggestions on what might be causing my sleepiness?

    Thanks.

    P.S. I am not pregnant - checked that already. LOL

    • ANSWER:
      How old is your mattress? A better bed can make the same hours of sleep feel so much more restful. I sleep soundly whether I crash on the couch or the bed, but I feel a lot more tired the next day when I slept on the couch. If your mattress is eight years old, it might be time for a new one.

      I don't think you'd have a problem with a little caffeine in the late morning, as long as you don't overdo it, but medical opinions vary on that--try it and do what feels right for your body.

      Depression, boredom, or lack of exercise could be factors, but I doubt it--you would have figured it out if it were one of those. I'm betting that you need a new bed.

  41. QUESTION:
    Baby wont sleep in crib?
    I have a 6 weeks old daughter and fir the 1st couple weeks she would sleep in her bassinet fine, but now she wont sleep anywhere besides with me my question is..is this going to last forever or will she eventually beable to sleep in her own bed, and is there anythign i can do to make her sleep in it. And please dont give me all the crap about how dangerous it is for her to sleep with me..ive been doing it for 5 weeks, and shes perfectly safe,as long as i keep my bed safe for her.

    • ANSWER:
      Firstly co-sleeping is BEYOND perfectly safe (as long as you baby proof your bed) it has been PROVEN to reduce the risk of SIDS and the risk of mental illness as an adult. It also reduces the frequency of apnea.

      My son moved on his own to his crib at 6 months, I would still bring him back in bed after I was in bed because he nursed a lot during the night. But he flat out refused to fall asleep in bed, and preferred the crib. Then around 8 months he moved back in to the bed. He was teething and in pain among other things. He has moved out for two shorter bouts since. He is 13 months and he still sleeps with us. That's part me, and part him. (He still nurses constantly, day and night. We're working on it but he is a snacker and if stretch his feedings too far apart he spits up -which probably makes him uncomfortable particularly at night)

      Honestly at this point I wouldn't be trying to force her into the crib. You can lay her in there, particularly for naps. But if she cries pick her up. One time my son looked like he was going to start staying in the crib all night, I decided to try some no-cry sleep training (big mistake) so then we were both tired and cranky and I had a huge work-at-home project due so one day he wouldn't nap at all, and I needed some time to work so I let him cry in his crib for 45 minutes. He wouldn't even go in his room for over a month after that.

      Turning the crib into an unhappy place doesn't benefit anyone. So keep it fun, keep gently trying to get her in there if that is what you want. But really forcing it doesn't get you anywhere.

      And seriously don't worry about what *may* become a problem in the future. Worry about what is a problem NOW. Not sleeping NOW is a problem. What happens in the future happens then. And some of the worst toddler's for climbing in with mommy and daddy NEVER co-slept. I really wonder if one has to do with the other at all.

  42. QUESTION:
    Am I taking advantage of my partner?
    We've been together for 2 years I've worked a total of 16 months I have 2 toddlers and decided to stay home to care for them because of daycare cost. I use to work weekends and my partner used to care for them but he failed to be responsible. I'll come home and the house looks totally different from how I left it a few occasions my kids were hurt due to lack of supervision. My partner has sleep apnea and slleps all morning so the kids were ripping and running through the house so I couldnt take it no more and I quit my job and things are less stressful. Now he feels I am taking advantage of him. He makes 37,000.00 a year and has 2 new cars,expensive electronics, and he splurges all the time so I figured it would'nt hurt to stay home and care for our little ones for a bit.On top of that when we first met, he told me he wanted me to be a stay at home mom and now I am actually doing it he's complaining. I don't ask him for much but diapers,food,and sometimes out to a restaurant.
    For the record we do have a child together.

    • ANSWER:
      No you are not taking advantage of anything. If anything I would send them to day care and get a job so he could then complain about the coast and I would tell him what he would prefer. Let him see how nice it is to have you clean the house and have dinner for him every night. Take that away and he will want it back.

  43. QUESTION:
    Another Snoring Survey?
    I got back good results from my last survey so here's another.
    Now I know people think just men and overweight people snore and have sleep apnea but do any of you young slender women snore? I mean snoring that shocks people who hear you or shoked you when you found out you snored or have sleep apnea. Do any of you gasp or choke for air and thats how you found out or did someone tell you and you denied it that it could be you?

    • ANSWER:
      So embarrassing. Why are you asking? Why am I answering? I've been told that I keep him awake all night. He won't nudge me.

      I thought only big fat people have snoring problems. I'm slim. Recently, I held my sister's 1 y/o toddler as she slept. We listened intently to verify the babe's tiny snores. She baby-snored lightly, like her skinny fashion model mama, who snores loudly. So cute.

  44. QUESTION:
    Why do I get sick so often? Weak immune system?
    Here is a bit about my history of illness. When I was a toddler, I often ended up in the hospital sick. This is normal I guess, but it has never stopped since then. I would always get sick a lot more than other people even right till today. When I get sick, I get sick for two weeks at least once a year on top of other sicknesses and other people are sick for a few days. This has caused me problems with my workplace because they think I fake it. I am one of the most honest and straight shooting people you could ever meet. I have no reason to lie about it. Why would anyone? If they weren't sick, why not be there? I get sick more than regular people but I get compared to regular people. I take care of myself for the most part. I walk at least 5 miles a week. I know other people who eat crap food and they never get sick whereas it doesn't matter what I eat, I get sick. I could spend a week treating my body really good and then I get sick. I have never been able to have a full year without being sick at least 6 times minimum. I know that stress can cause the body to also get sick. This has happened to me too. My brain wants to keep going despite the stress, but the body stops me. I have been hospitalized twice for a couple of weeks at a time with intestinal/stomach problems which have left specialists mystified. They think I am faking it. Why would I fake something like that just so I could waste 4 weeks out of my life agonizing? I've also been getting numbness in my legs to the point where it is hard to walk for an hour or two. I also get lower back pain on my left side. I was told in 2004 that I had scoliosis. But anyway, I get sick a lot. I have learned not to trust feeling good because it never lasts more than a couple of days. No doctor seems to know what is wrong with me. This illness has caused me to become depressed on occasion as well, since I never know how I am going to feel from one day to the next. I have taken vitamins, exercised, and done all of that. I do have sleep apnea as well but would that cause it? Still I get this. Is there anything out there to describe this? i have taken all the blood tests and they always tell me that I am fine. I did have mono though once, and remember how sick I got then too. I was in the hospital for a month during high school. If you know anyone like me, please tell me what they have. This is a major inconvenience.

    • ANSWER:
      Since you have sleep apnea; do you use a cpap machine?

      Lack of sleep can cause your immune system to be compromised. It will also cause you to have less deep sleep; which will provide less time for you to heal during sleep.

  45. QUESTION:
    psychology 201 question help?
    the doctor announced, the patient was unresponsive , but is now conscious , by consciousness , he mean at state of awareness
    True or false
    at a camping sleepover, you discovered your buddy chuck sleepwalking. you deduced that during this episode , chuck was likely in the deepest part of non rem sleep
    T or F
    your friend kevin has a diagnosis of sleep apnea , this is the sleep disorder wherein individuals have a hard time falling asleep
    T or F
    babies are born with with many relexes intact
    T or F
    new born can't imitate facial expression
    T or F
    easy child generally has a positive mood
    T or F
    your toddler has emerged into piaget's preoperational stage of cognitive delopment , you now expect that she acquired reversibility
    T or F

    • ANSWER:
      T

      T (A common misconception is that sleepwalking is acting out the physical movements within a dream, but in fact, sleepwalking occurs earlier on in the night when rapid eye movement (REM), or the "dream stage" of sleep, has not yet occurred.[citation needed] REM behavior disorder is the proper term for the condition that occurs when a person "acts out" her dream. Sleepwalking can affect people of any age. It generally occurs when an individual moves during slow wave sleep or SWS (during stage 3 or 4 of slow wave sleep deep sleep) (Horne, 1992; Kales & Kales, 1975). -- Wikipedia

      F (Sleep apnea (or sleep apnoea in British English) is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep. ) - Wiki.

      T (babies acquire some reflexes during the gestation period. when they are born,many of them continue to exist for some time)

      T

      T (one of the defining criteria of easy child)

      F (reversibility emerges in concrete operational stage.)

  46. QUESTION:
    Any one else's baby a snorer?
    OK, I already posted this in the toddler section, but I seem to get more responses here in newborn and baby, and lots of you have more than one child, so here goes...We have noticed my son has snored heavily since about 12 months, he is now 15 months. Sometimes he also coughs in his sleep. He sleeps a lot,like kid his age should, but he is generally a really happy kid and plays pretty hard so he doesn't seem to be hurting for sleep. However, I have noticed lately he wakes up still seeming pretty tired for a 1/2 hour or so, and he frequently wakes briefly in the wee hours of the night, bawls for a minute and is back to sleep before I can check on him.
    Oh, yeah he is prone to colds and allergies, had to have tubes at 7 months, he had awful recurring ear infections, he almost always has a runny nose-our pediatricians still disagree whether its allergies, some blame it all on daycare, but he has had a runny nose almost from day one. I suffer from allergies and we live in an area known for allergens.
    He turned 15 months on March 27, and has 16 teeth, so if teething make your nose run, maybe thats a factor? I know there's disagreement on that one, too. Oh, and he is tiny weight wise, average height but below the chart for weight, so its not a weight issue.
    Sorry this is so long, just wondering if anyone had an experience with nsoring or sleep apnea in their little ones, what were the symptoms, outcomes, etc
    He has his 15 month checkup in 11 days, so I am planning on addressing it with his pediatrician.
    Thanks.
    The tubes cleared up his ear infections, thankfully, but yes, he seems to have perpetual colds, even though he was breastfed the first year.
    He doesn't wake every night, but at least maybe 2X/week.
    The tubes cleared up his ear infections, thankfully, but yes, he seems to have perpetual colds, even though he was breastfed the first year.
    He doesn't wake every night, but at least maybe 2X/week.
    Thanks guys.
    Since he already has an ENT for his ears, I went ahead and got an appointment for him tommorow with the specialist-I figured the doctor would just refer him so I'd skip the middle man!
    I feel much better!

    • ANSWER:
      Bring this up at his check-up. Snoring in an infant can be a classic sign of sleep apnea. You said he wakes frequently at the night?He's prone to infections, what about sore throats/tonsillitis? Those can all be symptoms of sleep apnea. Make sure to bring up everything you mentioned here with your son's DR. Good luck!

  47. QUESTION:
    Toddler Wakes Up At Night?
    My son is almost 2.5 years old and he wakes up a lot at night. Very rarely do my husband or I have to go in by him - he will just wake up and talk to himself and futz around in bed. The thing is, he will sometimes stay up for well over an hour. It never really bothered us before but we have a new baby coming soon and I don't want him to wake up the new baby in the middle of the night. Any ideas why he does this, or how to fix it? He doesn't have any sleep problems such as sleep apnea or anything. He had his tonsils and adenoids removed when he turned 2. He seems well rested in the AM. He takes a PM nap but nothing excessive. Has anyone else had this experience, or can anyone offer any suggestions? Thanks!
    He is not doing anything else odd - no hitting or scratching himself or trying to harm himself. He wakes up happy when he gets up in the middle of the night, and keeps himself entertained until he falls asleep again.

    • ANSWER:
      my toddler is doing that now but she is teething (getting her first set of molars) but shes waking up because of the pain so it sounds different from your situation. Could just be a phrase hes going through and you just have to wait for it to pass.

  48. QUESTION:
    Just how dangerous is sleep apnea in a toddler?
    I noticed about a month ago that my 2year old daughter was stopping breathing in her sleep. I took her straight to the doctors, who then referred me to a specialist at the hospital.
    I saw them yesterday and they said she is growing well and is developing how she should be, so he doubted there was much for us to worry about.
    She does have large tonsils, so they are going to admit her into hospital for one night to record her sleeping.
    I was just hoping that someone could tell me if I need to be worried.
    It would be great to hear from people who have experience on this subject
    Many thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there, just so you know sleep apnoea is really common in infants and newborns. You can get a apnoea monitor (not sure the name of any brands - you'll have to google it) which monitors when the baby is asleep and will sound an alarm when she ceases to breathe. Just so you can keep an eye on her to make sure she isn't having any problems breathing normally again. Hope this helps

  49. QUESTION:
    Interested in parents/caregivers experiences with toddlers having their tonsils and adenoids out.?
    My little girl is booked to have her tonsils and adenoids removed as she has Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    I know is an operation that most children recover from with no issues but I'm just wanting to know other peoples experiences as I don't know anyone with small children whom have had their tonsils and adenoids removed.

    Thank you all in advance
    None of you have helped me.

    "I am a tree' do you even know what adenoids are?

    • ANSWER:
      Remove them it will cure in time

  50. QUESTION:
    I had severe rsv as a infant what does that have to do with strong immunity later on?
    when i got rsv i was in a oxygen tent for two months plus treatments for the next 6 months and what is confusing is that infants who had rsv usually have numerous breathing issues in their life but from what i've noticed and been told over the years is that it was the opposite thing my immune system grew stronger and efficient over time i have never had a flu shot medical records prove that and yet being next to people who have severe flu symptoms i still never caught it not even a sign of it what i want to know is that is there a connection between infants with rsv and rare cases of "super Immunity" if i would say because i never get sick.
    notes i have had high iron since toddler years
    moderate sleep apnea
    exercise-induced asthma
    and
    asbergers syndrome are all of my known diagonoses thanks for any help you may provide

    • ANSWER:
      There is no such thing as "super immunity", I rarely get sick myself, and I did not have RSV, and asbergers syndrome is a neurological condition, it's not a complete gift without drawbacks (the difficulty and challenges with socialization).

      You most likely have certain genetics that make it more difficult for the more common viruses to take over your cell and use it's replicative organelles to redistribute itself.

sleep apnea toddler

Sleep Apnea Underdiagnosed

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body (sequelae). In sleep apnea, your breathing stops or gets very shallow while you are sleeping. Each pause in breathing typically lasts 10 to 20 seconds or more. These pauses can occur 20 to 30 times or more an hour. Symptoms may be present for years, even decades without identification, during which time the sufferer may become conditioned to the daytime sleepiness and fatigue associated with significant levels of sleep disturbance. In adults, the most typical individual with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is obese, with particular heaviness at the face and neck. The hallmark symptom of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in adults is excessive daytime sleepiness. Typically, an adult or adolescent with severe long-standing obstructive sleep apnea will fall asleep for very brief periods in the course of usual daytime activities if given any opportunity to sit or rest. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body.

Sleep apnea is a common disorder that can be very serious. There are two distinct forms of sleep apnea: Central and Obstructive. Sleep apnea can cause high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease, memory problems, weight gain, impotency, and headaches. Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common category of sleep-disordered breathing. The prevalence of OSA among the adult population in western Europe and North America. The hallmark symptom of the disorder is excessive daytime sleepiness. Additional symptoms of sleep apnea include restless sleep, loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps), falling asleep during the day, morning headaches, trouble concentrating, irritability, forgetfulness, mood or behavior changes, anxiety, and depression. Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA). A more invasive surgery usually only tried in difficult cases where other surgeries have not relieved the patient's OSA. Apneas are usually measured during sleep (preferably in all stages of sleep) over a two-hour period.

Weight reduction and avoiding alcohol and sedatives may help some individuals. Surgery to remove excess tissue at the back of the throat , to remove enlarged tonsils or adenoids ,or to create an opening in the trachea to bypass the obstructed airway during sleep. Sleep Apnea in children where removing the tonsils or adenoids does not take care of the problem is usually treated with a C-PAP (continous positive airway pressure) or Bi-Level positive airway pressure. C-PAP is a machine that blows air into your nose via a nose mask, keeping the airway open and unobstructed. Bi-Level has an inspiratory pressure that is higher than the expiratory pressure. Some children have facial deformities that may cause the sleep apnea. Maxillomandibular advancement. In this procedure, the upper and lower part of your jaw is moved forward from the remainder of your face bones. Tracheostomy is used in persons with severe, life- threatening sleep apnea. Laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) is done to eliminate snoring but has not been shown to be effective in treating sleep apnea.

Sleep Apnea Treatment Tips

1. Behavioral Therapy-Is usually all that is needed for a mild case. It changes the person behavior towards the use of alcohol, tobacco which affects the airway.

2. Physical or Mechanical Therapy- The therapy provides air pressure to keep the airway from narrowing.

3. Surgery is considered only when other alternative therapy failed or if the patient volunteered to.

4. Avoid or at least limit alcohol intake.

5. Avoid or limit the use of tranquilizers, sleeping pills.

6. Avoid sleeping on your back.

7. Oxygen and medications may have adjunctive roles in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in some patients.

8. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, which removes excess tissue in the throat to make the airway wider.

9. Tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, which removes the tonsils and/or the adenoids.

10. Tracheostomy, which creates a hole in the windpipe (trachea). A tube is then put in the hole to bring air in.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How common is sleep apnea?
    I have been diagnosed with sleep apnea. My doctor says I'm not getting up to urinate, I'm awake because of sleep apnea. Is this a common problem?

    • ANSWER:
      yes-when you sleep your body shuts off the bladder, so you should not get up to go the bathroom.

      Sleep apnea is very common often underdiagnosed. (some statistics say 1 in 4 men have it) The sleep study will clearly have shown how many times you stopped breathing every hour. That may have been written as either an AHI or RDI.

      From webmd:
      The most common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that you may notice include:

      Excessive daytime sleepiness, which is falling asleep when you normally should not, such as while you are eating, talking, or driving.
      Waking with an unrefreshed feeling after sleep, having problems with memory and concentration, feeling tired, and experiencing personality changes.
      Morning or night headaches. About half of all people with sleep apnea report headaches.2
      Heartburn or a sour taste in the mouth at night.
      Swelling of the legs if you are obese.
      Getting up during the night to urinate (nocturia).
      Sweating and chest pain while you are sleeping.
      Symptoms of sleep apnea that others may notice include:

      Episodes of not breathing (apnea), which may occur as few as 5 times an hour (mild apnea) to more than 50 times an hour (severe apnea). How many episodes you have determines how severe your sleep apnea is.
      Loud snoring. Almost all people who have sleep apnea snore, but not all people who snore have sleep apnea.
      Restless tossing and turning during sleep.
      Nighttime choking or gasping spells.

      When you stop breathing, the oxygen levels in your blood go down and carbon dioxide levels go up. This makes your heart and blood vessels work harder and can affect your heart rate and nervous system. This in turn may lead to other problems including high blood pressure (hypertension) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Sleep apnea can also make these diseases worse and more difficult to treat. Sleep apnea also raises your risk of having a stroke.3

      Because sleep apnea disturbs your sleep, it can make you very tired during the day. If you have sleep apnea, you may:

      Be more likely to have a car accident.
      Perform poorly at school or work and have difficulty concentrating. You also may have memory problems.
      Have personality changes, anxiety, and depression.
      Lose the desire for sex.

      CPap is generally the treatment. Best wishes.

  2. QUESTION:
    Why are my fingers numb when I wake up in the morning?
    This has been happening for a couple of months. Sometimes they also go numb during the day, often when driving. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      The reason behind the numbness could be that you sleep on this arm and the nerve gets compressed and you feel the numbness or you sleep over it and the artery carrying the blood to the hand gets compressed as well.

      Not getting enough oxygen during sleep caused by not breathing enough is a condition that is underdiagnosed in lots of patients and is called obstructive sleep apnea and occurs mostly in the overweight/obese population. If you snore, someone has witnessed you not breathing for a while during sleep, if you feel tired and sleepy during the day, then i would recommend that you talk to your doctor about being evaluated for sleep apnea.

      This could also be carpal tunnel syndrome which is a condition characterised by pain and numbing or tingling sensations in the hand and caused by compression of a nerve in the carpal tunnel at the wrist.

  3. QUESTION:
    Woke up gasping for air?
    Alright so a couple times during the night, i might be dozing off and i just gasp for air. I get this very very awkward feeling everywhere. When i'm like half just falling asleep, and i wake up gasping for air, it feels as though i haven't breathed for a minute..and i was exhaling for a very long time..One time i woke up gasping for air and everything seemed in slow motion. It'll happen if i'm dead asleep too. I
    I do have asthma and my AC is usually always on. I have allergies..idk.
    I did go to a doctor and asked if they can check me out for Sleep Apnea but they just took notes and nothing further. Do you think it could be that or just because of my asthma/allergies?

    • ANSWER:
      That definitely sounds like sleep apnea, and you need to be tested. If your physician won't refer you for a sleep study, you can find a sleep physician yourself by asking around to friends or looking in the yellow pages. There's no excuse for a general practitioner ignoring this, but unfortunately, if two years in the field of sleep medicine has taught me anything, it's that sleep disorders are severely underdiagnosed. With apnea, your airflow decreases or stops completely as you fall asleep and your throat muscles relax. Your oxygen levels drop, and this causes your body to wake itself up (often with a gasp or a snort) in order to start breathing again. The decreased oxygen levels associated with sleep apnea are incredibly rough on your heart, and getting sleep apnea treated can most definitely be an issue of mortality. As for "do you think it could be that or just because of my asthma/allergies," it's not an issue of one or the other; the asthma/allergies could very likely worsen (or sometimes even cause) apnea, but it's important to get it treated regardless.

  4. QUESTION:
    OSA and Angina - Will CPAP help?
    I have OSA and have not been wearing my CPAP for 5 years because I moved out of the USA and one day it broke with a common power surge....no one here could fix it or replace it here in the Philippines... BUT NOW, I have been diagnosed with unstable Angina. When I read about how my CPAP can help, I always see this text..

    "This research shows that the most common treatment for OSA, which is using a CPAP, can reduce the buildup in the arteries. By reducing the plaque buildup, the potential for a heart attack or stroke is also reduced."

    Does this mean reduce the existing plaque in my arteries (therefore reducing Angina symptoms) or does this mean reduce the BUILD UP RATE in the arteries..(which does NOT reduce the actual existing plaque, in fact)

    • ANSWER:
      Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a machine that helps a person who has obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) breathe more easily during sleep.
      Obesity is strongly linked to an increased risk of OSA, and weight loss can reduce the severity of OSA. The current standard treatment for OSA nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) eliminates apnea and the ensuing acute hemodynamic changes during sleep. Long-term CPAP treatment studies have shown a reduction in nocturnal cardiac ischemic episodes and improvements in daytime blood pressure levels and left ventricular function. Despite the availability of effective therapy, OSA remains an underdiagnosed and undertreated condition.
      A lack of physician awareness is one of the primary reasons for this deficit in diagnosis and treatment.
      Bottom line is that it will not reduce angina nor will it reduce the size /formation/event of plaque. You have to take medication for it e.g nitrates/antiplatelets, reduce weight and physical (walking). So consult your doctor , not the bin research papers on internet.
      Get proper treatment please.
      G/Luck

sleep apnea underdiagnosed

Sleep Apnea Undiagnosed

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body (sequelae). In sleep apnea, your breathing stops or gets very shallow while you are sleeping. Each pause in breathing typically lasts 10 to 20 seconds or more. These pauses can occur 20 to 30 times or more an hour. Symptoms may be present for years, even decades without identification, during which time the sufferer may become conditioned to the daytime sleepiness and fatigue associated with significant levels of sleep disturbance. In adults, the most typical individual with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is obese, with particular heaviness at the face and neck. The hallmark symptom of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in adults is excessive daytime sleepiness. Typically, an adult or adolescent with severe long-standing obstructive sleep apnea will fall asleep for very brief periods in the course of usual daytime activities if given any opportunity to sit or rest. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body.

Sleep apnea is a common disorder that can be very serious. There are two distinct forms of sleep apnea: Central and Obstructive. Sleep apnea can cause high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease, memory problems, weight gain, impotency, and headaches. Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common category of sleep-disordered breathing. The prevalence of OSA among the adult population in western Europe and North America. The hallmark symptom of the disorder is excessive daytime sleepiness. Additional symptoms of sleep apnea include restless sleep, loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps), falling asleep during the day, morning headaches, trouble concentrating, irritability, forgetfulness, mood or behavior changes, anxiety, and depression. Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA). A more invasive surgery usually only tried in difficult cases where other surgeries have not relieved the patient's OSA. Apneas are usually measured during sleep (preferably in all stages of sleep) over a two-hour period.

Weight reduction and avoiding alcohol and sedatives may help some individuals. Surgery to remove excess tissue at the back of the throat , to remove enlarged tonsils or adenoids ,or to create an opening in the trachea to bypass the obstructed airway during sleep. Sleep Apnea in children where removing the tonsils or adenoids does not take care of the problem is usually treated with a C-PAP (continous positive airway pressure) or Bi-Level positive airway pressure. C-PAP is a machine that blows air into your nose via a nose mask, keeping the airway open and unobstructed. Bi-Level has an inspiratory pressure that is higher than the expiratory pressure. Some children have facial deformities that may cause the sleep apnea. Maxillomandibular advancement. In this procedure, the upper and lower part of your jaw is moved forward from the remainder of your face bones. Tracheostomy is used in persons with severe, life- threatening sleep apnea. Laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) is done to eliminate snoring but has not been shown to be effective in treating sleep apnea.

Sleep Apnea Treatment Tips

1. Behavioral Therapy-Is usually all that is needed for a mild case. It changes the person behavior towards the use of alcohol, tobacco which affects the airway.

2. Physical or Mechanical Therapy- The therapy provides air pressure to keep the airway from narrowing.

3. Surgery is considered only when other alternative therapy failed or if the patient volunteered to.

4. Avoid or at least limit alcohol intake.

5. Avoid or limit the use of tranquilizers, sleeping pills.

6. Avoid sleeping on your back.

7. Oxygen and medications may have adjunctive roles in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in some patients.

8. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, which removes excess tissue in the throat to make the airway wider.

9. Tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, which removes the tonsils and/or the adenoids.

10. Tracheostomy, which creates a hole in the windpipe (trachea). A tube is then put in the hole to bring air in.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    what is the mortality rate for patients with severe sleep apnea?
    ___ out of ____ people die from severe sleep apnea. (or any other statistics about mortality rate)

    what is the life expectancy with proper treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      There is a lot of undiagnosed sleep apnea out there so your first question is difficult to answer. People who fall asleep at the wheel because of sleep apnea and die in a crash would be in a different statistics. People who die of heart disease because of damage from high bp caused by sleep apnea fall in a different category.

      You second question is also difficult to answer. It depends on when the person was diagnosed and what is their co morbidity's. Does treatment save lives, I would say definitely. It saved mine. I was diagnosed in my 30s and am 100 percent compliant.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is sleep apnea and how is it diagnosed in children?
    My daughter wakes up every morning at 4am she is 1 and a half someone has suggested to me that it could be sleep apnea. What are the symptoms of this and what is it? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep apnea is any period of time where ther is no breathing while asleep. Usuly the time period is a minimum 10 seconds.

      The most common kind of sleep apnea is called Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome. It is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction that occur during sleep, usually associated with a reduction in blood oxygen saturation.

      symptoms:
      excessive daytime sleepiness
      frequent episodes of obstructed breathing during sleep. (The patient may be unaware of this symptom -- usually the parents are extremely aware of this).

      Associated features may include:
      snoring - loud, squeaky, raspy
      nocturnal snorting, gasping, choking (may wake self up)
      restless sleep
      heavy irregular breathing
      excessive perspiring during sleep
      severe bedwetting
      bad dreams (nightmares)
      night terrors
      sleeps with mouth open, causing a dry mouth upon awakening
      chest retraction during sleep in young children (chest pulls in)
      sleeps in strange positions
      confusion upon awakening
      morning headaches
      unrefreshing sleep
      excessive daytime sleepiness
      may develop high blood pressure
      may be overweight or underweight
      learning problems
      excessive irritability
      change in personality
      depression
      difficulty concentrating
      Developmental problems
      failure to thrive or grow
      frequent upper respiratory infections
      hyperactive behavior

      How serious is sleep apnea?
      It is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. The risks of undiagnosed obstructive in children with sleep apnea include learning problems, developmental problems, behavior problems and in some cases, failure to grow, heart problems and high blood pressure. In addition, obstructive sleep apnea causes daytime sleepiness that can result in personality changes, lost productivity in school and interpersonal relationship problems. A child with sleep apnea may lag behind in many areas of development. The child may become frustrated and depressed. The severity of the symptoms may be mild, moderate or severe.

      How does the doctor determine if my child has Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

      A sleep test, called polysomnography is usually done to diagnose sleep apnea. There are two kinds of polysomnograms. An overnight polysomnography test involves monitoring brain waves, muscle tension, eye movement, respiration, oxygen level in the blood and audio monitoring. (for snoring, gasping, etc.) The second kind of polysomnography test is a home monitoring test. A Sleep Technologist hooks your child up to all the electrodes and instructs you on how to record your child's sleep with a computerized polysomnograph that you take home and return in the morning. They are painless tests that are usually covered by insurance.

      How is Sleep Apnea treated?

      In children, simply removing the tonsils or adenoids may take care of the problem.

      Sleep Apnea in children where removing the tonsils or adenoids does not take care of the problem is usually treated with a C-PAP (continous positive airway pressure) or Bi-Level positive airway pressure. C-PAP is a machine that blows air into your nose via a nose mask, keeping the airway open and unobstructed. Bi-Level has an inspiratory pressure that is higher than the expiratory pressure. The sleep doctor will "prescribe" the pressure and a home healthcare company will set it up and provide training in its use and maintenance.

      When your child needs a machine, it can be quite intimidating. A C-PAP machine requires some care and a period of adjustment, but the benefits of C-PAP therapy are worth the inconvenience. C-PAP is NOT a venilator, it merely keeps the airway open so your child can breathe easily. It is not a complicated machine like some mentioned in the above link to kidshealth organization, nor do you have to worry about 24-hour nursing care or your child being in intensive care unless there are more complicated problems. A one night stay in a sleep clinic to monitor the child's breathing is generally all that is required. Here are some tips if your child comes home on a machine. A C-PAP machine may be "prescribed" for your child. A home healthcare company that contracts with your insurance will provide the machine and show you how it works and how to clean and maintain it.

      Find out about the different manufacturers who provide respiratory equipment for obstructive sleep apnea.

      Some children have facial deformities that may cause the sleep apnea. It simply may be that their jaw is smaller than it should be or they could have a smaller opening at the back of the throat. Some children have enlarged tonsils, a large tongue or some other tissues partially blocking the airway. Fixing a deviated septum may help to open the nasal passages. Removing the tonsils and adenoids or polyps may help also. Children are much more likely to have their tonsils and adenoids removed to solve the problem.

      The only available treatment for severe apnea until the early 1980's was a tracheostomy. A tracheostomy is a surgical procedure where a small hole is cut in the neck and a tube with a valve is inserted into the hole. During the day the valve is closed so the person can speak. At night, the valve is opened, thus avoiding the obstructions. This procedure is only used today as a last resort or to avoid respiratory distress, or other serious medical complications (Your child would have to be extremely sick to require this).

  3. QUESTION:
    Are there any CPAP systems for sleep apnea that operate off of compressed air tank?
    Are there any CPAP systems for sleep apnea that operate off of compressed air tank as apposed to a small electric compressor?

    My father would like to go camping but there won't be any electricity to operate his CPAP system. One that operated off of a SCUBA tank might work though.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Not necessarily.
      You get a small dry-cell battery (about the size of a loaf of bread), and a converted that clips onto the battery and has a plug in for your CPAP. The dry cell battery will run for a couple days before you need to plug it in somewhere and recharge it.

      That's what I do. If I'm going camping for longer than that, I've always found a gas station that would plug it in for me for the day to recharge the battery. This system has the added benefit ... if the electricity goes out because of power failure, I don't have to stay awake until it comes back on (I have permanent heart damage from years of undiagnosed and untreated severed sleep apnea, so I will NOT sleep or even nap without my CPAP).

      I know a lady with moderate sleep apnea. She went to Korea for a year, to teach English there. She didn't want to mess with her CPAP while she was overseas, so she had a mouthpiece (oral appliance) made up ... she said it seemed to work for her. Generally, however, the mouthpieces are considered to not be as effective as a CPAP.

  4. QUESTION:
    What should someone do about undiagnosed sleep apnea?
    I think I may have it in some form. My sleep is badly fragmented.

    But it takes time to get a sleep study done and a CPAP. So what do I do till then, because the symptoms are making me feel weak and exhausted.

    And there are other health issues I may be having as well.
    Im actually almost underweight

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    Why does my nephew snore so much when sleeping?
    I'm worried. I think he might be sleep-deprived. He's 8 years old. He's not obese or anything so I don't know why he is snoring. Might he have sleep apnea? Sometimes he shifts around in his sleep every 15 minutes.

    • ANSWER:
      Needs to seed an ENT. Snoring is a symptom of sleep apnea. This can affect learning, and health

      from www.stanford.edu

      What is Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

      The most common kind of sleep apnea is called Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome. It is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction that occur during sleep, usually associated with a reduction in blood oxygen saturation.

      What are the symptoms?

      excessive daytime sleepiness
      frequent episodes of obstructed breathing during sleep. (The patient may be unaware of this symptom -- usually the parents are extremely aware of this).
      Associated features may include:
      snoring - loud, squeaky, raspy
      nocturnal snorting, gasping, choking (may wake self up)
      restless sleep
      heavy irregular breathing
      excessive perspiring during sleep
      severe bedwetting
      bad dreams (nightmares)
      night terrors
      sleeps with mouth open, causing a dry mouth upon awakening
      chest retraction during sleep in young children (chest pulls in)
      sleeps in strange positions
      confusion upon awakening
      morning headaches
      unrefreshing sleep
      excessive daytime sleepiness
      may develop high blood pressure
      may be overweight or underweight
      learning problems
      excessive irritability
      change in personality
      depression
      difficulty concentrating
      Developmental problems
      failure to thrive or grow
      frequent upper respiratory infections
      hyperactive behavior
      How serious is sleep apnea?
      It is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. The risks of undiagnosed obstructive in children with sleep apnea include learning problems, developmental problems, behavior problems and in some cases, failure to grow, heart problems and high blood pressure. In addition, obstructive sleep apnea causes daytime sleepiness that can result in personality changes, lost productivity in school and interpersonal relationship problems. A child with sleep apnea may lag behind in many areas of development. The child may become frustrated and depressed. The severity of the symptoms may be mild, moderate or severe.

      http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/sleep/a/sleep_apnea.htm

      http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/sleep/l/blquiz_osa_scng.htm

      http://www.aafp.org/afp/20040301/1159ph.html

      http://www.stanford.edu/~dement/childapnea.html

  6. QUESTION:
    Does sleep apnea kill you or is it the affects that do?
    Is it sleep apnea that can kill you or is it the affects such as ( heart failure, Heart attack, etc. )

    and if so how long could it go untreated?

    • ANSWER:
      I will have to say yes, that OSA can kill you outright. I can only say this from surmising that it will happen out of odds.

      For the most part though, OSA will cause many other diseases first. These include high blood pressure, right side heart failure, strokes and now has been linked to some cancers. These diseases can take years to cause enough damage to cause death.

      Reggie White (Green Bay) died in his sleep. I believe he had undiagnosed OSA

  7. QUESTION:
    Anyone know how to help with sleep apnea?
    Ok I've got asthma and sometimes I wake up at 2-3AM and I can't breathe and move at all. At first I thought this was my asthma but it was actually sleep apnea. Please help I'm only 15 and I feel like nearly every night I have a chance of "kicking the bucket". What can i do to stop it?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello.

      First the most traditional method of treating Sleep Apnea is with a CPAP (Continuous Positive Air Pressure) machine. Its a mask that goes on your face at night and helps keep your throat open so you can get some real airflow back there instead of having it be interrupted like it is now.

      To get one is no easy task since you'll need the right pressure in order to utilize it correctly.

      You'll want to go to your primary doctor and tell him your situation. If he feels it is appropriate than he will get you a sleep study and refer you to a doctor who specializes in respiratory care. Without insurance these can be from 0 - 0 dollars (insurance covered my 900 dollar bill!)

      The sleep study will have you sleeping over at the hospital for one night. They will hook up electrodes and what nots to you and study your brain , eye and leg activity (and a few more, pulse etc). It doesn't hurt but its super uncomfortable since I sleep on my side and there were about 50 or so wires!

      Afterwards the sleep doc will take a look at your charts and take the appropriate action. If you are overweight, he will probably assign you a CPAP machine but stress that you need to lose weight.

      If you are uncomfortable with the CPAP machine you can get a dental device which will help keep the airways open, but this is a much more costly option. I didn't really ask how much, since the CPAP alone is around another 1000 dollars (!).

      Anyway it sounds like you probably just need to lose weight. If you think that you are actually pretty healthy it is still possible for you to suffer sleep apnea because your throat may just naturally relax. In either case if you have the means START THIS PROCESS NOW as sleep apnea is a very common but undiagnosed issue. People think its cute to snore, but it's actually very dangerous!

  8. QUESTION:
    Does sleep apnea kill you or is it the affects?
    Does sleep apnea kill you or is it the affects such as (heart attack, Heart failure, etc.)

    and if so how long can it go untreated before getting bad???

    • ANSWER:
      I will have to say yes, that OSA can kill you outright. I can only say this from surmising that it will happen out of odds.

      For the most part though, OSA will cause many other diseases first. These include high blood pressure, right side heart failure, strokes and now has been linked to some cancers. These diseases can take years to cause enough damage to cause death.

      Reggie White (Green Bay) died in his sleep. I believe he had undiagnosed OSA

  9. QUESTION:
    Cpap machine usage can i still get sleep apnea?
    I have been using a Cpap machine for Server sleep apnea, and it changed my life i didnt nap once during the day where as before i constantly napped. however i am finding my self feeling a little tired these days, why would this be?, i get a great nights sleep so i believe so it isnt making much sense.
    anyone experience this at all and have any clues?

    • ANSWER:
      Deep deprivation affects many areas of your body and can result in fatigue, memory problems, and can lead to illnesses such as heart disease and stroke. If your sleep is interrupted by frequent periods in which you do not breathe for up to a minute at a time, you may be suffering from sleep apnea, one of the most undiagnosed and untreated sleep disorders. Sleep apnea is a very treatable disorder. The treatment involves the use of CPAP machines. These machines are used in conjunction with a sleep apnea mask that allows air to be gently pushed into the airways so that a person can sleep without interruption. Since loss of sleep can affect how well the immune system fights illnesses and diseases, a full night of uninterrupted sleep is necessary to maintain good health. We have all the CPAP supplies you need to successfully treat sleep apnea and feel better.

  10. QUESTION:
    Bf snores like a lumberjack. Can this be caused by his weight and constant pot smoking?
    My current boyfriend smokes pot at least 15 per week. He snores soooo LOUD at night and we have now resorted to sleeping in different rooms of our apartment. He is overweight and doesn't eat very healhy. I really want him to either eat better and exercise or go to the doctor and see if he possibly has sleep apnea. Can his excessive pot smoking be linked to the snoring?!?! This is starting to hinder our relationship and my sleep at night! Any help appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      It could be related. Snoring can be caused by being overweight (this is the number one factor), undiagnosed allergies (this is the number 2 factor) or sleeping on our back. He should try losing just a little weight. It really helps. In the meantime, he should use a warm mist-humidifier at night. He should also use the tennis ball trick. You put a tennis ball in a sock and pin it to the back of the shirt he sleeps in. Then, if he rolls over on to his back at night, the ball will nudge him back on to his side. Whatever you can do to help him stop snoring, it's worth it. Snoring has been linked to a 67% increased risk of stroke.

  11. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had these 3 surgeries done at the same time?
    I am getting my soft palate reduction, adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy at the same time.

    I have a couple of questions, i would rather have the general public address than the doctor. Because all the doctor can give me is statistics and 'rare' occassions.

    Is bleeding of the throat prevalent after the surgery?
    I heard i would not get my original voice back after the surgery, how true is this?
    Would i lose weight, after the surgery?
    How long would i have to go without solid food?
    Should spicy food be avoided at all costs, after the surgery?
    Would i be more prone to infections and allergies after the surgery?

    I'm having this surgery because i have OSA - Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    • ANSWER:
      There are three types of apnea: obstructive, central, and mixed; of the
      three, obstructive is the most common. Despite the difference in the
      root cause of each type, in all three, people with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times during the night and often for a minute or longer.

      Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by a blockage of the airway, usually when the soft tissue in the rear of the throat collapses and closes during sleep.

      In central sleep apnea, the airway is not blocked but the brain fails to signal the muscles to breathe.

      Mixed apnea, as the name implies, is a combination of the two. With each
      apnea event, the brain briefly arouses people with sleep apnea in order for them to resume breathing, but consequently sleep is extremely fragmented and of poor quality.

      Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. This is the most common form of breathing-related sleep disorder, marked by episodes of blockage in the upper airway during sleep. It is found primarily in obese people. Patients with this disorder typically alternate between periods of snoring or gasping (when their airway is partly open) and periods of silence (when their airway is blocked). Very loud snoring is a clue to this disorder.

      Guess, the surgeon has decided to do a reduction of your elongated soft palate; which is one of the many causes of OSA.

      Other risk factors or more realistic predisposing factors of OSA:

      1) excessive weight gain or central obesity
      2) Age- loss of muscle mass and thus replaced with fat
      3) gender: male hormones
      4) anatomical abnormalities such as a receding chin
      5) enlarged tonsils and adenoids - common cause among children
      6) family hx
      7) use of alcohol or sedatives
      8) smoking
      9) Diseases/conditions - Hypothyroidism, Obesity, Down's syndrome, vocal cord paralysis; post-polio syndrome, amyloidosis, Marfan's syndrome, neuromuscular disorders

      Someone who has undiagnosed severe
      obstructive sleep apnea is likely to have a heart attack, a stroke, cardiac arrest during sleep, or a harmful accident.

      If you have one or more of the other predisposing factors as mentioned above, esp obesity- having this surgery is not a cure-all guarantee - that your problem will be solved.

      Normally, T&A ( Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy) is done during childhood for chronic tonsillitis. Thruout my childhood, I suffered from frequent upper respiratory infections such as common colds, and the flu; chronic tonsillitis, pharyngitis(sore throat) and laryngitis ( hoarse voice) so much so that I missed a lot of school days. I was constantly placed on antibiotics.

      I didn't have the surgery done until I was 26. Now, my quality of life is so much improved. I'm less prone to upper resp infections; such as tonsillitis with difficulty of swallowing. One of the many benefits of this T&A now is to enjoy drinking ice cold drinks and eating a cone of ice cream; without the side effects. .

      Mind you, because of my age and that being my very first surgery, the recovery phase wasn't a picnic and as pleasant as a child might go thru. I suffered a great deal of pain requiring quite a bit of painkillers. The surgeon stated that my tonsils were so enlarged that I must have suffered quite a bit growing up.

      I had the post-op blues which is one of the side effects of surgery.and anesthesia. However, there was no bleeding, or infection. Nowadays, it's a normal precautionary procedure for surgeons, to give an IV administration of a dose of antibiotic 24-hr pre-operatively.to prevent infection. You don't lose weight as you resume eating normally after a few days. Besides, you don't use this surgery to lose weight.

      Of course, spicy foods are off limits initially; as they are irritating and might induce bleeding. Hot drinks are discouraged as would cause vasodilation and thus bleeding. Ice chips were tolerated and soothing. As a matter-of fact, kids are allowed ice cream 2 hrs post-operatively if there is no vomiting from the anesthesia. After the recovery phase, there is no limit as to any type of foods including spicy foods; which I enjoy.

      There is no effect on your voice as your vocal chords are not involved. Immediately, after surgery, your voice might be a little raspy due to the soreness of your throat and your fear of straining. However, your voice would resume to being normal once the swelling and inflammation is gone. There might be a slight change with the soft palate reduction if any.

      You should not be alarmed. It is a normal and required routine of all pre-op pts to sign this operative consent -. with the stated normal risks of bleeding and infection as with ALL surgeries.

      So, I hope all of the above- answers all your questions adequately.

      Oh, by the way, I still have my allergies and allergic rhinits but not as bad. But I'm not prone to acute tonsillitis anymore and more importantly, when I get a sore throat with the colds, I can swallow without difficulty. And the episodes of upper respiratory infections are less.

  12. QUESTION:
    How to sleep well and be able to wake up on time?
    I can never fall asleep. The only way I can get into bed and fall asleep within an hour is if I am taking sleep aids, which I can't take every night. Every night I just lay there and think. I have tried tea, milk, relaxing, running before I go to bed, everything. And when I can't sleep I dont get enough sleep and can't wake up on time for school. How can I fall asleep in a reasonable amount of time and be able to wake up on time.

    • ANSWER:
      Avoid caffeine and other stimulants after mid day. Try to isolate yourself from background light while sleeping. Even light from a T.V. or an alarm clock can keep you from getting to sleep and staying that way. Sometimes background white noise helps lull you to sleep, such as a fan or CD playing "spa music" on low volume.

      It's a very real possibility that you have un-diagnosed sleep apnea. Classified as a disorder, sleep apnea affects over 70 million Americans today, while 2-4% of Americans are estimated to have undiagnosed sleep apnea.

      The only way to know for sure, whether or not you have sleep apnea, is to be examined, screened, and possibly tested for it. Seek out the opinion of your physician. Another option is to talk to a dentist trained in the treatment of sleep apnea. Many of them offer take home sleep tests.

      - Dr. Anthony J. Kohler DDS

  13. QUESTION:
    How can I get myself to sleep on my back?
    My chiroprator says that I NEED to sleep on my back and not my side to help reduce my shoulder pain. I always seem to have the tendency to want to sleep on my side though, anyway to prevent myself from doing that?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a few things you can do. First of all, if you can, raise the head of the bed -- breathing is often more difficult on your back (even in people who don't have significant sleep apnea), and sleeping on an incline can help with that. It's also hard to roll to a side when the bed is inclined. If an adjustable bed isn't in your budget, you can buy foam wedges that will do the trick. (Actually, for many people who have difficulty sleeping on their backs, it can be because of undiagnosed apnea -- the tendency to roll to your side is your body's way of trying to keep you breathing -- so you may want to get checked out by a sleep physician.) Secondly, try sleeping with pillows on either side of you. Some people have trouble sleeping on their backs because they need to do something with their arms. Just having pillows under them can keep you sort of "cocooned" and more comfortable. Thirdly, you can safety pin a sock full of tennis balls to the side of a shirt you sleep in, so that if you unknowingly roll to your side during the night, you won't be able to stay there. (We usually use this technique, with the sock pinned to the back instead of the side, for people who have supine-dependent sleep apnea, and who we're trying to keep OFF their backs.) I hope that helps!

  14. QUESTION:
    How likely would it be for a 18 year old to have undiagnosed sleep apnea or sleep seizures?
    and have never had any symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Steve, is this person you? A "typical" sleep apnea patient can usually tell if they are or not. You might be able to hide it from the rest of the world, but those closest to us can't be so easily fooled. I also have sleep apnea and was 2 days away from enough carbon dioxide in me choking off the oxygen in me that it turned out that the c-pap machine I hated so much was the one thing that saved me. Ironic or what? Thank God I was in the hospital that night too. I then must believe that when it's your time to go nothing will save you either. Too many ifs. Since your question really baffles me I leave it to you to reread and ask yourself How does someone without any symptoms even have a diagnosed condition of any disorder. An 18yr.old that has no symptoms even be given any diagnosis by any type Doctor? Not possible. Good luck and God Bless

  15. QUESTION:
    What illnesses/medical problems can cause a person to just drop dead one day?
    I had a perfectly healthy friend, who one day just didn't wake up after a nights sleep. He was 18. Do you have any idea what this could be? If you could list a few possibilities of this I'd be grateful.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      UN - There are many possible causes of seemingly sudden death in what appeared to be a healthy young person. These include:
      Heart attack from congenital (inborn) heart defects
      Ruptured brain Aneurysm with brain hemorrhage
      Poisoning
      Homicide
      Suicide
      Adverse reaction, especially alcohol overdose with vomiting
      Allergic reaction
      Diabetic low blood sugar
      Medication overdose (type of Medical misadventure)
      Drug overdose
      Appendicitis
      Diabetic ketoacidosis - typically from undiagnosed diabetes
      Type 1 diabetes - mainly death from DKA if undiagnosed.
      Dilated cardiomyopathy - sudden death
      Opium addiction - sudden death
      Narcotic addiction - sudden death
      Aorto-ventricular tunnel - sudden death
      Ventricular tachycardia - sudden death
      Timothy syndrome - sudden death
      Idiopathic dilation cardiomyopathy - sudden death
      Hyperbilirubinemia transient, familial, neonatal - sudden death
      Ecstasy addiction - sudden death
      Atrial fibrillation, familial 1 - sudden death
      Amyloid cardiopathy - sudden death
      Ventricular tachycardia, catecholaminergic polymorphic, 2 - sudden death
      Prinzmetal's variant angina - sudden death
      Idiopathic, hypertrophic, subaortic stenosis - sudden death
      Cocaine addiction - sudden death
      Giant cell myocarditis - sudden death
      Hypertension due to coarctation of the aorta - sudden death
      3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 1 - sudden death
      Paroxysmal ventricular fibrillation - sudden death
      Cardiomyopathy dilated with conduction defect - sudden death
      Cardiomyopathy dilated 1P - sudden death
      Cysticercosis - sudden death
      Prescribed medication addiction - sudden death
      Pain killer addiction - sudden death
      Heroin dependence - sudden death
      Coronary arteries -- congenital malformation - sudden death
      Cardiomyopathy dilated 1Q - sudden death
      Sleeping pill addiction - sudden death
      Sleep apnea - sudden death
      Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase deficiency - sudden death
      Tranquilizer addiction - sudden death
      Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome - sudden death
      Oxycontin addiction - sudden death
      I realize I left out many other possibilities.

  16. QUESTION:
    What is a good way to naturally wake your self up?
    I've tried energy drinks and coffee and stuff like that but I think that puts me to bed. I need help! I might fall asleep on the job.
    Thanks for the advise but I was looking more for right now. I am at work and I am falling asleep. Plus anything with caffine does NOT wake me up. In fact it puts me to bed. Thanks though

    • ANSWER:
      You need a good night's sleep to naturally wake yourself up - so here are some sleep hygiene do's and don'ts:

      DO:
      go to bed at the same time every night
      turn your lights off one hour before bedtime
      eat a healthy dinner
      use a white noise generator if noise is a problem where you are
      use room-darkening shades
      only use your bed for sleep and intimate relations
      exercise daily
      have a bed time routine you follow every night
      keep your room between 60-65 degrees at night
      take a Benadryl if you're not sleepy (and if it doesn't interfere with any medications you are already taking) - it contains diphenhydramine, which is a non-addictive antihistamine that also helps with sleep - it's the main ingredient in Tylenol PM, Advil PM and many sleeping pills

      DON'T:
      allow pets into your bed
      spend time in bed watching TV or reading
      read or watch stimulating books, news, or TV shows before bed
      have caffeine after 2 PM
      lie in bed awake for hours, hoping to fall asleep
      exercise right before bed
      eat a heavy meal within a couple hours of bedtime
      drink large amounts of water in the evening
      sleep in a hot room

      If you already have great sleep hygiene and you get 7 - 9 hours of good sleep every night, then it might time to talk to a doctor. There are sleep disorders which could leave you sleepy during the day (sleep apnea is one of them) and there are other health problems that can lead to poor sleep, as well as undiagnosed depression or bipolar. Your doctor would be able to prescribe medications that will help you remain wakeful during the day if nothing is wrong with you and you end up needing one (and those medications are only used rarely, so you may not need one).

      One thing that has helped me over the years is following the do's and don'ts listed above, plus I've recently added caffeine to my morning routine. I have a cup of coffee or green tea each morning. On days when I'm sleepy after lunchtime, I'll have a can of Mt. Dew or other caffeine-laden beverage around 2 PM. I've been more wakeful (even though I have a sleep disorder) just by following that routine.

      You might also want to figure out if something at work is making you sleepy. If you sit at a desk all day, that would be a sure way to get drowsy, especially when the room is too warm (and, in wintertime, that's going to happen). Try using a fan. Also, try sipping ice water throughout your day. The coolness is somewhat invigorating. You can also splash cold water on your face on days that get really bad. And it also helps to get up and move around every hour.

  17. QUESTION:
    Can you die from too much sleep?
    I was just wondering, could some one die from too much sleep? I sleep for about 14-16 hours a day sometimes, continuously, so i was wondering, does this affect me in any way? Are there any side effects/symptoms of too much sleep?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,
      You are right to be concerned; oversleeping has been linked to a host of medical problems, including diabetes, heart disease and increased risk of death. There are two other factors -- depression and low socioeconomic status -- that are strongly associated with oversleeping. Those two factors may be the reason for the observed negative health effects. For example, people of lower socioeconomic status may have less access to health care and therefore more undiagnosed illnesses, such as heart disease, which, in turn, may cause oversleeping.

      You also need to determine why you oversleep; it could be that you may have hypersomnia; unless you are doing it merely because you can, oversleeping can actually be a medical disorder. The condition causes people to suffer from extreme sleepiness throughout the day, which is not usually relieved by napping. It also causes them to sleep for unusually long periods of time at night. Many people with hypersomnia experience symptoms of anxiety, low energy (tiredness/fatigue), and memory problems as a result of their almost constant need for sleep.

      Obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder that causes people to stop breathing momentarily during sleep, can also lead to an increased need for sleep. That's because it disrupts the normal sleep cycle.

      This is not meant to scare you - but you should look into getting out of bed and finding something productive to do. If you can, volunteer at a local charity - you should gain a sense of doing something good for someone that is less fortunate than you. Best Wishes!

  18. QUESTION:
    Sleep-What will happen to my body if I get way too much sleep than I need?
    Just this morning I slept all day until the afternoon,I sometimes I get up and then go right back to sleep.it is 1:24 A.M now and I don't even feel tired.
    I plan to sleep for 24 straight hours later.

    • ANSWER:
      When it comes to sleep, can you have too much of a good thing? It's true a good night's sleep is essential for health. But oversleeping has been linked to a host of medical problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and increased risk of death.

      Researchers are careful to note, however, that two other factors -- depression and low socioeconomic status -- are strongly associated with oversleeping. Those two factors may be the reason for the observed negative health effects. For example, people of lower socioeconomic status may have less access to health care and therefore more undiagnosed illnesses, such as heart disease, which, in turn, may cause oversleeping.
      Oversleeping: How Much Sleep Is Too Much?

      The amount of sleep you need varies significantly over the course of your lifetime. It depends on your age and activity level as well as your general health and lifestyle habits. For instance, during periods of stress or illness, you may feel an increased need for sleep. But although sleep needs differ over time and from person to person, experts typically recommend that adults should sleep between seven and nine hours each night.
      Why Do People Sleep Too Much?

      For people who suffer from hypersomnia, oversleeping is actually a medical disorder. The condition causes people to suffer from extreme sleepiness throughout the day, which is not usually relieved by napping. It also causes them to sleep for unusually long periods of time at night. Many people with hypersomnia experience symptoms of anxiety, low energy, and memory problems as a result of their almost constant need for sleep.

      Obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder that causes people to stop breathing momentarily during sleep, can also lead to an increased need for sleep. That's because it disrupts the normal sleep cycle.

      Of course, not everyone who oversleeps has a sleep disorder. Other possible causes of oversleeping include the use of certain substances, such as alcohol and some prescription medications. Other medical conditions, including depression, can cause people to oversleep. And then there are people who simply enjoy sleeping for long periods of time.
      Medical Problems Linked to Oversleeping

      Diabetes. In a study of almost 9,000 Americans, researchers found a relationship between sleep and the risk of diabetes. People who slept more than nine hours each night had a 50% greater risk of diabetes than people who slept seven hours per night. This increased risk was also seen in people who slept less than five hours per night. The researchers did not draw conclusions about the physiological link between long sleep and diabetes. But they did suggest that oversleeping could be indicative of underlying medical problems that increase the likelihood of diabetes.

      Obesity. Sleeping too much could make you weigh too much, as well. One recent study showed that people who slept for nine or 10 hours every night were 21% more likely to become obese over a six-year period than were people who slept between seven and eight hours. This association between sleep and obesity remained the same even when food intake and exercise were taken into account.

      Medical Problems Linked to Oversleeping continued...

      Headaches. For some people prone to headaches, sleeping longer than usual on a weekend or vacation can cause head pain. Researchers believe this is due to the effect oversleeping has on certain neurotransmitters in the brain, including serotonin. People who sleep too much during the day and disrupt their nighttime sleep may also find themselves suffering from headaches in the morning.

      Back pain. There was a time when doctors told people suffering from back pain to head straight to bed. But those days are long gone. You do need to curtail your regular exercise program when you are experiencing back pain. But doctors now realize the health benefits of maintaining a certain level of activity. And they recommend against sleeping more than usual, when possible.

      Depression. Although insomnia is more commonly linked to depression than oversleeping, roughly 15% of people with depression sleep too much. This may in turn make their depression worse. That's because regular sleep habits are important to the recovery process. Need another reason not to overdo the ZZZs when you're blue? In certain instances, sleep deprivation can be an effective treatment for depression.

      Heart disease. The Nurses' Health Study involved nearly 72,000 women. A careful analysis of the data from that study showed that women who slept nine to 11 hours per night were 38% more likely to have coronary heart disease than women who slept eight hours. Researchers have not yet identified a reason for the connection between oversleeping and heart disease.

      Death. Multiple studies have found that people who sleep nine or more hours a night have significantly higher death rates than people sleeping seven to eight hours a night. No specific reason for this correlation has been d

  19. QUESTION:
    What can a person do to try and prevent heart disease?
    I mean beyond the basics of no smoking, exercise and healthy diet. Are there pills people can take on a daily basis to assist in preventing it? I'm only 28 but would like to do all I can to try and prevent it.

    • ANSWER:
      Statin therapy has been shown in individuals at potential risk to prevent heart disease, even in the presence of a "normal" lipid profile. Your doctor can order a high-sensitivity c-reactive protein lab which may identify you as having a higher risk than the average individual, and indication that early statin therapy may help.

      But no medications can compete with the cornerstone's you mentioned of exercise, tobacco cessation, and dietary choices. Daily baby aspirin will also help prevent heart attack. Oh, and just in case it needs mention, avoid cocaine and heroin.

      Finally, if you are a snorer, it may be beneficial to get evaluated for sleep apnea, as this can cause a non-blood clot form of heart attack directly from the sleep apnea. Untreated, it would raise your risk of heart attack and stroke significantly and a lot of people have apnea and go undiagnosed and untreated.

  20. QUESTION:
    Can you help me pinpoint the source of my sleep deprivation?
    Hi all! I have a question (self-explanatory). What I believe it is are two things: I work out excessively and intensely and I haven't been to the gym or track in almost 72 hours, so I was thinking it could be excess energy (diet and everything is the same). The other is withdrawal; I was prescribed percocet and followed a strict dosage schedule. No, I'm not a mental addict, but more likely physical considering I haven't taken one in 30 hours. So other than these two changes recently I can't think of anything else. All answers are greatly appreciated and thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      I am not trained as a medical professional and my opinions are my own and I lack any form of certification or qualification. If you need medical advice, please seek out a qualified professional such as a physician, naturopath, or psychic. Any questions pertaining to your prescription of percocet should be directed to your physician.

      Personally, I've found that consuming stimulants or depressants can cause sleep problems. I've also discovered that eating patterns can have an impact on your ability to sleep. I try to eat my last meal no later than 6PM and avoid eating in the evenings.

      Other factors to consider are:

      - Environmental noise and lights that can interfere with deep sleep.
      - Undiagnosed sleep apnea causing interrupted sleep.
      - Comfort of room temperature, humidity, air flow.
      - Comfort of bed including mattress and comforter.
      - Stress caused by thinking patterns. (See Marshall Rosenberg. See meditation.)
      - Unhealthy diet. (Learn about whole plant based diet. Dean Ornish or Neal Barnard)

      Of course there are many other factors that can impact your sleeping patterns. Consider spending some time with a caring Naturopath to discuss how your lifestyle, thinking patterns, and environment may be impacting you. Of course, talk to your physician about prescription medications and other factors that may impact your ability to sleep.

      Sleep deprivation is a very serious problem that needs to be addressed. Generally, depressants (sleeping pills) are only a short-term solution.

  21. QUESTION:
    If u sleep about 9, 10, or 11 hours at night. And then u are still sleepy during the day?
    What can be the problem here? Please explain.

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps you may be suffering from sleep apnea which is caused by a blockage of the airway which happens when the soft tissue of the throat collapses during sleep.

      When this occurs, the brain briefly arouses people with sleep apnea in order for them to resume breathing. This could happen many times during the night thus making your sleep extremely fragmented and of poor quality.

      Sleep apnea is very common, as common as adult diabetes. Risk factors include being male, overweight, and over the age of forty, but it can strike anyone at any age, even children. Yet still because of the lack of awareness by the public and healthcare professionals, the vast majority remain undiagnosed and therefore untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences.

      Please consult your doctor immediately.

  22. QUESTION:
    what age is a good age to move our baby from our room to her own room?
    my daughter is 10 weeks old and has slept in our room since she came home from the hospital... she sleeps in her own crib... Im a little worried about moving her to her own room because Im scared of SIDS and I read the having the baby in your room can help reduce the risk of it?? whats your opinion?

    • ANSWER:
      I was very scared about sids too. As long as the baby is sleeping in her own bed it's okay to leave her there for a few months. Between 3 and 6 months is usually the perfect time. After 9 months she will not want to leave... trust me. Don't worry too much about sids. Just make sure she is breathing okay and falls asleep on her back. Sudden Infant Death is usually caused by unsafe sleeping practices or other undiagnosed problems like sleep apnea.

  23. QUESTION:
    why do i keep doing weird things in my sleep without knowing?
    i've recently been doing weird things in my sleep, as if i was sleep walking.

    i have drank a bottle of perfume in my sleep once
    and have also thrown water in my face in my sleep and woke me up.

    i have looked at insomnia but i dont think its that, does anyone have an solutions to my problem?

    apart from sleep walking obviously, id appreciate real answers instead of stupid ones like 'weirdo' or 'its called schizophrenia'

    thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      You may be having sleep apnea. You need to tell me more symptoms but it can cause serious problems.

      Ok so here are the associations with sleep apnea:

      loud snoring
      morning headaches
      unrefreshing sleep
      a dry mouth upon awakening
      chest retraction during sleep in young children (chest pulls in)
      high blood pressure
      overweight
      irritability
      change in personality
      depression
      difficulty concentrating
      excessive perspiring during sleep
      heartburn
      reduced libido
      insomnia
      frequent nocturnal urination (nocturia)
      restless sleep
      nocturnal snorting, gasping, choking (may wake self up)
      rapid weight gain
      confusion upon awakening

      Do you have any of these symptoms also?

      Even though most of the above listed associations aren't too severe sleep apnea can be VERY serious. It is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. The risks of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea include heart attacks, strokes, impotence, irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure and heart disease. In addition, obstructive sleep apnea causes daytime sleepiness that can result in accidents, lost productivity and interpersonal relationship problems. The severity of the symptoms may be mild, moderate or severe.

      I hope I helped and come visit me at my website: http://www.freesleepinfo.com/

  24. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to develop dyslexia or for it to get worse with age?
    Throughout school I never had a problem reading, it was actually my best subject. But lately numbers and letters have been appearing flipped over or in the wrong order until I focus on it for a few minutes. I'm not sure that it's dyslexia, and I've looked online but it seems like to develop it you need to have a stroke or something traumatic, which is not my case. I'm about to turn 19, so maybe it was just a mild form of it and it got worse enough now that I can notice it? Or is there another disease or syndrome similar? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Flipped or seeing letters in the wrong order is more a symptom of visual dyslexia rather than dyslexia. Generally both conditions ( dyslexia and visual dyslexia ) exist from birth and don't just appear at a later time except for trauma which you haven't had. The only realistic possibility would be that you might have a mild visual dyslexia and that for some reason are now either in poorer health or under a lot of stress which tends to make visual dyslexia symptoms worse and only now noticeable.

      Visual dyslexia is very individualistic ( and is my niche , I developed See Right Dyslexia Glasses , a universal visual dyslexia filter ) and I have only seen one possibly similar case. It was a girl your age who had no visual problems until she went to college and found that she had problems similar to yours under the pressure of taking timed tests where her personality pushed her to hurry. If she relaxed and slowed down the symptoms would go away. She ended up using my glasses whenever she took tests to eliminate her visual problems.

      I would suggest you try to relax and slow down your reading to see if your symptoms can be eliminated that way and try to evaluate if your problems are situation specific. If your problems are stress related any of several stress reduction techniques may be all you need. It could also be an undiagnosed medical problem causing your stress. Sleep apnea comes to mind as a possibility of non traumatic stress that could also increase the visual dyslexia symptoms enough to be noticeable and in that case a good night's sleep might eliminate the symptoms.

  25. QUESTION:
    Are there any herbs that can keep acid reflux under control?
    This condition is really getting bad, I'm being woken up by this now several times per night.

    • ANSWER:
      MY brother cured his gerd with cabbage juice..it never came back

      see my post here on how

      http://curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1391353

      I was recently diagnosed with silent reflux (larengoesophegeal reflux) which does not have typical pain or heartburn symptoms and often goes undiagnosed for years that I estimate from my symptoms of extreme coughing, lots of phelm and more recently globbus sensation that prompted some testing) that I have had 15 years at least. I think now it is the cause or contributing to my sleep apnea, so I have done some research lately

      1 elevate your bed under the legs with boards (I did it about 6 inches) So far I have not had any coughing spells (which is sign of my type of reflux--am crossing my fingers)

      2 do not eat 6 hours before sleep

      3 do not eat big meals

      4 do not smoke, take caffeine, and eat big meals. also lose weight

      5 do not take peppermint as it weakens the sphincter muscle that is already over relaxing.

      6 I would suspect astringent herbs might help as they tighten flesh if one could maybe mix a tincture with honey or something sticky so it would stay longer in the throat/stomach areas. Oat bark is such an herb.

      7 take DGL-licorice this is very helpful I hear

      8 take aloe vera juice at least 2 oz

      9 take mucilaginous (demulcent) herbs to soothe inflamed tissues like tinctures of mullein, comfrey, licorice, marshmallow, slippery elm, chickweed, hollyhock and other ones and expectorant herbs like wild cherry, lobelia, and horehound

      10 try drinking raw apple cider vinegar three times a day. Use the kind with the mother --brand name braggs or spectrum about 1-2 inches in a glass then fill with water. May add raw honey or sea salt if desired,

      do try the cabbage juice---a quart a day of fresh juiced. he took it for 3-4 weeks

      http://curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1391353

      also though doctors give you dangerous drugs to reduce stomach acids some think the stomach acid is not enough not too much by reducing it one is harming the absorption of nutrients etc more. this is why the acidic apple cider vinegar helps people in practice

  26. QUESTION:
    Is an infant breathing monitor necessary for paranoid moms?
    I'm 32 weeks pregnant and have a paralyzing fear that my baby will die of SIDS once he is born. I was wondering if an infant breathing monitor is a wise or unwise investment; I know that false alarms are likely to make me more paranoid than ever, but I would love having the piece of mind. Any thoughts or suggestions? Help!?

    • ANSWER:
      Those things will make insane. They tend to go off at random, so you'll start thinking your baby has some kind of undiagnosed breathing problem like sleep apnea, but it's really only the monitor being stupid. Trust me, waking up at all hours because the breathing monitor alarm is going off is not peace of mind. It's an exercise in terror. Plus, your baby will probably not appreciate you bursting into the nursery in a panic every night.

      A normal baby monitor will do ya just fine. Always follow the AAP recommendations for reducing the chances of SIDS. Put your baby to sleep on his/her back, do not use a crib bumper, keep pillows and stuffed animals out of the bed, and make sure you get a firm mattress with a snug-fitting sheet. If you're really paranoid, you can use sleep sacks and/or swaddling blankets instead of traditional blankets.

      I kept both my kids in a bassinet in my bedroom for the first three months, just for peace of mind. And it was easier to get to them for nighttime feedings and diaper changes.

      Good luck!

  27. QUESTION:
    "How severe can the obstructive sleep apnea be?

    • ANSWER:
      Very. I have severe sleep apnea and it kinda shut down puberty. I found out I had sleep apnea when I was 40.

      Problems for undiagnosed sleep apnea include weight gain, physical problems, sleepiness.

      Nowadays its more well known. When I was a kid they didn't even have a therapy for it, even if they knew you had it!

      The sleep titration study, the hospital gig where they find out if you have it, is easy. The therapy, a machine that helps you sleep, is easy. So get that taken care of!

  28. QUESTION:
    Has anyone tried the ju99 life force generator? What was the result?
    I suffer from depression and since I've tried medications even shock theraphy I thought there might be something to this "life force" thing.

    • ANSWER:
      To me,i dont "believe" in the machine that you are talking about and my opinion would be to say your money.
      You didnt mention what you have tried specifically but there are also some herbal medicines that can help with some types of depression too.
      Assuming that you've tried them also,then to me you should get lots more diagnostic testing to determine whether your depression is really just depression or whether its a secondary process and if theres an underlying undiagnosed medical condition causing it because theres quite a large range of medical conditions that can cause depression/depressive like symptoms eg: carcinoids,hypothyroidism,vitamin deficiencies,drug sideeffects,coeliacs,liver disorders,heart disease,tumors,TLE,sleep apnea and many more, that quite often do get unnoticed/undiagnosed if you have an old fashioned doctor that doesnt see the connection between sometimes seemingly related symptoms & thinks that depression symptoms are always of "strictly" mind origin/process.

  29. QUESTION:
    Does anyone else suffer with this sleeping disorder?
    Its still undiagnosed, but this is the pattern that can vary through the week;
    Normal day awake - normal night asleep
    Awake all day all night
    Asleep all day all night
    Asleep all day
    Normal day awake - normal night asleep
    Ect Ect...
    ? X

    • ANSWER:
      I work a job that I have to work what ever shift they ask me to. So my sleeping pattern is kind of like yours. Sometimes I'm up for 50 hours at a time and sometimes I'm asleep for 20 hours at a time. But i do suffer from sleep apnea and Sleep paralysis, though.

  30. QUESTION:
    Can narcolepsy be detected by physical examination?
    Or can by physical examination a doctor say for sure that a person does not have narcolepsy? Physical examination means eye movements etc..

    • ANSWER:
      no. the only way to get a true diagnosis is with testing.

      sometimes bloodwork will show the genetic anomaly for narcolepsy, but it's absence should not rule out this disorder as not all cases are hereditary.

      most often though, a dr will do a polysomnogram (sleep study) and a Multiple Sleep Latency Test. during the sleep study, they'll hook you up to leads that can read exactly what is happening with your brain waves while you sleep at night, then have you do multiple naps the next day to see what happens during those as well. these tests can diagnose or rule out a number of sleep disorders (narcolepsy, apnea, rls, plmd to name a few)...and is really the only true way to tell if someone has narcolepsy.

      keep in mind that a patient needs to present with symptoms of this disorder in order for a doc to go ahead with the tests. if nothing in the patient's interview or exam shows signs of it, then a doc won't likely order the sleep studies to be done.

      if a patient DOES complain of narcolepsy-like symptoms & the doc doesn't have the tests done, though, i'd suggest looking for a second opinion. narcolepsy is much more common than people realize...and it goes undiagnosed for many years for the average person with it because it's symptoms can be seen in other disorders too.

  31. QUESTION:
    Can I develop an ovary cyst any time of the month?
    I believe I have an undiagnosed case of PCOS, I rarely get a period. And I thought earlier this month I was going to ovulate. I was going through the symptoms. I also had unprotected sex during this time, and for the past few weeks have been feeling pregnant. Something I have never gone through before, but after taking some tests, they came back negative. So I read how some ovary cyst form and can make you feel pregnant. So I know this could have happened. But my question is can I develop a cyst even if I wasn't trying to ovulate? I don't know if I was trying to or not, but I felt like was trying. If I would have got my period, I would have gotten it last week. I still have one more test that I will take in a week. But I just want some thoughts on this. Thanks guys!

    • ANSWER:
      PCOS is so much more, has a lot more symptoms and helps you be infertile. It doesnt happen during ovulation. It doesnt make you feel like you are pregnant. It causes tiredness, cramps, i.Infertility
      ii.Hirsutism
      iii.Cysts
      iv.Acne
      v.Weight gain/obesity
      vi.Male pattern baldness or thinning hair
      vii.Patches of skin
      viii.Skin tags
      ix.Pelvic pain
      x.Anxiety or depression
      xi.Sleep apnea
      and thats just a few. there is no cure for it just some treatments that can help the individual symptoms. Most women will go undiagnosed with it. Only about 5% of woman have this I have know i have it for 6 years now

  32. QUESTION:
    sleep apnea and my mum wont take me to the doctors?
    im 13 please don't say go on your own or ask a friend to take you please don't, because its not possible for me.
    I have most of the symptoms, tiredness, sore throat when i wake up, sour tastes in my mouth.

    my mum thinks im lying and wont take me and apparently it can kill you if its left undiagnosed, she thinks my snoring has nothing to do with it.

    please help me

    • ANSWER:
      Well, I think your mom should take to the sleep lab and test you. Unfortunately this test is pretty expensive, and if one doesn t have medical insurance could be unaffordable for many people. There is cheaper solution here however. You can buy oximeter with download data capability and monitor your sleep at home. If you indeed have a sleep apnea your pulse rate should jump up and oxygen consumption should drop down. If you have couple of episodes like it during the night it is a strong indication your have sleep apnea.

      http://www.sleepapneasymptom.medgrip.com/oximeters_for_home_use.html

  33. QUESTION:
    Can one be addicted to sleep?
    We're learning about addiction in school, and I had a question.
    We learned that when someone does whatever they are addicted to (drugs, alcohol, gambling, shopping, etc.) it raises dopamine levels in their brain.
    I realize that some people are just extremely tired all the time, but that's not what I'm talking about. Can one actually develop an addiction to sleep in the same way a person can develop an addiction to any of the things I mentioned above?

    Silly question, but I was curious..
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      No. No such addiction has been discovered.

      Being constantly tired is generally a side effect of something else:

      Depression certainly comes to mind since we're in the mental health section of Yahoo! Answers, but one could also have undiagnosed diabetes, mono, or a myriad of other health problems. It could be as simple as a nose or throat problem that can be causing severe sleep apnea.

      There are many things that can cause constant fatigue. Best way to find out? Get with your family doctor.

      Good luck!

  34. QUESTION:
    How can a person stop snoring?
    I mean without surgery ...

    • ANSWER:
      Snoring can be a sign of a sleep disorder called OSA. Sleep apnea, also called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), is a common disorder that affects more than 18 million people in the United States. In many of these people, the condition is undiagnosed. OSA takes its name from the Greek word apnea, which means "without breath." People with sleep apnea literally stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, often for a minute or longer and as many as hundreds of times during a single night.

      Several treatment options exist for dealing with OSA. These include weight reduction, oral appliances, positional therapy, positive pressure therapy, and surgical options.

      Weight gain is a significant risk factor for the development of OSA. While sleep apnea usually can be corrected by weight loss, other factors involved in the pathophysiology of OSA, such as anatomic abnormalities, may cause the condition to persist. However, the vast majority of OSA cases can be improved, if not eliminated, with significant weight loss. The amount of weight a patient needs to lose to achieve these benefits varies. Some may need only a modest reduction in weight to gain improvement, while others require significant weight loss. It is not necessary to slim down to "ideal body weight" to achieve these benefits.

      Sleep apnea can be caused by either complete obstruction of the airway (obstructive apnea) or partial obstruction (obstructive hypopnea hypopnea is slow, shallow breathing), both of which can wake one up. There are three types of sleep apnea obstructive, central, and mixed. Of these, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common. OSA occurs in approximately 2 percent of women and 4 percent of men over the age of 35.

  35. QUESTION:
    Can sleeping too much be a bad thing?
    Like 12-14 hours of sleep...
    Are there any potential health threats that might arise from this?
    Not fatter, I doubt that, I loss a couple of weight for sleeping this much x_x

    • ANSWER:
      just missin g out.. and neck aches... h/o let me think...............................................It's true a good night's sleep is essential for health. But oversleeping has been linked to a host of medical problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and increased risk of death.

      Researchers are careful to note, however, that two other factors -- depression and low socioeconomic status -- are strongly associated with oversleeping. Those two factors may be the reason for the observed negative health effects. For example, people of lower socioeconomic status may have less access to health care and therefore more undiagnosed illnesses, such as heart disease, which, in turn, may cause oversleeping.

      Oversleeping: How Much Sleep Is Too Much?
      The amount of sleep you need varies significantly over the course of your lifetime. It depends on your age and activity level as well as your general health and lifestyle habits. For instance, during periods of stress or illness, you may feel an increased need for sleep. But although sleep needs differ over time and from person to person, experts typically recommend that adults should sleep between seven and nine hours each night.

      Why Do People Sleep Too Much?
      For people who suffer from hypersomnia, oversleeping is actually a medical disorder. The condition causes people to suffer from extreme sleepiness throughout the day, which is not usually relieved by napping. It also causes them to sleep for unusually long periods of time at night. Many people with hypersomnia experience symptoms of anxiety, low energy, and memory problems as a result of their almost constant need for sleep.

      Obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder that causes people to stop breathing momentarily during sleep, can also lead to an increased need for sleep. That's because it disrupts the normal sleep cycle.

      Of course, not everyone who oversleeps has a sleep disorder. Other possible causes of oversleeping include the use of certain substances, such as alcohol and some prescription medications. Other medical conditions, including depression, can cause people to oversleep. And then there are people who simply enjoy sleeping for long periods of time.

      Medical Problems Linked to Oversleeping
      Diabetes. In a study of almost 9,000 Americans, researchers found a relationship between sleep and the risk of diabetes. People who slept more than nine hours each night had a 50% greater risk of diabetes than people who slept seven hours per night. This increased risk was also seen in people who slept less than five hours per night. The researchers did not draw conclusions about the physiological link between long sleep and diabetes. But they did suggest that oversleeping could be indicative of underlying medical problems that increase the likelihood of diabetes.

      Obesity. Sleeping too much could make you weigh too much, as well. One recent study showed that people who slept for nine or 10 hours every night were 21% more likely to become obese over a six-year period than were people who slept between seven and eight hours. This association between sleep and obesity remained the same even when food intake and exercise were taken into account.

  36. QUESTION:
    what could be causing my joint pain and weakness?
    I am only 18 years old and experience weakness, fatigue, and joint pain. I eat relatively well, take vitamins, and get moderate exercise.The only medication im on is depo provera (injection form of birth control) my mother is aneamic and i have never been tested could it be this? i just dont know why i an so weak and tired with so much joint pain (especially in wrists and ankles)

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe Iron Deficiency since it's closely related to anemia ?

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/iron-deficiency-anemia/DS00323

      Signs and symptoms of iron deficiency may include brittle nails, swelling or soreness of the tongue, cracks in the sides of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections.

      Some signs and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia are related to the condition's causes. For example, a sign of intestinal bleeding is bright red blood in the stools or black, tarry-looking stools.

      http://www.nutrientcor.com/nutrition-news/problems-with-unexplained-fatigue.php

      This highlights other potential problems like
      Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism)
      Vitamin B Deficiency
      Caffeine Overload
      Food Intolerances
      Enzyme Deficiencies.
      Leaky Gut Syndrome.
      Sleep Apnea
      Undiagnosed Heart Disease

  37. QUESTION:
    Is to much sleep bad for you?
    Kuzz i know someone that gets about 15.5 hours of sleep per day with no disorder or sickness or anything.

    • ANSWER:
      When it comes to sleep, can you have too much of a good thing? It's true a good night's sleep is essential for health. But oversleeping has been linked to a host of medical problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and increased risk of death.

      Researchers are careful to note, however, that two other factors -- depression and low socioeconomic status -- are strongly associated with oversleeping. Those two factors may be the reason for the observed negative health effects. For example, people of lower socioeconomic status may have less access to health care and therefore more undiagnosed illnesses, such as heart disease, which, in turn, may cause oversleeping.

      When it comes to myths about sleep, this one refuses to nod off -- and stay asleep. Contrary to popular opinion, older people don't need less sleep than the average person. In fact, adults require about the same amount of sleep from their 20s into old age, although the number of hours per night varies from person to person. But many older adults get much less sleep than they need, for a variety of reasons. Take Harry Gaertner, a 68-year-old retiree from Richardson, Texas. He remembers first being...

      Oversleeping: How Much Sleep Is Too Much?
      The amount of sleep you need varies significantly over the course of your lifetime. It depends on your age and activity level as well as your general health and lifestyle habits. For instance, during periods of stress or illness, you may feel an increased need for sleep. But although sleep needs differ over time and from person to person, experts typically recommend that adults should sleep between seven and nine hours each night.

      Why Do People Sleep Too Much?
      For people who suffer from hypersomnia, oversleeping is actually a medical disorder. The condition causes people to suffer from extreme sleepiness throughout the day, which is not usually relieved by napping. It also causes them to sleep for unusually long periods of time at night. Many people with hypersomnia experience symptoms of anxiety, low energy, and memory problems as a result of their almost constant need for sleep.

      Obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder that causes people to stop breathing momentarily during sleep, can also lead to an increased need for sleep. That's because it disrupts the normal sleep cycle.

      Of course, not everyone who oversleeps has a sleep disorder. Other possible causes of oversleeping include the use of certain substances, such as alcohol and some prescription medications. Other medical conditions, including depression, can cause people to oversleep. And then there are people who simply enjoy sleeping for long periods of time.

      Medical Problems Linked to Oversleeping

      - Diabetes
      - Obesity
      - Headaches
      - Back pain
      - Depression
      - Heart disease
      - Death

      Get the Benefits of Sleep Without Oversleeping

      If you average more than seven or eight hours of sleep per night, see a doctor for a checkup. The doctor can help you determine why you oversleep.

      If your oversleeping is caused by alcohol or certain prescription medications, cutting back on or eliminating the use of these substances may help. Similarly, if your oversleeping is caused by an underlying medical condition, treating this disorder may allow you to return to normal sleep habits.

      Regardless of the cause of your oversleeping, practicing good sleep hygiene will help you reap the benefits of a healthy seven to eight hours of sleep each night. Experts recommend keeping the same bedtimes and wake times every day. They also recommend avoiding caffeine and alcohol close to bedtime. Exercising regularly and making your bedroom a comfortable environment that's conducive to sleep will help you get the amount of sleep you need.

  38. QUESTION:
    is waking up more then 60 times in a night normal?
    I was talking to my manger the other night about sleep. As I was working two jobs at the time and going to school and telling him how i was always felling tired. (was working at UPS during the day then going to school right after I got off the some nights going straight to White Castle (my other job) from there and working night shift. It was killing me not getting no sleep and my work was suffering because of it. I sometimes find myself falling a sleep on my way home from working night shift. So I quit UPS hoping that would help out but I still have trouble sleeping.

    He told me that I may have sleep apnea.. he said that what it sounded like from what i was telling him. (he would know he has sleep apnea himself..))

    So last night, I decided to record myself sleeping to see if it was even remotely possible. I noted at least 61 times waking or making weird noises...

    Should I got see a doctor about this???

    • ANSWER:
      Were these noises of the gasping, chocking, coughing nature? Also, were you snoring? Lastly, did you hear yourself snoring, then stop for abit; then start snoring again and did this over and over?
      The more you answer yes; then the sooner you should be assess for sleep apnea. Also note if you awaken to headaches, dry mouth or frequent bathroom breaks.

      Undiagnosed sleep apnea can lead to high blood pressure, diabetes and some cancers.

      If you get a diagnosed with OSA; join a support group. I use CPAPTALK.COM

  39. QUESTION:
    Can people die from sleep apnea?
    If so, how common is it?

    • ANSWER:
      Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is more common than people think and can be quite serious.

      In addition to stopping breathing which can lower your oxygen levels, you are obstructing your airway which changes the pressures in your pulmonary blood system and can ultimately lead to pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure, and death. While these are the end-stage and highest degree of damage, undiagnosed OSA can add to these problems over the years.

      If you snore or someone has told you that you stop breathing in your sleep, get yourself to a doctor and get a sleep study done. It's really for your heart and oxygenation to your brain, the vitals!!

      **We screen for OSA before someone goes under anesthesia, because they are harder to manage during anesthesia, it's that serious!!

      I

  40. QUESTION:
    If you sleep to much, will you end up getting a sickness or disease?

    • ANSWER:
      When it comes to sleep, can you have too much of a good thing? It's true a good night's sleep is essential for health. But oversleeping has been linked to a host of medical problems, including diabetes, heart disease, and increased risk of death.

      Researchers are careful to note, however, that two other factors -- depression and low socioeconomic status -- are strongly associated with oversleeping. Those two factors may be the reason for the observed negative health effects. For example, people of lower socioeconomic status may have less access to health care and therefore more undiagnosed illnesses, such as heart disease, which, in turn, may cause oversleeping.
      Oversleeping: How Much Sleep Is Too Much?

      The amount of sleep you need varies significantly over the course of your lifetime. It depends on your age and activity level as well as your general health and lifestyle habits. For instance, during periods of stress or illness, you may feel an increased need for sleep. But although sleep needs differ over time and from person to person, experts typically recommend that adults should sleep between seven and nine hours each night.
      Why Do People Sleep Too Much?

      For people who suffer from hypersomnia, oversleeping is actually a medical disorder. The condition causes people to suffer from extreme sleepiness throughout the day, which is not usually relieved by napping. It also causes them to sleep for unusually long periods of time at night. Many people with hypersomnia experience symptoms of anxiety, low energy, and memory problems as a result of their almost constant need for sleep.

      Obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder that causes people to stop breathing momentarily during sleep, can also lead to an increased need for sleep. That's because it disrupts the normal sleep cycle.

      Of course, not everyone who oversleeps has a sleep disorder. Other possible causes of oversleeping include the use of certain substances, such as alcohol and some prescription medications. Other medical conditions, including depression, can cause people to oversleep. And then there are people who simply enjoy sleeping for long periods of time.
      Medical Problems Linked to Oversleeping

      Diabetes. In a study of almost 9,000 Americans, researchers found a relationship between sleep and the risk of diabetes. People who slept more than nine hours each night had a 50% greater risk of diabetes than people who slept seven hours per night. This increased risk was also seen in people who slept less than five hours per night. The researchers did not draw conclusions about the physiological link between long sleep and diabetes. But they did suggest that oversleeping could be indicative of underlying medical problems that increase the likelihood of diabetes.

      Obesity. Sleeping too much could make you weigh too much, as well. One recent study showed that people who slept for nine or 10 hours every night were 21% more likely to become obese over a six-year period than were people who slept between seven and eight hours. This association between sleep and obesity remained the same even when food intake and exercise were taken into account.

  41. QUESTION:
    The effects of diabetes type 2 that worry me?
    I know that all of them worry me - but I want to know if this is true.
    DIABETES TYPE 2
    Are these true?
    1. Diabetes makes you run slower!?
    2. Diabetes makes you dumber all the time!?
    3. Diabetes makes you less fit???
    4. Diabetes makes you die really early!?

    • ANSWER:
      Your question is not only very ignorant, it is rude, insensative, and insulting to all diabetics.

      The answer to all your questions is NO!

      Now instead of your repetitive postings of more ignorant insulting questions educate yourself.

      Read all you can read on diabetes online.

      Read more about diabetes and sleep apnea at Wikipedia at:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_apnea

      There have been studies linking sleep apnea and diabetes.

      With untreated sleep apnea a person does not get the good sleep that everyone needs. You would not believe the number of people with undiagnosed sleep apnea.

      A lot of people that have the symptoms of sleep apnea and are usually unaware.

      Read more from the American Diabetes Association at:

      http://www.diabetes.org

      Also see the Diabetes Dictionary at:

      http://www.diabetes.org/diabetesdictionary.jsp?WTLPromo=FOOTER_dictionary&vms=279113356648

      Use Yahoo search and/or google to find more, instead of posting more ignorant, insulting questions on the same subject!

      Everyone should read this from:

      http://answers.yahoo.com/info/disclaimer

      Special admonition for Yahoo! Answers relating to health matters

      Yahoo! Answers is provided for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional before starting any new treatment or making any changes to existing treatment. Do not delay seeking or disregard medical advice based on Q&A Content on this site. No health-related Q&A Content on Yahoo! Answers, including information about herbal therapies and other dietary supplements, is regulated or evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and therefore the information should not be used to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease without the supervision of a medical doctor or other qualified health professional.

  42. QUESTION:
    will my child have sleeping problems?
    when i was a child would stop breathing in my sleep and had to be hooked up to monitors to make sure i was breathing. would or could that be passed on to my children?

    • ANSWER:
      It is a possibility. You most likely had sleep apnea when you were a child and it is hereditary. I am a sleep physician and sleep apnea can be passed on but there is a small chance of it.

      If your child has these conditions please go to a doctor and get him checked out because he probably has sleep apnea:

      loud snoring
      morning headaches
      unrefreshing sleep
      a dry mouth upon awakening
      chest retraction during sleep in young children (chest pulls in)
      high blood pressure
      overweight
      irritability
      change in personality
      depression
      difficulty concentrating
      excessive perspiring during sleep
      heartburn
      reduced libido
      insomnia
      frequent nocturnal urination (nocturia)
      restless sleep
      nocturnal snorting, gasping, choking (may wake self up)
      rapid weight gain
      confusion upon awakening

      Even though most of the above listed associations aren't too severe sleep apnea can be VERY serious. It is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires immediate medical attention. The risks of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea include heart attacks, strokes, impotence, irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure and heart disease. In addition, obstructive sleep apnea causes daytime sleepiness that can result in accidents, lost productivity and interpersonal relationship problems. The severity of the symptoms may be mild, moderate or severe.

      I hope I helped and come visit me at my website: http://www.freesleepinfo.com/

  43. QUESTION:
    what is sleeping apnea and what are the symptoms?

    • ANSWER:
      Central sleep apnea is a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by changes in ventilatory drive without airway obstruction; most of these conditions cause asymptomatic changes in breathing pattern during sleep.
      Obstructive sleep apnea consists of episodes of partial or complete closure of the upper airway that occur during sleep and lead to breathing cessation (defined as a period of apnea > 10 sec). Symptoms include restlessness, snoring, recurrent awakening, morning headache, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Diagnosis is based on sleep history, and polysomnography. Treatment is with nasal continuous positive airway pressure, oral appliances, and, in refractory cases, surgery. Prognosis is good with treatment. Most cases remain undiagnosed and untreated and are often associated with hypertension, heart failure, and injury or death from motor vehicle crashes and other accidents resulting from hypersomnolence.
      Obstructive sleep apnea in children is episodes of partial or complete closure of the upper airway that occur during sleep and lead to breathing cessation. Symptoms include snoring and sometimes restless sleep, nocturnal sweating, and morning headache. Complications may include growth disturbance, cor pulmonale, pulmonary hypertension, and learning or behavioral disturbances. Diagnosis is by polysomnography. Treatment is usually adenotonsillectomy.

  44. QUESTION:
    How do you stop snoring?
    My husband tells me I snore and I did not believe him because no one has ever told me that before. He is a light sleeper so I thought I was probably just breathing hard in my sleep. But he was right I do snore I heard myself and it was so loud I woke my own self up snoring! I actually heard my snoring and I opened my eyes and he was looking at me and I said was that me? He just shook his head and smiled. What do I do for it?

    • ANSWER:
      sleep apnea. its whare you snore when your sleeping. go to the drs they will give you a sleep study its not that bad, it seems it and i was scared to go but its not that bad,

      The Greek word "apnea" literally means "without breath." There are three types of apnea: obstructive, central, and mixed; of the three, obstructive is the most common. Despite the difference in the root cause of each type, in all three, people with untreated sleep apnea stop breathing repeatedly during their sleep, sometimes hundreds of times during the night and often for a minute or longer.

      Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by a blockage of the airway, usually when the soft tissue in the rear of the throat collapses and closes during sleep. In central sleep apnea, the airway is not blocked but the brain fails to signal the muscles to breathe. Mixed apnea, as the name implies, is a combination of the two. With each apnea event, the brain briefly arouses people with sleep apnea in order for them to resume breathing, but consequently sleep is extremely fragmented and of poor quality.

      Sleep apnea is very common, as common as adult diabetes, and affects more than twelve million Americans, according to the National Institutes of Health. Risk factors include being male, overweight, and over the age of forty, but sleep apnea can strike anyone at any age, even children. Yet still because of the lack of awareness by the public and healthcare professionals, the vast majority remain undiagnosed and therefore untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences.

      Untreated, sleep apnea can cause high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease, memory problems, weight gain, impotency, and headaches. Moreover, untreated sleep apnea may be responsible for job impairment and motor vehicle crashes. Fortunately, sleep apnea can be diagnosed and treated. Several treatment options exist, and research into additional options continues

      BEING EVALUATED FOR SLEEP APNEA
      If you suspect that you have sleep apnea and need to see a doctor about your symptoms, we suggest that you first check your insurance policy before making any appointments. You may be required to get a referral to a sleep specialist from your primary care physician and/or you may be required to go to a certain testing facility. In some cases, your primary care physician orders the tests and receives the results for you. Keep in mind that you may be tested in a sleep center or laboratory or in your own home. Some insurance policies require specific consultation or procedures. You could undergo a "split-night" study in the sleep lab. (During a split-night study, the first half of the night is the testing phase. If the study shows you have sleep apnea, during the second half of the night you begin treatment for sleep apnea.)

      Doctors who know sleep medicine may be pulmonologists (specializing in lungs), neurologists (the brain), otolaryngologists (the ears, nose, and throat), psychiatry (mental health), or primary care physicians such as internists or family practitioners. Their expertise in the field of sleep may come from having trained with other sleep specialists and/or having studied sleep medicine through a residency program, continuing medical education (CME) courses, and scientific meetings. Some have taken additional tests and are "certified" by the American Board of Sleep Medicine (ABSM). In any case, a sleep doctor may hold one of many degrees that meet the requirements of the ABSM: an MD, DO, MB (the European equivalent of an MD), a PhD, or a PsyD in a health-related field. In addition, some dentists have studied sleep apnea and, when appropriate, treat sleep apnea patients by fitting them with an oral appliance. You should ask any doctor or dentist about his/her credentials and experience. You should also be satisfied with the explanations and how it will be diagnosed and treated in your particular case.

      If you are not given a list of doctors and sleep testing facilities, you can find a specialist referral from a few different sources. There is no one complete list of all such facilities, and as a non?profit organization, the American Sleep Apnea Association (ASAA) does not endorse or recommend any company, product, or health care provider. However, there is a list of physicians, sleep centers, and laboratories accredited by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine that pay their AASM membership dues. (The AASM, formerly known as the American Sleep Disorders Association or ASDA, is the professional society in the field of sleep medicine that accredits such facilities; accreditation implies adherence to a certain set of standards.) The most up?to?date list of accredited member sleep centers and laboratories appears on the AASM's web site: www.aasmnet.org. You can request a list from the ASAA as well. Remember that other centers are in the process of being accredited, have chosen not to be accredited, or do not qua

  45. QUESTION:
    Does anyone else have sleep apnea?
    Last night I stopped breathing and woke up gasping for air. I couldnt't fall back to sleep. This hasnt happened in awhile, the last time was probably last year. I got tested for this a few years back and the lab said that i have this condition. I'm wondering if i should tell my family that i love each of them in case something happens to me, yet I don't want to tell them because I don't want to make them worried.

    • ANSWER:
      Hope this Help you Dear!!

      What Is Sleep Apnea?
      Sleep apnea is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep.

      Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They often occur 5 to 30 times or more an hour. Typically, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.

      Sleep apnea usually is a chronic (ongoing) condition that disrupts your sleep 3 or more nights each week. You often move out of deep sleep and into light sleep when your breathing pauses or becomes shallow.

      This results in poor sleep quality that makes you tired during the day. Sleep apnea is one of the leading causes of excessive daytime sleepiness.

      Overview
      Sleep apnea often goes undiagnosed. Doctors usually can't detect the condition during routine office visits. Also, there are no blood tests for the condition.

      Most people who have sleep apnea don't know they have it because it only occurs during sleep. A family member and/or bed partner may first notice the signs of sleep apnea.

      The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. This most often means that the airway has collapsed or is blocked during sleep. The blockage may cause shallow breathing or breathing pauses.

      When you try to breathe, any air that squeezes past the blockage can cause loud snoring. Obstructive sleep apnea happens more often in people who are overweight, but it can affect anyone.

      Central sleep apnea is a less common type of sleep apnea. It happens when the area of your brain that controls your breathing doesn't send the correct signals to your breathing muscles. You make no effort to breathe for brief periods.

      Central sleep apnea often occurs with obstructive sleep apnea, but it can occur alone. Snoring doesn't typically happen with central sleep apnea

  46. QUESTION:
    I get up in the middle of the night and get dizzy, hot, and feel like I'm going to pass out..any ideas?
    Anyone have any suggestions on why this may be happening? I am also unusually tired lately.

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible that you might have a sleep apnea or Ondine's Curse (pretty much a sleep apnea you have from birth). A sleep apnea is when, during your sleep, you experience random pauses in breathing. The majority of people with this condition aren't aware that they have it because... well, they're sleeping when it happens (just like with snoring, you don't know you snore unless someone tells you).

      It seems to me that the dizziness and your feeling that you're going to pass out could be caused by a lack of oxygen due to a pause in your breathing while you're sleeping. Naturally, you'd be very tired if this is interrupting your sleep.

      Wikipedia claims that 1 in 15 Americans suffer from this condition and 85-90% go undiagnosed because they don't know that they have it. If this continues to persist, regardless of what it is, you should consult a sleep specialist or have your doctor refer you to one.

  47. QUESTION:
    Why do I wake up with a headache?
    Every morning I wake up with a terrible headache regardless whether I have consumed alcohol the previous night.

    • ANSWER:
      Thin phenomenon is called "morning headache," and if you websearch that term you will get a lot of good advice on the many things that can cause headaches specifically **first thing in the morning** which is the key to this question. According to this article please click this link:

      http://www.healthy.net/scr/article.aspx?Id=3100

      ...sleep apnea/snoring is one common cause of morning headache...and before you sneer and protest, "But I don't snore!" it might be best to check with a bed partner who may disagree. Millions of people have undiagnosed sleep apnea, and it is a health hazard. Snoring bed partners are another common cause of morning headaches, as is depression, anxiety, stress, TMJ/teeth grinding, limb movement disorders, hypertension, alcohol use (which I realize you said is not the issue here), use of certain prescription medications, being underweight OR overweight, dehydration, digestion issues, and poor-quality bedding. So as you can see, this complaint can have many different causes or related issues, and you'd really need to do some thinking about your own lifestyle and health to figure out which ones it could be.

      Wishing you good luck and good health.

  48. QUESTION:
    CPAP- Sleep Apnea- Gastric Bypass Surgery?
    During the surgery itsself, do they put a CPAP machine on a patient with Sleep Apnea for the duration of the surgery? I ask because I had an outpatient surgery in 2009, and my apnea was undiagnosed. They couldn't keep me breathing and I was tachycardic as a result.

    I recognize sleep apnea to be a common occurance in Bariatric Surgery candidiates. I just wonder if anyone has experience with this.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      As part of your health history prior to any surgery, the anesthesiologist asks you whether you have sleep apnea and then, while asleep, they adjust the pressure of the ventilations to compensate for this which would prevent what happened to you in 2009. They do not put a CPAP machine on you during surgery.

  49. QUESTION:
    sleep apnea and anesthesia?
    ok my mother had an ankle replacement last April. She was in surgery over 4 hours and afterwards was moved to ICU because her oxygen level was low and they couldn't get it up. They said it was because undiagnosed Sleep Apnea. Well back in 2008 she went under for another surgery yet it was minor and was in surgery no longer than an hour in a half. And she had no issues with that surgery. Well she is going to have surgery this week for gallbladder and I am extremely nervous. I can't imagine loosing my mom at a time like and right before Christmas. Does anyone have any exprience with sleep apnea and surgery? I mean this surgery probably won't even last an hour unless there is issues and they have to open her up.
    Yes, they are aware. Im just confused why 2 years ago she had no issues but this last surgery was a big issue. Does it effect you worse the longer you are under?
    and no she hasn't gained any weight since that first surgery. If anything, has lost. ILike I said Im curious if anyone know if it has to do with how long you are under and how much is given

    • ANSWER:
      The problem was from the doctors not knowing about the sleep apnea. Assuming that information is conveyed to them during future preoperative work ups, they can be prepared for any problems and even take steps to keep it from happening.

      Edit:

      The effects certainly can be worse the longer you are under. Another question is... Has she gained weight in these last couple of years. That's a big factor in worsening the severity of sleep apnea.

  50. QUESTION:
    I am tired most of the time. Any LEGAL suggestions on how to get energy?

    • ANSWER:
      Short of amping ones self on caffeine and god knows what else they put in Sobe No Fear (my pick me up of choice). Here's a number of pointers from a registered sleep tech:

      Establish a good routine for you sleep schedule:
      bed at same time, wake at same time sort of business. Don't let weekend get you out of whack.

      Get a full 8 hours of sleep. Although, many need somewhat more or less than that based on age and individual differences....8's a good average to start with.

      No caffeine for 6-8 hours prior to bed

      Do not work out 1-2 hours prior to bed

      No TV or reading in bed (train to body to only sleep in bed, well and other necessary activities with one's mate)

      If you have difficulty sleeping due to thinking too much about...well anything that keeps you up....things to do etc. Try to write everything down that you will be doing for the next day before bed so that you won't need to think about it in bed.

      If you are sensitive to noise, try earplugs, or blindfold if having light issues.

      Stress can always add to the problem, try to relax!

      OK, now the really important stuff...as many mentioned...this could be a health issue. The most common problem (and often undiagnosed) for being tired all the time is obstructive sleep apnea. This is the bread and butter of the sleep field in general. No way I could tell you without a complete history, a couple dozen wires and a few hours, if this is the problem. Go to a sleep lab, they are everywhere, doesn't hurt to have a test run eh. However, here's a few things to red flag ya:

      Are you tired all the time...clearly yes
      Are you at all overweight.
      Do you have a 15" neck or larger.
      Do you snore.
      Do you wake up with dry mouth or headaches.
      Do you or anyone in your family have any history of heart problems, particularly Congestive Heart Failure.
      Does anyone in your family snore or have Obstructive Sleep Apnea.
      Do you get up to go to the bathroom several times a night.
      Forgetfullness
      Impotence
      ummmm....I'm sure I've left a few things off....anywho...

      If anything on this list pops out, and even if they don't for that matter, go have a test at your local sleep lab.

      On a more rare note, there is other sleep disorders that could make you tired all the time....say narcolepsy, insomnia, parasomnias, periodic leg movements, etc. Everything can be evaluated at a sleep disorders center, generally one doctor referal away.

      Good luck!

sleep apnea undiagnosed

Sleep Apnea Usmle

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body (sequelae). In sleep apnea, your breathing stops or gets very shallow while you are sleeping. Each pause in breathing typically lasts 10 to 20 seconds or more. These pauses can occur 20 to 30 times or more an hour. Symptoms may be present for years, even decades without identification, during which time the sufferer may become conditioned to the daytime sleepiness and fatigue associated with significant levels of sleep disturbance. In adults, the most typical individual with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is obese, with particular heaviness at the face and neck. The hallmark symptom of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in adults is excessive daytime sleepiness. Typically, an adult or adolescent with severe long-standing obstructive sleep apnea will fall asleep for very brief periods in the course of usual daytime activities if given any opportunity to sit or rest. Sleep apnea is recognized as a problem by others witnessing the individual during episodes or is suspected because of its effects on the body.

Sleep apnea is a common disorder that can be very serious. There are two distinct forms of sleep apnea: Central and Obstructive. Sleep apnea can cause high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease, memory problems, weight gain, impotency, and headaches. Obstructive sleep apnea is the most common category of sleep-disordered breathing. The prevalence of OSA among the adult population in western Europe and North America. The hallmark symptom of the disorder is excessive daytime sleepiness. Additional symptoms of sleep apnea include restless sleep, loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps), falling asleep during the day, morning headaches, trouble concentrating, irritability, forgetfulness, mood or behavior changes, anxiety, and depression. Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA). A more invasive surgery usually only tried in difficult cases where other surgeries have not relieved the patient's OSA. Apneas are usually measured during sleep (preferably in all stages of sleep) over a two-hour period.

Weight reduction and avoiding alcohol and sedatives may help some individuals. Surgery to remove excess tissue at the back of the throat , to remove enlarged tonsils or adenoids ,or to create an opening in the trachea to bypass the obstructed airway during sleep. Sleep Apnea in children where removing the tonsils or adenoids does not take care of the problem is usually treated with a C-PAP (continous positive airway pressure) or Bi-Level positive airway pressure. C-PAP is a machine that blows air into your nose via a nose mask, keeping the airway open and unobstructed. Bi-Level has an inspiratory pressure that is higher than the expiratory pressure. Some children have facial deformities that may cause the sleep apnea. Maxillomandibular advancement. In this procedure, the upper and lower part of your jaw is moved forward from the remainder of your face bones. Tracheostomy is used in persons with severe, life- threatening sleep apnea. Laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) is done to eliminate snoring but has not been shown to be effective in treating sleep apnea.

Sleep Apnea Treatment Tips

1. Behavioral Therapy-Is usually all that is needed for a mild case. It changes the person behavior towards the use of alcohol, tobacco which affects the airway.

2. Physical or Mechanical Therapy- The therapy provides air pressure to keep the airway from narrowing.

3. Surgery is considered only when other alternative therapy failed or if the patient volunteered to.

4. Avoid or at least limit alcohol intake.

5. Avoid or limit the use of tranquilizers, sleeping pills.

6. Avoid sleeping on your back.

7. Oxygen and medications may have adjunctive roles in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in some patients.

8. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, which removes excess tissue in the throat to make the airway wider.

9. Tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, which removes the tonsils and/or the adenoids.

10. Tracheostomy, which creates a hole in the windpipe (trachea). A tube is then put in the hole to bring air in.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    which is better mayo clinic internal medicine review or john hopkins internal medicine review?
    ive been preparing for usmle lately and i want to know which of these 2 is better for internal medicine in preparation for both step 2ck and 3 as well. though havent heard about people who used these instead but i do want a more in depth grasp in internal medicine since i want to be in this residency program someday. thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      i vote for anything other than Mayo. Yes they are world reknowned, but a friend of mine was there a little over a year ago for nosebleeds, and he has sleep apnea at the time.

      Well, last march he was diagnosed with Squemous Cell Carsinoma, and the nosebleeds and Apnea were attributed to the cancer. They had taken x-rays and MRI's at Mayo, yet they said nothing to him.

      He could have been treated there a LONG time ago and not have to go through the extensive treatments he has to go through now

sleep apnea usmle

Sleep Apnea Ucsf

With all the available medical treatments for sleep apnea, the vast majority of cases still remain undiagnosed and untreated due to a lack of awareness. To further increase the awareness concerning sleep apnea, the American Sleep Apnea Association is looking for sleep apnea patients and encouraging them to share their concerns. This may be the best medication yet! The ASAA believes that, by promoting awareness among the sufferers themselves, they will be able to prevent more cases from going undiagnosed. This method was established to promote information effectively just like a homepage on the internet which provides pop-up boxes for inquiries, testimonials, and related stories. In the case of the ASAA plan, formerly treated patients will hopefully create pop-up diagnoses amongst their friends, family members or acquaintances who were previously undiagnosed. The diabetes society and cancer society, for example, use this same technique to promote awareness through their previously diagnosed patients.

Of course, like any other disease or health condition, medical research has come up with many forms of medication for sleep apnea. These medications are usually oral and they prevent and control muscle collapse in the throat which occurs during sleep. This is what causes airway blockage and then results in sleep apnea. It won't be you who will determine the suitable treatment however! It is only your doctor who can determine which treatment will be best.

There are many medicated treatment plans for sleep apnea and one of the more famous and intriguing approaches that has shown great results is the Pilar Procedure. This procedure is carried out by placing three small woven inserts into the soft palate of the mouth. This reduces the vibrations that cause the snoring noise in sleep apnea patients. According to the FDA, this treatment is approved and is virtually pain free. About eighty percent of all patients suffering from sleep apnea and snoring have been satisfied with the comfortable effect of this approach. This is even true considering that it can be done in one simple office visit!

Treatment of the more mild cases of sleep apnea is often done through changes in lifestyle. These changes in lifestyle include avoiding medication that causes relaxation of the central nervous system such as sedatives and muscle relaxants. Instead, they incorporate the losing of weight, the quitting of smoking and the avoidance of alcohol. They also involve sleeping in a different position with the help of a special pillow. This pillow is a device that keeps you from sleeping on your back to keep the airway open during sleep. This tells us that good posture while sleeping contributes to the quality of sleep. The likes of a water bed or a good quality bed mattress, for instance, may also provide a comfortable and relaxing position that result in a deeper sleep.

Less fortunate individuals who suffer from a more severe case of sleep apnea are typically treated using air blowing machines called Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (C-PAP) machines. This instrument blows air into the nose of the patient via a tube and a mask. For a more severe situation, another type of machine called a Bi-Level Machine (Bi-PAP) works by blowing two different pressures of air to help the lungs breathe in and out properly.

In cases where the modification of either the uvula or the dangling tissue at the rear of the throat is needed, uvulopalatopharygoplasty or UPPP is a form of surgery that can be carried out. In children, Adenotonsillectomy along with weight normalization is considered to be the first line of treatment. This procedure is characterized by the removal of tonsils and adenoids to increase the cross-sectional airway of the patient. Occasionally, medical procedures such as these only help the problem but do not totally eliminate it. Therefore, they must still be accompanied by a device like a C-PAP, nasal mask, face mask, gel mask or nasal pillow.

Keeping your healthy lifestyle and regaining your happy family life are the most significant reasons for seeking medical treatment for sleep apnea. Bear in mind that only a doctor can determine the causes and the type of the treatment which suits you best. It is up to you to seek out the proper diagnosis from a doctor and attend to this very serious problem of sleep apnea

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    I have severe GIRD from car accident. Any doc or nurse know how serious this can be? if I don't get the help?
    I am literallly scared to death over this. I have had two laperscopic surgeries to pull my stomach, which had traveled behind my heart, & put it back where it belong. I lost most of the fundus then. SEcond surgery worse. Now I am being sent to UCSF and they want to slice me open and take what is left of the stomach and repair my already damaged esphoagus.
    When it comes to surgeries if something can go wrong it will. my teeth are thinning, my throat is full of bumps & lesions. I have amstha induced by this. I have trouble swalling. I have to have oxygen at night & cpat breather machine to keep me breathing at night. My 02 went down to 83% when tested. I keep avoiding the surgery. I am 57 yr old with some other heavy duity health issues. And SF is a three hour drive. I can no longer drive because I fall asleep behind the wheel. I am ageing way to fast.
    So do I have the surgery or live my life out as it is now? what are the chances of it becoming cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      If you have been told that you have Barrett's Esophagus this is of course a precancerous condition. With continued severe gerd you are putting your life on the line in more than one way. The gerd caused the barretts esophagus and is what will cause it to become cancerous. Your lung problems could very well be from gerd and if so you will have increasing lung problems if the reflux is severe. The trouble swallowing could be from several sources but can be caused by damage from severe gerd. Even though you have sleep apnea and are on cpap you are also probably loosing sleep due to night time reflux. There are, as you already know, many potential problems caused by gerd.
      If it were me, I would ask the doctor "how will this surgery improve my quality of life" and also"will this significantly improve my lifespan"
      Then the decision is up to you.

sleep apnea ucsf

Sleep Apnea Uppp

With all the available medical treatments for sleep apnea, the vast majority of cases still remain undiagnosed and untreated due to a lack of awareness. To further increase the awareness concerning sleep apnea, the American Sleep Apnea Association is looking for sleep apnea patients and encouraging them to share their concerns. This may be the best medication yet! The ASAA believes that, by promoting awareness among the sufferers themselves, they will be able to prevent more cases from going undiagnosed. This method was established to promote information effectively just like a homepage on the internet which provides pop-up boxes for inquiries, testimonials, and related stories. In the case of the ASAA plan, formerly treated patients will hopefully create pop-up diagnoses amongst their friends, family members or acquaintances who were previously undiagnosed. The diabetes society and cancer society, for example, use this same technique to promote awareness through their previously diagnosed patients.

Of course, like any other disease or health condition, medical research has come up with many forms of medication for sleep apnea. These medications are usually oral and they prevent and control muscle collapse in the throat which occurs during sleep. This is what causes airway blockage and then results in sleep apnea. It won't be you who will determine the suitable treatment however! It is only your doctor who can determine which treatment will be best.

There are many medicated treatment plans for sleep apnea and one of the more famous and intriguing approaches that has shown great results is the Pilar Procedure. This procedure is carried out by placing three small woven inserts into the soft palate of the mouth. This reduces the vibrations that cause the snoring noise in sleep apnea patients. According to the FDA, this treatment is approved and is virtually pain free. About eighty percent of all patients suffering from sleep apnea and snoring have been satisfied with the comfortable effect of this approach. This is even true considering that it can be done in one simple office visit!

Treatment of the more mild cases of sleep apnea is often done through changes in lifestyle. These changes in lifestyle include avoiding medication that causes relaxation of the central nervous system such as sedatives and muscle relaxants. Instead, they incorporate the losing of weight, the quitting of smoking and the avoidance of alcohol. They also involve sleeping in a different position with the help of a special pillow. This pillow is a device that keeps you from sleeping on your back to keep the airway open during sleep. This tells us that good posture while sleeping contributes to the quality of sleep. The likes of a water bed or a good quality bed mattress, for instance, may also provide a comfortable and relaxing position that result in a deeper sleep.

Less fortunate individuals who suffer from a more severe case of sleep apnea are typically treated using air blowing machines called Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (C-PAP) machines. This instrument blows air into the nose of the patient via a tube and a mask. For a more severe situation, another type of machine called a Bi-Level Machine (Bi-PAP) works by blowing two different pressures of air to help the lungs breathe in and out properly.

In cases where the modification of either the uvula or the dangling tissue at the rear of the throat is needed, uvulopalatopharygoplasty or UPPP is a form of surgery that can be carried out. In children, Adenotonsillectomy along with weight normalization is considered to be the first line of treatment. This procedure is characterized by the removal of tonsils and adenoids to increase the cross-sectional airway of the patient. Occasionally, medical procedures such as these only help the problem but do not totally eliminate it. Therefore, they must still be accompanied by a device like a C-PAP, nasal mask, face mask, gel mask or nasal pillow.

Keeping your healthy lifestyle and regaining your happy family life are the most significant reasons for seeking medical treatment for sleep apnea. Bear in mind that only a doctor can determine the causes and the type of the treatment which suits you best. It is up to you to seek out the proper diagnosis from a doctor and attend to this very serious problem of sleep apnea

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the best health tool to help sleep apnea?
    I know there are tools and machines to treat sleep apnea,,which do you recommend that I can order online that isn't a discomfort?
    Yes.. I;ve heard of apnea monitors but which brand?
    I get worried when I hear my father snoring then he doesn't breathe for 10 seconds then he takes a deep breath in

    • ANSWER:
      1 in 5 adults suffer from sleep apnea. It can be very dangerous so if you suspect sleep apnea is a problem it's best to see a doctor immediately.

      The question is about home remedies. This is not medical advice only a few possibilities to lessen the symptoms of sleep apnea.

      Lose weight - eat less and exercise more
      Lower blood pressure
      Stop smoking
      Stop the cause of heartburn
      No alcohol or sedatives before going to sleep.
      Keep regular sleeping times - sleep on your side
      Raise the head of the bead
      Dental appliances can sometimes help
      Use a humidifier
      Keep sinuses clear
      Stablize blood sugar

      Sleep apnea can affect anyone at any age, even children. However, risk factors include:
      * Male gender
      * Being overweight
      * Being over the age of forty
      * Having a large neck size (17 inches or greater in men and 16 inches or greater in women)
      * Having larger tonsils
      * Having a family history of sleep apnea

      In mild cases of sleep apnea, conservative therapy may be all that is needed. Conservative approaches include:
      * Lose weight
      * Avoid alcohol and sleeping pills
      * Change sleep positions to promote regular breathing
      * Stop smoking. Smoking can increase the swelling in the upper airway which may worsen both snoring and apnea.
      * Avoid sleeping on your back

      The most commonly performed surgical procedures for sleep apnea include:
      * Somnoplasty: A minimally invasive procedure to reduce the soft tissue in the upper airway.
      * Nasal surgery: Correction of nasal obstructions such as a deviated septum.
      * Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP): A procedure that removes soft tissue on the back of the throat and palate, increasing the width of the airway at the throat opening.
      * Mandibular maxillar advancement surgery: Invasive surgery to correct certain facial abnormalities or throat obstructions that contribute to sleep apnea.

  2. QUESTION:
    My husband had a sleep study done last night to determine if he has sleep apnea?
    He did not like the idea about using a CPAP mask. Is this the ONLY treatment for sleep apnea? If it is, will he have to use it for the rest of his life?

    Any body that uses something different? Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      i've done the research for you and i hope this will help..=)

      Treatment
      For milder cases of sleep apnea, your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes such as losing weight or quitting smoking. If these measures don't improve your signs and symptoms or if your apnea is moderate to severe, a number of other treatments are available. Certain devices can help open up a blocked airway. In other cases, surgery may be necessary.

      Treatments for obstructive sleep apnea may include:

      Therapies

      Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). If you have moderate to severe sleep apnea, you may benefit from a machine that delivers air pressure through a mask placed over your nose while you sleep. With CPAP (SEE-pap), the air pressure is somewhat greater than that of the surrounding air, and is just enough to keep your upper airway passages open, preventing apnea and snoring.

      Although CPAP is a preferred method of treating sleep apnea, some people find it cumbersome or uncomfortable. With some practice, most people learn to adjust the tension of the straps to obtain a comfortable and secure fit. You may need to try more than one type of mask to find one that's comfortable. Some people also benefit from using a humidifier along with their CPAP system.

      Don't just stop using the CPAP machine if you experience problems. Check with your doctor to see what modifications can be made to make you more comfortable. Additionally, contact your doctor if you are still snoring despite treatment or begin snoring again. If your weight changes, the pressure settings may need to be adjusted.

      Oral appliances. Another option is wearing an oral appliance designed to keep your throat open. CPAP is more effective than oral appliances, but oral appliances may be easier for you to use.Some are designed to open your throat by bringing your jaw forward, which can sometimes relieve snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnea.

      A number of devices are available from your dentist. You may need to try different devices before finding one that works for you. Once you find the right fit, you'll still need to follow up with your dentist at least every six months during the first year and then at least once a year after that to ensure that the fit is still good and to reassess your signs and symptoms.

      Surgery or other proceduresThe goal of surgery for sleep apnea is to remove excess tissue from your nose or throat that may be vibrating and causing you to snore, or that may be blocking your upper air passages and causing sleep apnea. Surgical options may include:
      Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP). During this procedure, your doctor removes tissue from the rear of your mouth and top of your throat. Your tonsils and adenoids usually are removed as well. This type of surgery may be successful in stopping throat structures from vibrating and causing snoring. However, it may be less successful in treating sleep apnea because tissue farther down your throat may still block your air passage. UPPP usually is performed in a hospital and requires a general anesthetic.
      Maxillomandibular advancement. In this procedure, the upper and lower part of your jaw is moved forward from the remainder of your face bones. This enlarges the space behind the tongue and soft palate, making obstruction less likely. This procedure may require the cooperation of an oral surgeon and an orthodontist, and at times may be combined with another procedure to improve the likelihood of success.
      Tracheostomy. You may need this form of surgery if other treatments have failed and you have severe, life-threatening sleep apnea. In this procedure, your surgeon makes an opening in your neck and inserts a metal or plastic tube through which you breathe. You keep the opening covered during the day. But at night you uncover it to allow air to pass in and out of your lungs, bypassing the blocked air passage in your throat.

      Removing tissues in the back of your throat with a laser (laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty) or with radiofrequency energy (radiofrequency ablation) are procedures that doctors sometimes use to treat snoring. However, these procedures aren't recommended for treating obstructive sleep apnea.

      Other types of surgery may help reduce snoring and sleep apnea by clearing or enlarging air passages:
      Nasal surgery to remove polyps or straighten a crooked partition between your nostrils (deviated nasal septum)
      Surgery to remove enlarged tonsils or adenoids

      Treatments for central sleep apnea are more limited and may include:
      Treatment for associated medical problems. Possible causes of central sleep apnea include heart or neuromuscular disorders, and treating those conditions may help. For example, optimizing therapy for heart failure may eliminate central sleep apnea.
      Supplemental oxygen. Using supplemental oxygen while you sleep may help if you have central sleep apnea. Various forms of oxygen are available as well as different devices to deliver oxygen to your lungs.
      Continuous positive airway pressure. This method, also used in obstructive sleep apnea, involves wearing a pressurized mask over your nose while you sleep. The mask is attached to a small pump that forces air through your airway to keep it from collapsing. CPAP may eliminate snoring and prevent sleep apnea. As with obstructive sleep apnea, it's important that you use the device as directed. If your mask is uncomfortable or the pressure feels too strong, talk with your doctor so that adjustments can be made.
      Bilevel positive airway pressure (bilevel PAP). Unlike CPAP, which supplies steady, constant pressure to your upper airway as you breathe in and out, bilevel PAP builds to a higher pressure when you inhale and decreases to a lower pressure when you exhale. The goal of this treatment is to boost the weak breathing pattern of central sleep apnea. Some bilevel PAP devices can be set to automatically deliver a breath if the device detects you haven't taken a breath after so many seconds.
      Adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV). This more recently approved airflow device is designed to treat central sleep apnea and complex sleep apnea. The device learns your normal breathing pattern and stores the information into a built-in computer. After you fall asleep, the machine uses pressure to normalize your breathing pattern and prevent pauses in your breathing.

  3. QUESTION:
    How do temporal lobe seizures affect sleep apnea?
    Can temporal lobe seizures cause severe sleep apnea? Or is it more likely that seizures of this nature are a result of chronic uncontrolled sleep apnea? I have both diagnoses, but my chief complaint is excessive daytime fatigue that is not relieved by CPAP, UPPP surgery, septoplasty, or medications for seizures.

    • ANSWER:
      that's terrible for you=all I have is sleep apnea and am so tired all the time =I don't know how you can take it with the seizures on top of it

  4. QUESTION:
    Is there anyone with sleep apnea who has had UPPP / tonsillectomy surgery and had success?
    I am scheduled for UPPP and tonsillectomy surgery in 3 months. I keep reading that these surgeries have a low success rate of curing apnea. Is there anyone who has had success with these procedures?

    • ANSWER:
      I have sleep apnea and have NOT undergone UPPP nor will I. Another closely related procedure is LAUPP (laser-assisted uvulopalaoplasty).

      You have not said why you are having this surgery, despite your reading that indicates (correctly) a poor success rate.

      UPPP is very painful and debilitating for up to a couple of weeks post surgery. As with all operations, there are a host of potential complications.

      These procedures have not withstood the rigors of time, follow-up and statistical analysis. While they may eliminate or reduce snoring, there does not appear to be any clear proof of lasting benefit in permanently eliminating obstructive sleep apnea.

      I'm sticking to my CPAP machine, which goes with me all over the world!

  5. QUESTION:
    Sleep Apnea: is it common to have mood swings AFTER treatment?
    My son-in-law recently began treatment for sleep apnea. He's 38 and has suffered from it his entire adult life, apparently. Now that he's getting proper sleep, he has started being verbally abusive. What's scarey is that he often can't remember saying things he has recently said! Is there any way to get him back to normal? Is his brain having trouble making connections after all this time? We are concerned for our daughter and grandson.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunatly this is not from sleep apnea treatment, it sounds like he is a jerk. The symptoms you list are more common in pretreatment. I'm assuming he uses a Bipap or had a UPPP, there is also a chance that the treatment is not working. I think that what he really needs is counceling. What he is doing is more common in narcotics users which is also a possibility.

  6. QUESTION:
    Do you think that doctors blame sleep problems on sleep apnea?
    Because they don't know the real reason why you can't sleep. Or is it a big money maker somehow?
    And yes I do know I snore. I was told that I do.
    I am in no way saying there are no good ethical doctors. I know of many good ethical and caring doctors.
    No I don't believe I have this. I am just saying is that is medically a popular condition to test for. And sometimes when they don't know the attribute the symptoms to apnea.

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep studies and UPPP's are big business.

  7. QUESTION:
    How do you cure sleep apnea without a breathing machine?
    My boyfriend has no insurance. He cannot afford a machine. He wakes tired from this condition and he is a carpenter. Hard work with power tools. I worry about him.

    • ANSWER:
      you can't cure sleep apnea even with a cpap machine. what you can do is get a uppp operation by a ent specialist or lose weight and do not drink alcohol before sleep. do not sleep flat on your back either. those things will help but you are right to be concerned.

  8. QUESTION:
    What causes snoring and how can it be stopped?
    My boyfriend recently started snoring a lot. It seems like it only happened when he sleeps on his back, but its getting to the point to where he keeps me up at night. I'm wondering what causes snoring. I would also like to know if anyone has any home remedies that might reduce it (and if you don't, just let me know what medications, nose strips, etc worked for you).

    • ANSWER:
      Snoring is caused by relaxed tissue vibrating. Some people who snore a lot have sleep apnea, some people do not. Many people who have sleep apnea snore, but some do not.

      Since he is waking you up at night, watch him for awhile while he is snoring. Does he appear to stop breathing? Does he have to start to wake himself in order to start breathing again? If he does, then there is a good chance he may have sleep apnea. If he doesn't stop breathing, he likely does not have sleep apnea. If you suspect sleep apnea, he needs a sleep study. Other signs of sleep apnea are having difficulty waking up in the morning (not feeling refreshed from a night's sleep), waking up with a headache, and having trouble staying awake during the day (expecially if he has to be inactive such as sitting in a meeting, reading, watching tv).

      Obstructive sleep apnea has many causes and many treatments. One cause is being over weight. Another is a deviated septum. Another is badly congested sinuses. Another is having too much tissue in the soft palate. CPAP and BiPAP are treatments that can be used for almost any form of obstructive sleep apnea. Weight loss is a treatment for sleep apnea due to being over weight. Seriously congested sinuses are treated either with antibiotics or surgery (depends upon just how bad it is.) Deviated septum is treated with a septoplasty (surgery). Having too much tissue in the soft palate is treated by a UPPP (surgery). A person can have more than one of these conditions at the same time. Only an ENT is qualified to do many of these treatments.

      There is also central sleep apnea. It has to do with the brain forgetting to tell a person to breathe. It can be treated as well.

      If you suspect that your boyfriend has sleep apnea, he needs a special sleep test done.

      If he doesn't have any symptoms of sleep apnea, there are some over the counter remedies to try. If it seems that it his nose is the source is the cause of the problem, there are those little strips you can buy that are supposed to help hold the nose open. There is also a spray for the throat that is supposed to help stop snoring.

      Since he only does it when he sleeps on his back, he may need to sleep on his side. There are pillows that are supposed to help you sleep on your side.

  9. QUESTION:
    Absoulutely petrified about upcoming surgery what do I do?
    Scared, nervous, anxious about an upcoming surgery! How do I get past this without going crazy before this surgery? On Wednesday, I am having a UPPP, Tonsilectomy, Hyoid Suspension and Rhinoplasity all at once. I am scared too death about pain, needles hospital stay. Any advice on getting through this would be much appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      REMEMBER THE GOAL!

      Wow.....that is a lot of surgery. I think anyone would be a bit nervous, and especially if they were not too found of hospitals. That's understandable. It is totally ok to have a bit of anxiety.

      But you have to try and focus on the benefits of all of this work being done on you. Try and imagine how you are going to be after all the healing is done with. I know it is hard to imagine when it will all be over and done with...but if you find your thoughts getting carried away and you start freaking out, then try and make your thoughts switch to when everything will be healed and you won't have these thoughts hanging over you any more. And you will be sleeping so much better.

      I am just assuming that this is for sleep apnea. I imagine that this has been a hard time, and now it all feels like it is coming to the moment where a big change is about to occur. Although this is a big challenge right now, when you next face a big decision in your life you will already be familiar with these emotions, and will be all the better because of it.

      You are a VERY brave person, and you can do this. Remember the goals, remember the benefits, and remember that you are very brave. Keep telling yourself these things over and over, even if you feel a bit shaky. You are brave, it will be SO worth it in the end. You will be stronger, better, and awesome for overcoming this challenge.

      Hang in there : )

  10. QUESTION:
    Can anyone give suggestions on my snoring problem?
    My fiance cannot stand sleeping in the same room with me. Apparently I snore very loudly. We are getting married very soon, so this is a big problem. We will be married and I want to sleep in the same room as her...

    What we have tried:
    Breathe Right strips- work a LITTLE bit, but fall off in the night. No Go!
    Also have a sleep study scheduled with the doctor to see if I have sleep apnea.

    What can we do?!
    I don't think I have sleep apnea, because I can sleep for 8 hours and feel rested. I am somewhat overweight, but I have lost 60 lbs and plan to lose more. The weight loss has not changed it.

    I DID get my nose broken in the 7th grade and I do have a deviated septum ( I think the nose is the problem), but the damn doctor will not refer me to the ENT until after the sleep study.... and my insurance runs out 15 days after the sleep study.. OY!

    • ANSWER:
      There is a long answer to this common question. The severity of your snoring (sleep study will determine this) will dictate how aggressive you should be. Also, if you are overweight by more than 20lbs, weight loss can help. As a general rule, snoring is caused by a few things:

      1) the distance from your tongue to the hyoid bone - meaning that people with short jaws and short necks are likely to snore and have obstructive sleep apnea.

      2) the size of your tonsils (if present) and how low your soft palate and uvula (the punching bag in the back of your throat) hang.

      3) obesity/soft tissue in the neck

      4) ability to breathe through the nose

      5) any intoxicating factors or neurological problems (don't take sedatives or drink alcohol before bed).

      6) large tongue

      What can be done? It is a wide range...but the simplest starting points are weight loss and avoid sleeping supine (flat on your back). Some people tape a tennis ball to the back of the shirt they sleep in to keep them from turning on to their back while sleeping. Some people still snore quite a lot while laying on their side. Although uncomfortable, most people would not snore if they could sleep prone (on their belly).

      Surgery - depends on the cause....for low palate/large tonsils, you can undergo a uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) this is a surgery that removes the tonsils and cuts away part of the soft palate. It can be quite painful, the recovery time is about 3-4 weeks. Works only if you are thin and don't have other causes (see above). Insurance covers this if you have sleep apnea (not just for snoring).

      A more junior procedure just for snoring is called a somnoplasty which involves removing the uvula and applying an electrode to the soft palate (causing some scarring/firming of it). This is not covered by insurance.

      Sliding genioplasty (the jaw is cut and advanced forward) - works for short-jawed thin guys..recovery about 3 weeks. Pain not as bad as UPPP but many times insurance won't cover this.

      Septoplasty - if having trouble breathing through nose...can be combined with sliding genioplasty, somnoplasty or UPPP.

      tongue reduction - not shown to work, very morbid (speech/swallowing problems), I don't recommend this

      dental appliances - may help with mild snoring and even some sleep apnea...most patients stop using this over time ... it's uncomfortable.

      For moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea, patients use Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), a machine that blows air in your face to keep the soft tissues from collapsing while you sleep. It can be difficult to sleep with one of these machines, but many patients can do it. It does help with snoring, but at the price of having a machine (which can be noisy) strapped to your face.

      The last line of treatment for the most severe cases of sleep apnea is the tracheotomy...you probably don't need that.

      Best of luck to you in your new nuptuals...there is a lot of information out there, and these are my opinions on what works (and a few things that don't).

  11. QUESTION:
    More (most) aggressive treatment for sleep apnea?
    I had a UPPP surgery to help with my sleep apnea (CPAP machine-titration 19), it wasn't effective. I would like to know what are other more aggressive options to help regulate my sleep apnea.

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure if they have one in your area, but the "Sleep Wellness Center". I know the guy from the morning show I produce has sleep apnea. He used to fall asleep on air (no joking), and would be drousy during the day. He's been fine ever since they diagnosed it and reccommended he use the machine he currently has... He swears by it.

  12. QUESTION:
    Can someone explain the different stages of sleep apnia and exactly what sleep apnia is?
    Why do you stop breathing?

    • ANSWER:
      Yeah, what that person above me said... PLUS:

      People stop breathing for many different reasons. Sometimes a person just has large tonsils, uvula, an extended palate (roof of the mouth) or the tongue slides down the throat, blocking airflow while you're asleep.

      Its dangerous, because while you're not breathing... your heart kinda panics for lack of oxygen and sometimes increases your blood pressure. When you start breathing again, you can jostle yourself awake, making it impossible to have a good solid nights sleep - which leads to other health and mental problems. Socially, most people with sleep apnea snore like gorillas... making very difficult for loved ones to sleep (and in children, impossible to go to a sleepover).

      "cures" range from things as simple as losing weight (neck circumferance has been linked to disorder), there are pills and sprays, there is a breathing machine which forces air down your throat to keep the airway open... Or you can have surgery... where they remove excess tissue (ie Tonsils, uvula, any unnessicary extension of the palete) (Its called a UPPP if you wanna look that up)

  13. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had the surgery to treat sleep apnea?
    Wether it was due to a deviated septum or collapsed tissue or throat? If so, did your health insurance cover it? Did it work?

    • ANSWER:
      I have had two surgeries to address my sleep apnea.

      1) I saw an oral surgeon in Boston, where I live. She determined that my airway was too narrow (measured front-to-back) in the area behind my tongue. In her opinion this was a bottleneck and was most likely collapsing during episodes of apnea. The surgery I had to correct this was a major surgery called maxillary-mandibular advancement (MMA), in which both the upper and lower jaw are fractured (very carefully, of course) and then moved forward to create more space in the airway.

      My HMO insurance paid for this surgery in full, except for a 0 hospital copay. My doctor had to provide them with copies of my sleep studies, a letter explaining why the surgery was medically necessary, and photos of the plastic models of my jaws (in both the "before" and "after" positions) to demonstrate that the surgery was feasible. I spent 3 days in the hospital recovering, then 6 weeks on a soft-food diet. Had my insurance not covered the operation, I would have had to pay the "list price" of about ,000 (or negotiate with the hospital to bring the price down).

      Unfortunately this first surgery did not cure my apnea, or have any significant effect on it. It's very hard to be sure whether a particular surgery will work, or why it failed. My opinion is that the surgery widened my airway, but there were other "bottlenecks" remaining in my airway that the surgery did not address. So because the other bottlenecks were still there, I still had the apnea.

      2) 18 months later, I saw a different oral surgeon who told me that the MMA was definitely the right thing to do, but he questioned whether the first surgeon had moved my jaws forward enough. He thought that if he had done it, he would have been able to create a bit more room. (Of course, all surgeons think they are the best.) The procedure that he recommended was a tonsillectomy and a pharyngoplasty. A tonsillectomy is simple - that is the removal of the tonsils. My tonsils weren't that big, but since I had a narrow airway the surgeon figured anything that was taking up unnecessary space back there should be removed.

      A pharyngoplasty is an operation that reconstructs or modifies the pharynx - specifically, the soft palate. I had a large soft palate that was loose and droopy. It hung down into my throat and, in the opinion of the surgeon, was probably a source of obstruction when I breathed at night. Some surgeons perform a procedure called a Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP). This is a fancy way of saying that they operate on the soft palate, including the uvula (they usually remove most or all of the uvula). My surgeon is one of the very few that doesn't believe in removing the uvula. I like his approach, which is why I went out of my way to have the surgery done by him.

      Unfortunately he is in California, and my health insurance would not pay for the full cost of the surgery because he was not in their "network" of providers. I wanted to know exactly how much I would have to pay for the surgeon, the hospital fees, and the anesthesiologist fees (they all send separate bills!) I had to call each of their offices and talk to their billing staff. Then I had to talk to my insurance to see what portion they would cover. It took me a few weeks of inquiring, but eventually I got a good estimate. I think in the end I ended up paying about 00 to 00 out-of-pocket for the surgery. This time, my sleep did improve after this surgery. I still have sleep apnea and I still use a CPAP machine, but I am less reliant on the CPAP and I can use it at a lower pressure setting, which is more comfortable.

      Neither of these surgeries is something to be taken likely. I was about 30-years-old when I had them, which was great because generally the younger you are, the less chance of complication. Any surgery has a risk of complications, failure, etc. I am willing to take risks and make sacrifices to improve my apnea, whereas other people might not be willing to take such risks. It's a very personal choice. Of course I'm a bit disappointed that my apnea wasn't completely cured, but I think it was still worth it.

      If you want to hear more stories, click the below link to the Sleep Surgery Support Society, and then check out the many links on that site.

  14. QUESTION:
    How can I fall asleep easier?
    I always feel really really tired in the morning and it affects my work. How can I fix that?

    • ANSWER:
      Could be that you have sleep apnea. When you stop breathing at night (apnea) your brain will make your body wake up just enough to restart your breathing. If this pushes you back into stage one sleep then that would account for you being so tired when you wake up, even if you have had a full night of sleep. There are a few treatments out there, surgical and otherwise. The three most popular:

      -CPAP machine (you wear it night, kind of like an oxygen mask but a little different)

      -UPPP (don't ask me what that stands for. it's a long word that you would have to go to school for many years to learn how to pronounce. but it's a surgery where they remove part of the upper part of your uvula so it doesn't obstruct your thoat at night.)

      -Oral Appliance (you wear the device at night and it pushes your jaw foward in hope of helping to keep your throat open. It is kind of like a retainer. this one is probably the least expensive)

      Then again, you may not have apnea. It could be Idiopathic Hypersomnia, or narcoplepsy. (That doesn't always mean you fall asleep standing up. There are different grades of narcolepsy. Most of the time it just means that you are SUPER tired during the day. In which case you just need medication)

      Hope all this helps.

  15. QUESTION:
    can I overcome the use of a cpap machine. Ive been diagnosed with sleep apnea.?
    Its seems as though there are ways to deal with the situation than there is to treat the condition. I want to overcome the use of the cpap machine and overcome the diagnosis of having sleep apnea. I am slightly overweight. I don't know if me losing weight will help any.

    • ANSWER:
      CPAP is the least invasive way to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Other options are a UPPP procedure that involves having the uvula and tonsils surgically removed, weight loss, and/or a dental device that would help keep the tongue out of the airway.

      The UPPP surgery has been described by one of instructors who had it as 'swallowing razor blades for six months'. I don't think that's a recommendation. He said that he lost a lot of weight because he could only eat ice chips for a long time. He ended-up back on a CPAP machine anyways. The UPPP has a success rate of like 25%.

      Weight loss may or may not help your OSA. If anything, it won't make it worse. Some people who are at their perfect weight have OSA.

      I recommend that you accept the OSA and use your machine as prescribed by your doctor. Your quality and length of life will likely be much better. A diagnosis of OSA should only be made after a sleep study confirms it. If that has been done, then you very likely do have OSA.

  16. QUESTION:
    Can I PLEASE have some advice about sleep apnea surgery
    I have obstructive sleep apnea. I had a sleep study done. I got a CPAP machine but I can't sleep with it on. It's very uncomfortable and I cannot fall asleep with it on. I'm scheduled for a tonsillectomy and UPPP in 9 weeks.

    Everything I read online says don't do the UPPP. Everyone on Yahoo Answers says don't do the UPPP. Now, obviously the CPAP is not an option. I simply cannot tolerate it. The surgery is my next step.

    My tonsils have always been enlarged. Should I have just the tonsils out first and see if that works before I go ahead and do everything? I'm worried that the UPPP might change the way I talk. I don't know what to do. All I know is that I need surgery because I can't use the CPAP and I can't go on like this anymore.

    • ANSWER:
      I couldn't sleep with my CPAP either. It took an entire year to finally figure out what mask I could wear. I wear the nasal pillows, not that horrid big thing over my face. It is SO much better. I had the surgery to fix a deviated septum and trim the turbinates. It wasn't too bad. I was too nervous about the other surgeries so I didn't do them. The CPAP took me from 45 apneas per hour to only 3. My suggestion is to FORCE yourself to use the CPAP, trying all the different things. I even had to use a chin brace because my mouth would hang open, blocking the CPAP from working. But eventually I was able to learn to keep my mouth shut. lol

      The CPAP is ESSENTIAL. If you have to, take a sleeping pill at night or a relaxation pill (if your doctor agrees) and learn to get used to the CPAP. I sleep like a baby with mine on now and love the deep breathing I get with it. It just takes a LOT of time and adjusting to get used to it. Good luck.

  17. QUESTION:
    does anyone know if a person doesn't get there tonsils out in adolescence can it cause sleep apnea?
    I have noticed that when he has an earache he has more problems with the sleep apnia..Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Having the tonsils and adenoids removed as a child is the common treatment (cure) for sleep apnea in children. It does not however mean that sleep apnea will not return as an adult then requiring cpap or so on as treatment. Having large tonsils as an adult may make sleep apnea worsen but it will not be cured with their removal as with children. It may lessen but will not cure as with any surgery such as UPPP, does not cure sleep apnea unless they have a very mild case. Only cpap, bipap and ASV are proven effective treatments in adults.

  18. QUESTION:
    Why do people snore when they sleep ? What is the psychological and biological reason behind it ??

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Snoring:
      --------------------------
      The noisy sounds of snoring occur when there is an obstruction to the free flow of air through the passages at the back of the mouth and nose. This area is the collapsible part of the airway (see illustration) where the tongue and upper throat meet the soft palate and uvula. Snoring occurs when these structures strike each other and vibrate during breathing.
      --------------------------------------------------------------------
      People who snore may suffer from:

      Poor muscle tone in the tongue and throat. When muscles are too relaxed, either from alcohol or drugs that cause sleepiness, the tongue falls backwards into the airway or the throat muscles draw in from the sides into the airway. This can also happen during deep sleep.

      Excessive bulkiness of throat tissue. Children with large tonsils and adenoids often snore. Overweight people have bulky neck tissue, too. Cysts or tumors can also cause bulk, but they are rare.

      Long soft palate and/or uvula. A long palate narrows the opening from the nose into the throat. As it dangles, it acts as a noisy flutter valve during relaxed breathing. A long uvula makes matters even worse.

      Obstructed nasal airways. A stuffy or blocked nose requires extra effort to pull air through it. This creates an exaggerated vacuum in the throat, and pulls together the floppy tissues of the throat, and snoring results. So, snoring often occurs only during the hay fever season or with a cold or sinus infection.

      Also, deformities of the nose or nasal septum, such as a deviated septum (a deformity of the wall that separates one nostril from the other) can cause such an obstruction.

      Snoring is it bad:
      -----------------------
      Socially, yes! It can be, when it makes the snorer an object of ridicule and causes others sleepless nights and resentfulness.

      Medically, yes! It disturbs sleeping patterns and deprives the snorer of appropriate rest. When snoring is severe, it can cause serious, long-term health problems, including obstructive sleep apnea.

      Is cure available :
      ------------------------

      Self Help

      Adopt a healthy and athletic lifestyle to develop good muscle tone and lose weight.
      Avoid alchohal before sleep
      Regular sleeping patterns
      Sleep on your side rather than your back
      Tilt the head of your bed upwards four inches.

      Cures:

      Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) is surgery for treating obstructive sleep apnea.
      Thermal Ablation Palatoplasty (TAP)
      Genioglossus and hyod advancement is a surgical procedure.

      --------------------------------------
      Should you worry if you snore:

      Ask your partner or others who sleep near you. If it disturbs them, please cure it.

      45% percent of normal adults snore at least occasionally, and 25 percent are habitual snorers. Problem snoring is more frequent in males and overweight persons, and it usually grows worse with age.

  19. QUESTION:
    what causes people to snore when they are sleeping and is there a way a person can stop snoring?

    • ANSWER:
      The noisy sounds of snoring occur when there is an obstruction to the free flow of air through the passages at the back of the mouth and nose. This area is the collapsible part of the airway where the tongue and upper throat meet the soft palate and uvula. Snoring occurs when these structures strike each other and vibrate during breathing.

      People who snore may suffer from:

      Poor muscle tone in the tongue and throat. When muscles are too relaxed, either from alcohol or drugs that cause sleepiness, the tongue falls backwards into the airway or the throat muscles draw in from the sides into the airway. This can also happen during deep sleep.
      Excessive bulkiness of throat tissue. Children with large tonsils and adenoids often snore. Overweight people have bulky neck tissue, too. Cysts or tumors can also cause bulk, but they are rare.
      Long soft palate and/or uvula. A long palate narrows the opening from the nose into the throat. As it dangles, it acts as a noisy flutter valve during relaxed breathing. A long uvula makes matters even worse.
      Obstructed nasal airways. A stuffy or blocked nose requires extra effort to pull air through it. This creates an exaggerated vacuum in the throat, and pulls together the floppy tissues of the throat, and snoring results. So, snoring often occurs only during the hay fever season or with a cold or sinus infection.

      Adults who suffer from snoring should try the following self-help remedies:

      Adopt a healthy and athletic lifestyle to develop good muscle tone and lose weight.
      Avoid tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and antihistamines before bedtime.
      Avoid alcohol for at least four hours and heavy meals or snacks for three hours before retiring.
      Establish regular sleeping patterns
      Sleep on your side rather than your back.
      Tilt the head of your bed upwards four inches.
      Remember, snoring means obstructed breathing, and obstruction can be serious. It's not funny, and not hopeless.

      (EXTREME CASES)
      Snoring or obstructive sleep apnea may respond to various treatments now offered by many otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeons:

      Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) is surgery for treating obstructive sleep apnea. It tightens flabby tissues in the throat and palate, and expands air passages.
      Thermal Ablation Palatoplasty (TAP) refers to procedures and techniques that treat snoring and some of them also are used to treat various severities of obstructive sleep apnea. Different types of TAP include bipolar cautery, laser, and radiofrequency. Laser Assisted Uvula Palatoplasty (LAUP) treats snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnea by removing the obstruction in the airway. A laser is used to vaporize the uvula and a specified portion of the palate in a series of small procedures in a doctor's office under local anesthesia. Radiofrequency ablation some with temperature control approved by the FDA utilizes a needle electrode to emit energy to shrink excess tissue to the upper airway including the palate and uvula (for snoring), base of the tongue (for obstructive sleep apnea), and nasal turbinates (for chronic nasal obstruction).
      Genioglossus and hyod advancement is a surgical procedure for the treatment of sleep apnea. It prevents collapse of the lower throat and pulls the tongue muscles forward, thereby opening the obstructed airway.

  20. QUESTION:
    Has anyone had surgery for sleep apnea?
    What do they do?? Is it successful? Do they take the tonsils out also?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello !

      I also have sleep apnea, but I don't want to have a surgery to treat it, only if my disorder is very serious. I have mild sleep apnea.

      Here are the types of surgery for sleep apnea known today:

      - UPPP, or Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty. The surgeon cuts away the uvula and part of the soft tissue at the back of the throat. This may change or reduce loud snoring. The problem is that people with severe apnea are not good candidates for UPPP.

      -Lase surgery. This procedure can be done in the doctor's office but takes between one and seven visits to complete.

      -Gastric Bypass Surgery for overweight people. Click http://www.sleep-apnea-guide.com to learn more.

      -Tracheostomy is the last option in sleep apnea surgery. If all of other treatments fail, this simple surgery can eliminate sleep apnea.

      I hope it helps.

  21. QUESTION:
    Throat Surgery for Sleep Apnea (UPPP)?
    I have been diagnosed with fairly bad sleep apnea. I stop breathing several times a night (I average 8 times an hour that I have a breathing issue) and my O2 levels drop to the mid 70s (which is very low). As a result I am having UPPP (Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty) in the spring, which is surgery to trim my soft palate and uvula, and at this time they'll remove my tonsils and the remains of my adenoids (I had them removed when I was six, but they grew back partially).

    What are some side effects of this surgery? I've heard that it'll screw up my voice--will it make it higher pitched or lower?
    (Yes I know, ask the doctor about the side effects, I already have. I was wondering about people who have had the surgery).

    • ANSWER:
      Go for a second opinion. A UPPP has limited success rate. Taking out your tonsil and adenoids as an adult is painful. The surgery only works if this is the area of obstruction. Doctors are not good at picking out where the site of the obstruction is. You have already had your TAs grow back. Your uvula will as well. Scar tissue is horrible. The only surgery that is 100 percent effective is a tracheotomy.

      CPAP and or a dental device is a far better option

      Make sure your sleep specialist is board certified in sleep. suggests a pulmonologist or a neurologist not and ENT.(only my opinion) I think surgery is a radical move when it has limited success and CPAP works. surgeon only makes money if he does surgery.

      My uncle had the surgery. He sleep apnea is worse than ever. I use xpap route and feel way better than he does.

  22. QUESTION:
    UPPP Surgery for Sleep Apnea?
    Has anyone ever had UPPP surgery for sleep apnea and if so did it work to stop sleep apnea and snoring?

    • ANSWER:
      This is rarely even an option anymore because its surgery and the odds of it working are so slim. Its usually the tounge causing the sleep apnea, unless its central sleep apnea and that originates in the brain, so uness you remove the tounge or brain you won't really fix it without CPAP or BiPAP.

  23. QUESTION:
    Tonsillectomy to cure sleep apnea
    I have enlarged tonsils and when I look at my throat in the mirror I can see how the tonsils and uvula come together to create a blockage when I simulate snoring. I am scheduled for a tonsillectomy and UPPP in 8 weeks. Would this likely fix (or at least greatly improve) my sleep apnea since my tonsils are enlarged?

    • ANSWER:

  24. QUESTION:
    About a surgery for Sleep Apnea.?
    I have sleep Apnea and my doctor recommended getting a surgery to basically hollow out my throat so i can breathe at night. the surgery is abbreviated UPPP. My friend, whos parents are doctors, does not think i shound get it because of risks and the fact i wld have to re-learn to swallow and that my voice may change? Is any of this reasonable? I dont want to be dependednt on a oxygen machine my whole life.
    im not over weight, im 18 and pretty healthy. I am always tired though, hence my desire to get this fixed. the CPAP just seems like something that would wiegh me down at college next year. My doctor told me surgery would be good for someone my age. but im still nervous. I would also be getting a deviated septum fixed while I am at it to help with the breathing...

    • ANSWER:
      being a respiratory therapist and a patient with sleep apnea. I have looked at all of the options and research. Surgery is really a last resort. It is only 50 percent at best. Surgery only works if they know exactly where the obstruction is. My uncle had the surgery you are considering sure it help for a while but the scar tissue has made his sleep apnea worse than ever and he was a lot older than you when he had it. A cpap machine weighs only a couple of pounds and sits on a night stand. No big deal.

      Another option is a dental device. I have a friend who absolutely could not do cpap. The dental device works for him.

      Whatever you do, you need to be complaint with treatment if you want to make it through college. Untreated OSA has the effect of fatigue, headaches and depression. This is certainly not condusive to learning. Although I had a degree, it was not until I was treated that I could go back to school and get a second and third degree.

      Visit the sleepnet.com website for a ton of infomation and people who have done all of the treatments options.

  25. QUESTION:
    is there any over the counter remedies for sleep apnea?? ;?
    My husband going to see the dr later this month
    I just can't deal with the freight train snoring and waking me up. He does sleep in the other room sometimes; I can't because I also have sleep apnea thus the machine would be hard to move.
    anyway just wondering.
    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      nope

      Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) is a common procedure which broadens the airway by removing the surplus tissue such as tonsils, adenoids, uvula etc.

      Laser-assisted Uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP) is opted to either remove a part of the soft palate, shorten the uvula or any other extra tissue in the pharynx, which may cause obstruction.

      Tracheostomy is a method to make an opening in the trachea, which is also known as the windpipe. A tube is inserted through the opening and is opened only while sleeping so as to facilitate direct passage of air to the lungs.

      http://sleep-apnea-info.blogspot.com/2006/09/tretamnets-for-sleep-apnea.html

  26. QUESTION:
    sleep apnea......any natural treatments besides the machine?
    Was wondering if there might be some natural treatment for sleep apnea with out having to use the machine that you wear a mask all night and it puts greater inward pressure of air so you lungs fully fill up with air. My mother uses the machine and she wants me to be tested for apnea because of some symptoms I have but I doubt I could get used to wearing something all night. any suggestions.

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep apnea is a condition characterized by episodes of stopped breathing during sleep.

      Symptoms
      It is important to emphasize that often, the person who has obstructive sleep apnea does not remember the episodes of apnea during the night. The predominant symptoms are usually associated with excessive daytime sleepiness due to poor sleep during the night. Often, family members, especially spouses, witness the periods of apnea. Symptoms that may be observed include:

      * Loud snoring
      * Periods of not breathing (apnea)
      * Awakening not rested in the morning
      * Abnormal daytime sleepiness, including falling asleep at inappropriate times
      * Morning headaches
      * Recent weight gain
      * Limited attention
      * Memory loss
      * Poor judgment
      * Personality changes
      * Lethargy

      Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:

      * Hyperactive behavior, especially in children
      * High blood pressure
      * Automatic behavior (performing actions by rote)
      * Leg swelling (if severe)

      Weight management (or intentional weight loss) and avoiding alcohol and sedatives at bedtime may relieve sleep apnea in some individuals. If these measures are unsuccessful in stopping sleep apnea, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a form of mechanical breathing assistance that involves the use of a specially-designed mask worn over the nose or nose and mouth at night, may be prescribed.

      Mechanical devices inserted into the mouth at night to keep the jaw forward may be useful in mild to moderate cases.

      Surgery to remove excess tissue at the back of the throat (called a uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or UPPP), to remove enlarged tonsils or adenoids (see tonsillectomy), or to create an opening in the trachea to bypass the obstructed airway during sleep (tracheostomy), may be helpful if anatomical causes are present. In some people, surgery to remove blockage of the nose or upper throat may relieve sleep apnea.

      Removing enlarged tonsils or adenoids may be all that is necessary in children to cure obstructive sleep apnea.

  27. QUESTION:
    Sleep Apnea Question- Help?
    I had surgery to treat my sleep apnea. I had what s called a base tongue reduction or midline glossectomy. It s been 7 weeks since the surgery and I am wondering when should I feel better. I still feel tired during the day and get up at night 5-8 times. I have been remembering my dreams since the surgery and I tend to wake up during dreaming. I am not really fat or anything, so I had to do surgery to help me. How long does it take for this surgery to work and also what are some signs that this surgery has worked on me? I also had the UPPP which helped reduce my apnea by 50%, so I was hoping this surgery would take care of it. I been feeling so down because of this, please think I am lazy or something, I feel like I have no motivation anymore in life. I just want to get better and resume my life and stop being some damn tired all day and can t learn or anything.

    • ANSWER:
      Please consult a pulmonologist. I think he will recommend to go for another sleep study to know your current status. BTW, stress is a big reason and you certainly look like under stress. Please work on reducing your stress as well. You can also ask experts at healthmantraindia.com
      Hope you feel better soon.

  28. QUESTION:
    Sleep Apnea and nightmares........?
    I've been having horrible, horrible dreams for the last few years.

    During the same period i've apparently developed sleep apnea.

    Is there a connection between having difficulty breathing and nightmares?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes they are related to each other. Sleep apnea can be treated easily. There are two lines of treatment:

      Non-surgical treatment:
      1. Lose weight
      2. Avoid alcohols and sedatives
      3. Avoid lying supine
      4. Continous positive airway pressure: the patient will wear a mask connected to a pump that will blow air at a higher pressure to prevent the collapse of the airway

      Surgical treatment:
      Aims at removing the cause of obstruction. If the cause is tonsils and adenoids, then an adenotonsillectomy is done.
      An important operation is being done in many patients nowadays which is called Uvulo-Palato-Pharyngoplasty (UPPP). Done by laser involves removal of the tonsils, trimming of the pillars, removing the uvula and a part of the soft palate, therefore creating a wider airway passage.

  29. QUESTION:
    has anyone had a UPPP procedure for sleep apnea?
    Did it work? Did you have complications afterwards? What can you not do any longer? for example: drink out of a straw..

    • ANSWER:

  30. QUESTION:
    How fast will I feel the benefits of surgery for sleep apnea?
    I am scheduled for a tonsillectomy and UPPP in 10 weeks. I have had super-large tonsils my whole life. I've already tried the CPAP/BIPAP and it doesn't work for me. I can't sleep with it on.

    Now, I've been reading about the success rates of this surgery for sleep apnea. Some people say the success rates are low, and some say it's a 50/50 shot. I'm willing to take the risk and go through with it.

    Now, ASSUMING THAT this surgery does correct my sleep apnea, how fast will I begin sleeping better? Will I experience better sleep almost immediately (after the pain of the surgery subsides)? Or is this a process that takes several months?

    I'd like to hear from someone who has had success with sleep apnea surgery.

    • ANSWER:

  31. QUESTION:
    Cures for Sleep Apnea?
    A friend of mine has suffered for years with sleep apnea. He has followed all the medical advice for solving the problem.
    From loosing weight to using c-pap etc.

    Are there any other ideas anyone has that has worked for them that I can pass on to him.
    ???

    Please help!
    My friend is down to under 150 lbs. So there is no obesity issue for him.

    Also he is very current on doctor visits due to other health related issues. Therefore, further doctor visits will not help.

    He is/was just wanting to hear about other methods that helped others in his situation with sleep apnea.

    • ANSWER:
      CPAP should be the most effective treatment for sleep apnea, but many patients can't tolerate the CPAP therapy because they don't know how to choose the best mask for their face. This is the key to a good treatment with CPAP.

      Dental devices can help many patients with sleep apnea, as long as they have a large tongue or large adenoids and tonsils.

      Surgery is another option: tonsillectomy is for large tonsils, UPPP is for large uvula, bariatric surgery is for obesity.

      Before choosing these treatments, your friends need to speak with his doctor.

      For patients with mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea, positional therapy can be very helpful. Here is a good site where you can learn more about:

  32. QUESTION:
    HELP - What is the best surgery for sleep apnea?
    I am scheduled for a UPPP in six weeks and am worried that it might not be the best option. I have already tried the CPAP and I can't sleep with it on. I have another appointment scheduled with my ENT to discuss all the options.

    Here's the deal: My tonsils are enlarged and have been since childhood. As far back as I can remember I have always had trouble with waking during the night. I am not overweight (and certainly not obese). Would a tonsillectomy alone likely fix the problem? Or should some of the soft palate be removed as well? The problem is that a UPPP is very invasive, statistically has a low success rate over the long term, and sometimes has bizarre side effects.

    Can anyone who has had sleep apnea surgery give me some pointers?

    • ANSWER:
      My husband just had this surgery, the UPPP. It was horribly painful, but very effective. He too had used a CPAP with little success. This surgery was immensely helpful with his snoring, and waking. The recovery was pretty brutal, liquids and frozen things for the first couple of days at least. He still, 3 months later, has some episodes of things coming out of his nose, but we just laugh at him. After 2 weeks he said he wouldn't do it again. 3 months later, he can't believe he waited so long to do it. I guess it just depends on your pain threshold and how desperate you are to remedy the situation.

  33. QUESTION:
    How does Snoring & Sleep Apnea Eze work?
    I'm worried about my father. He wants to drop however much money it will take in order not to wear a CPAP. Does anyone have a link that will help me understand how this can help a person with sleep apnea? As far as I know, sleep apnea is caused by the fat on a persons neck pushing down on some flap, closing the airway in the throat (or something like that). How the heck can someone take a pill that helps with the apnea? I searched for it online, all I got were testimonials. That's not good enough. My father found the ad in a newspaper, and to me, it doesn't seem good for him. It seems too good to be true. I don't want him to spend a month for a pill that does nothing. Thanks ahead of time!

    • ANSWER:
      there is no way that a pill will fix sleep apnea so tell him to nix that idea. there are a couple of ways to try and get around a cpap. the first is to lose weight. not all people with OSA are fat but most of the time there is a weight issue. the second alternative is surgical, not fun at all, and isn't 100% effective all the time. it's called a UPPP. uvulopalatopharyngoplasty. basically they cut out the uvula and a great portion of the back of the throat and upper palate of the mouth thus removing the occlusive tissue. like i said, doesn't always work though. talk to your doctor.

  34. QUESTION:
    do i have sleep apnea?
    my parents said that when i was little i would gag trying to grasp for air, and then i would get it but then it would happen again, don't if in the same hour. now i don't know if i have it because i can't tell, i'm asleep, how can i tell on my own if i have sleep apnea. and how can i tell if its mild, modedrate or severe? help please. and if i do have it what kind central or the other one.

    • ANSWER:
      The only way to tell for sure is to have someone in attendance while you are sleeping. If you stop breathing for some seconds, and then resume with a gasp, you've got it. There are two common ways of dealing with it:
      - A CPAP machine. This is an air pump that pushes air into a face mask that you wear while sleeping.
      - Surgery. An operation called a UPPP removes some tissue from the throat to improve the airway. It is unpleasant and painful, but can cure the problem once and for all.

  35. QUESTION:
    Please help.. I think I have sleep apnea?
    Well first of all, my exboyfriend told me I use to occasionally stop breathing during my sleep. and when I asked my current boyfriend he answered YES! right away, which wasn't what I was expecting. so anyways..

    I don't know if I do it, or they are just lying, or think they know what they are talking about when really they don't.
    I've been looking up things about medical marijuana and what is helps and sleep apnea was one of them, and I didn't know what it was so i clicked on the link not knowing that it was something I might have, reading about it I've realized I have been having crazy mood swings and I get irritated VERY easily. if my mom says hi to me the wrong way ( I don't seem to know what the wrong way is, but her even talking to me sometimes..) makes me very very irritated and I will flip out at her, even though i know I shouldn't. I can't really help it I don't know why, I am just always really frustrated at everything and don't know why..

    I woke up a couple days ago at 4 in the morning with horrible feelings
    nothing was wrong, not the flu or a cold or anything, no pains.. but my body woke itself up during my sleep, and I could just feel that something was wrong,
    nothing hurt but I started crying because of the 'something horribly wrong' feeling in my body.. I could barely get enough air into me at a time, constantly breathing really really deep because it felt like I wasn't getting enough oxygen with every breath..

    so pretty much felt like i was going to die or something though there was no pains and with nothing wrong, as if i just was going to pass out and .... pass out.

    oh yeah and I have insomnia. so. if that has anything to do with it?
    I HAVE NO IDEA so.
    yeah please help thanks.

    is sleep apnea a possibility?
    what do i do to make sure that's what it is?
    what can i do to help it and stop it?

    • ANSWER:
      The reason you woke up feeling like this is because your body IS SLOWLY DYING. Sleep apnea will eventually kill you if you don't treat it. It's isn't like a stroke or heart attack that can kill you immediately. It slowly hurts you and takes a little of your life, one night at a time. Because you are not breathing and getting enough oxygen, it starts to stress your heart and lungs to work harder and harder to try and compensate. Over time, this stress puts you at higher risk for heart disease and eventual heart failure.

      You have now heard from two different people who have watched/listened to you sleep and told you that you stop breathing. That is the primary symptom of obstructive sleep apnea. You need to contact your doctor immediately to set up a sleep study. Don't wait for a few days to find a convenient time. Each day you delay, you kill yourself a little more.

      I have had sleep apnea for years. I was finally tested and mine was really severe at 116 sleep disturbances in an hour. I could not tolerate the cpap machine even though I tried different masks and different methods. My personality began to change over time. I became angry and hateful all the time for no reason and always had a short temper. I guess not having restful sleep for months does that to you. There would be no difference between sleeping 2 hours and 10 hours, there was no rest. I couldn't focus at work and would fall asleep while driving to and from work.

      Friends and coworkers said I should take sleeping pills and stuff to help. I tried to make them understand it wasn't an issue of falling asleep. It was an issue that there is a physical defect in my body that suffocates me when I go to sleep. Nothing can be done to fix it without surgery. (I just had surgery (UPPP) and it was the best decision I ever made). You can't do anything to stop it yourself. All of these gimmicks about exercises and stuff are worthless. You can't fix this yourself. You must see your doctor for a sleep study. No medicine, legal or not, can help you.

      When you get the sleep apnea under control, the difference in you will be so profound that you will feel like a different person. While waiting for your sleep study, sleep on your side. It won't correct the apnea, but it will lessen it somewhat in most cases and help you feel a little better until you can talk to the doctor.

  36. QUESTION:
    Is it illegal to drive when you have sleep apnea?
    I just had a sleep study done last night. When the nurse wolk me up this morning at 6:00 A.M. she said that she did not see any sleep apnea when I was asleep until 2:00 A.M. She said from two until six in the morning they let the computer analyz the rest of my sleep. So I left the hospital not worried. This afternoon I called my doctor to schedule a follow up for monday. She said I am glad you called because I got the first two pages of you test results back and it says it is illegal for you to drive without treatment for sleep apnea. My question is has anybody ever heard that it is illegal to drive with sleep apnea? Also dose anyone know what the treatment is for sleep apnea? please help

    • ANSWER:
      Whether or not it is illegal to drive if you've been diagnosed with sleep apnea is different from jurisdiction to jurisdiction -- call you local Department of Motor Vehicles to find out. You'll also need to find out when the restrictions can be lifted, because sleep apnea is treatable. Usually, in jurisdictions in which untreated sleep apnea can cause you to lose your license, a doctor's diagnosis showing successful treatment of your sleep apnea should restore normal driving privileges. Again, check with your local DMV.

      There are several treatments for sleep apnea, depending on how badly it is affecting you, and several other factors. If it is mild, you can try home remedies: don't sleep on your back; try sleeping on your side, lose weight, cut back on the use of sleeping pills, etc.

      For more severe cases (which it sounds like you have), there are several options. You can use a CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machine. A CPAP is a machine which requires you to wear a mask over your nose and mouth while you sleep (akin to a fighter pilot's mask). The CPAP then delivers a constant air pressure to your nose, helping to keep your airway open. There are also several surgeries available to treat sleep apnea:

      * Somnoplasty: A minimally invasive procedure to reduce the soft tissue in the upper airway.
      * Nasal surgery: Correction of nasal obstructions such as a deviated septum.
      * Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP): A procedure that removes soft tissue on the back of the throat and palate, increasing the width of the airway at the throat opening.
      * Mandibular maxillar advancement surgery: Invasive surgery to correct certain facial abnormalities or throat obstructions that contribute to sleep apnea.

      Which treatment is right for you is a decision to be made between you and your doctor.

      Good luck!

  37. QUESTION:
    Diagnosed with sleep apnea; any other options other than C-Pap?

    • ANSWER:
      The availability of other options depends on the severity of your apnea. Mandibular advancing devices (mouth pieces which move the jaw forward, opening the airway) can be effective for people with mild apnea. Similarly, some various surgeries are available, but they tend to be most effective in people who have airway abnormalities causing their apnea (i.e., not likely to be effective if you are overweight and this is the main cause of your apnea). I'll be perfectly honest, I've run repeat sleep studies on dozens of patients who have had surgery to "cure" their apnea, and I've seen it be effective for exactly one of them. The recovery from ENT surgery, particularly the UPPP (uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, or surgical reconstruction of the upper airway) is a pretty nasty one, too. All of the other remedies other people have mentioned (digeridoo, etc.) haven't been proven effective yet, but that doesn't mean they don't work. Again, they're more likely to work for people with primary snoring or mild apnea. CPAP is by far the most effective treatment available, but if it's something you absolutely can't do, talk to your doctor about other options. Part of what I do for my job is to meet with patients during the day and "desensitize" them to CPAP. Sometimes just taking your time and getting used to the air pressure little by little can go a long way in making you comfortable with CPAP. It usually takes 2-3 weeks before you get used to it, but by then most people are feeling so much better throughout the day that it becomes worth it to wear CPAP at night. The bottom line, however, is that getting your apnea treated is vital to your cardiovascular health and quality of life overall, so even a less effective treatment like a dental device or surgery is better than ignoring the disease altogether. Talk to your doctor.

  38. QUESTION:
    Sleep apnoea?helpful ideas?
    my father has been diagnosed with servere sleep apnea, hes 41 and quite large. he uses a cpap machine and aslo oxygen machine when sleeping hes been using it for about a year now and no change. hes allways saying about a "dizzy" head and yawning consistantly. hes a plumber so hes job is quite physical by the time he gets home he falls asleep,then eats dinner and goes to bed,does anyone have any thoughts/ideas at all that may help??thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep apnea is the term used for periods in which a person temporarily stops breathing while asleep.

      Weight management can prevent some cases of obstructive sleep apnea. It may be helpful for people with narrow breathing passages to have their tonsils and adenoids removed. Some cases of central sleep apnea can be prevented by preventing the associated condition, such as stroke.

      Treatment is focused on reducing airway blockage and increasing the amount of oxygen in the body. The first step is often a serious attempt at losing weight. It is also crucial to avoid alcohol and sleeping pills. If these measures do not help, the person may need a continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, machine. The individual wears a mask over the nostrils or mouth that pumps in pressurized air. This increases the amount of oxygen entering the lungs. It also relieves the symptoms of obstruction. The technique can be used with or without supplemental oxygen. Dental appliances may be used to reposition the tongue and lower jaw. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, or UPPP, is a type of surgery that removes excess tissue at the back of the throat. If all other methods fail, a tracheostomy may be done. This involves cutting a small hole in the neck through which the person can breathe. Medicines may be needed to increase respiratory function while the person sleeps. Antidepressants may be prescribed. These reduce the amount of time a person spends in deep sleep.

      Good luck

  39. QUESTION:
    Surgery didn't save me. I need some advice, please!?
    I had a UPPP (ear,nose, and throat sugery) recently to relieve my severe sleep apnea. Ever since I healed from the surgery, when I sneeze, I blow big/solid chunks of mucus from my nose. I also produce large amounts of phlegm in my throat area.

    Is this normal? The phlegm is not such a problem; the mucus, however, is extremely gross and embarassing.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Mr Landlord

      The body gives us signals to let us know we have toxins in the blood. Skin conditions, mucus, and pain are the 3. This indicates you need to cleanse out the poisons and waste in the body. Doing a colon and liver cleanse would benefit your health tremedously.
      Also, are you drinking a gallon of water like I do everyday. This also helps push out the toxins.

      "The body knows how to heal itself, it just needs some assistance".

      Best of health to you

  40. QUESTION:
    Any home remedy for sleep apnea?

    I am a 37 male, 290 lbs, snorer.
    sorry, I meant 190 lbs.

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep apnea is very dangerous, it can cause serious heart problems along with a host of other problems. I am not sure in which order you would go in but from my experience, I was told by my family that I snore too loud and I kept waking up choking. I saw my family doc and she ordered a sleep study. That next week I found out that I had Obstructive Sleep Apnea and that I need to see an ENT doc (ear, nose, & throat). He told me that the cause of my sleep apnea was an enlarged uvula with is the little punching bag in the back of my throat. My options were to have a CPAP machine and if I could not tolerate that, then I would have a UPPP. Some people have a large tongue and they need to have some of it shaved off and others may need their tonsils taken out. It all depends on the person, but my advice to you would be to go see the doc asap because it just gets worse over time. Good Luck!

  41. QUESTION:
    anyone got a good solution for heavy snoring?

    • ANSWER:
      Adults who suffer from mild or occasional snoring should try the following self-help remedies:

      Adopt a healthy and athletic lifestyle to develop good muscle tone and lose weight.
      Avoid tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and antihistamines before bedtime.
      Avoid alcohol for at least four hours and heavy meals or snacks for three hours before retiring.
      Establish regular sleeping patterns
      Sleep on your side rather than your back.
      Tilt the head of your bed upwards four inches.
      Remember, snoring means obstructed breathing, and obstruction can be serious. It's not funny, and not hopeless

      Heavy Snoring Treatment
      Treatment depends on the diagnosis. An examination will reveal if the snoring is caused by nasal allergy, infection, deformity, or tonsils and adenoids.
      Snoring or obstructive sleep apnea may respond to various treatments now offered by many otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeons:
      Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) is surgery for treating obstructive sleep apnea. It tightens flabby tissues in the throat and palate, and expands air passages.
      Thermal Ablation Palatoplasty (TAP) refers to procedures and techniques that treat snoring and some of them also are used to treat various severities of obstructive sleep apnea. Different types of TAP include bipolar cautery, laser, and radiofrequency. Laser Assisted Uvula Palatoplasty (LAUP) treats snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnea by removing the obstruction in the airway. A laser is used to vaporize the uvula and a specified portion of the palate in a series of small procedures in a doctor's office under local anesthesia. Radiofrequency ablation some with temperature control approved by the FDA utilizes a needle electrode to emit energy to shrink excess tissue to the upper airway including the palate and uvula (for snoring), base of the tongue (for obstructive sleep apnea), and nasal turbinates (for chronic nasal obstruction).
      Genioglossus and hyod advancement is a surgical procedure for the treatment of sleep apnea. It prevents collapse of the lower throat and pulls the tongue muscles forward, thereby opening the obstructed airway.
      If surgery is too risky or unwanted, the patient may sleep every night with a nasal mask that delivers air pressure into the throat; this is called continuous positive airway pressure or "CPAP".

  42. QUESTION:
    Reason for snoring???
    I have had a UPPP surgery a few years ago to take care of my snoring. I was never dignosed with sleep apnea. I have since gained a few pounds. I am not obese (6'3" 240) I played a lot of football so I am naturally a big guy, but yes I could lose a few.

    My question is why am I snoring again? Is it due to the weight? It is driving my wife nuts and I feel really bad about it. What can I to? Thanks for your help.
    Thanks, apu_sen, but as I stated, I do not have sleep anea.

    • ANSWER:
      snoring results when the airflow during breathing is obstructed or blocked..

      the sound produced is due to the obtruction in your throat...
      the air you exhale can't go out freely because of the narrowed airway (due to the obstruction)

      it may be due to improper positioning when asleep...

      when planning to sleep..
      try extending your neck slightly so that the airway will be opened..and air will pass with ease...
      you can use pillows to make you comfortable..

      thanks

  43. QUESTION:
    Best time to take Melatonin? Staying Asleep?
    I've been having difficulties with sleep ever since I graduated from high school in 1999. I have been to a Sleep Doctor. Originally he diagnosed me with mild obstructive sleep apnea. I tried the CPAP but felt very clausterphobic while wearing it. I tried the life style changes they recommended with no change. I consulted a dentist regarding the dental application that pulls your bottom jaw forward a tad so your tongue doesn't close your air way off but for some reason we didn't find that to be a feesable option. So I went with the surgery. UPPP with tonsilectomy and minor rhinoplasty. (if you don't know what that is, basically they remove my tonsils, adnoids, and my uvula, shorten my soft palette and then trimmed down the muscle/tissue ridges in my nose) I went back for a follow up study since I still wasn't getting great sleep. My apnea is gone but the doctor said I "sleep with one eye open" and I can't relax into a deep sleep so I wake up often.

    Since all that occurred, I took this 3rd shift position to complicate matters further. I took melatonin previously but it didn't make a difference. So I was wondering if there was a recommended dosage and time of day I should take it. Should it be taken when I wake up? just before bed? A short time before bed?

    For more background, most times I seem to get only 3 to 4 hours of sleep at a time and after 4 to 5 hours of being awake, I am sleepy and want to go to bed again. If I sit for a while and my brain is not stimulated, then I fall asleep. I have tried almost all prescription sleep aides and OTC sleep aids. Oh they help with GETTING me to sleep... but nothing has helped with KEEPING me asleep. I have also taken the smallest dosage of Topamax to help relax me but that didn't work either.

    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Now with the Sleep Doctor telling you that you "sleep with one eye open" was he referring to Alpha Intrusion? Sometimes Doctor's will treat the most serious sleep disorders and not mention other problems that are hurting a person's sleep. As a RPSGT, I have seen many patients who have been treated for Sleep Apnea, be it CPAP, dental devices, or surgery, but when asked what they have done about there Alpha Intrusion or PLMS to help with their sleep, they will give me a blank look. When told about other sleep problems that a Sleep Study will show they will respond, "My Doctor never told me about that." It sounds like you are still having an underlying Sleep Problem that can be treated. If it is Alpha Intrusion, it is a waking brain wave that sneaks in on your sleep, most people complain that no matter how much sleep they get they do not feel refreshed, also they can think it takes them longer to fall asleep then it actually does. This can be caused by chronic pain syndromes(fibromyalgia, arthritis) and also psychological disturbances(stress, anxiety, depression), that is why some insomniacs are better helped by a psychiatrist as mentioned by one of the other people that answered your question. Hand in hand with Alpha Intrusion is what we call Spontaneous Arousals, this is the waking up often part you mentioned. Taking care of the underlying psychological disturbance can help with that "sleeping with one eye open" and the constant arousals.

  44. QUESTION:
    Help with spanish grammar?
    Can you check my grammar on this? I translated english to spanish

    Thanks!

    English-

    Surgical Treatments
    There are a variety of surgical treatments available to treat adult sleep apnea. Surgery to treat adult OSA involves the nose, throat, or neck area. Sometimes a combination of those areas may be necessary. The most common surgery to treat OSA is known as uvupalatopharyngoplasty or, UPPP, also known as UP3. In some people, the airway obstruction may be caused by excess tissue in the uvula or soft plate. In a UP3, part of the soft palate, the uvula, and some soft tissue on the side of the mouth are removed, which usually includes the tonsils, as well.

    Spanish-

    Tratamientos Quir rgicos
    Hay un variedad de tratamientos quir rgicos (available?) para tartar AOSS. Cirug a para tartar AOS adulto sepone el nariz, garganta o cuello. A veces, una combinaci n de estas zonas (may be) necesario. La Cirug a m s com n para tartar AOS se llama uvupalatopharyngoplasty o UPPP, tambien UP3. En algunas personas, ruta a rea (may be) causa de trama exceso en (the uvula o softplate??). En un UP3, un parte del (softplate?), la uvula y alg n trama blanda en el lado de la boca (are removed- son quitar??), cu l usualmente inclue las am gdalas tambien.

    • ANSWER:
      Tratamientos Quir rgicos
      Hay un variedad de tratamientos quir rgicos disponibles para tartar AOS. Cirug a para tartar AOS adulto/a incluye la nariz, la garganta o el cuello. A veces, una combinaci n de estas zonas puede ser necesaria. La cirug a m s com n para tartar AOS se llama uvupalatopharyngoplasty o UPPP, tambien UP3. En algunas personas, la obstrucci n de la v a a rea puede ser causa de un exceso en la envula/ la cala. En un UP3, una parte del (softplate? - sorry, can't find the correct expression! Please look up in a medical diccionary), la envula y alguna trama blanda del lado de la boca se quitan, lo cu l usualmente incluye las am gdalas tambien.

      What is AOS? Don't know if feminine or masculine. You have to decide. Maybe you mean "en adultos".

  45. QUESTION:
    Help from a spanish speaker?
    Please help me

    Is this a correct translation?

    English-

    Surgical Treatments
    There are a variety of surgical treatments available to treat adult sleep apnea. Surgery to treat adult OSA involves the nose, throat, or neck area. Sometimes a combination of those areas may be necessary. The most common surgery to treat OSA is known as uvupalatopharyngoplasty or, UPPP, also known as UP3. In some people, the airway obstruction may be caused by excess tissue in the uvula or soft plate. In a UP3, part of the soft palate, the uvula, and some soft tissue on the side of the mouth are removed, which usually includes the tonsils, as well.

    Spanish-

    Tratamientos Quir rgicos
    Hay un variedad de tratamientos quir rgicos (available?) para tartar AOSS. Cirug a para tartar AOS adulto sepone el nariz, garganta o cuello. A veces, una combinaci n de estas zonas (may be) necesario. La Cirug a m s com n para tartar AOS se llama uvupalatopharyngoplasty o UPPP, tambien UP3. En algunas personas, ruta a rea (may be) causa de trama exceso en (the uvula o softplate??). En un UP3, un parte del (softplate?), la uvula y alg n trama blanda en el lado de la boca (are removed- son quitar??), cu l usualmente inclue las am gdalas tambien.

    Thank you sooooo much!

    • ANSWER:
      Tratamientos quir rgicos.
      Hay un variedad de tratamientos quir rgicos disponibles para tratar la apnea del sue o en adultos. La cirug a para tratar la apnea obstructiva del sue o involucra la nariz, garganta o cuello. A veces una combinaci n de esas reas puede ser necesaria. La cirug a mas com n para tratar la apnea obstructiva del sue o se conoce como uvopalatofaringoplast a or UPPP, tambi n conocida como UP3. En algunas personas, la obstrucci n en las v as a reas pueden ser ocasionadas por un exceso de tejido en la vula o en el velo del paladar. En una UP3, parte del velo del paladar, la vula, y alg n tejido suave en el costado de la boca son removidos, lo que usualmente incluye las am gdalas tambi n.

  46. QUESTION:
    Yuck...I'm having surgery...?
    In March I'm having UPPP surgery. It stands for uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, and it's throat surgery. I'm having this in hopes to cure my sleep apnea (it's really severe--I'm not overweight, but I have a lot of excess throat tissue--it's a genetic defect). They will be taking out my tonsils as well as the remains of my adenoids (I originally had them removed when I was 6, but they grew back partially). They will also trim my soft palate and remove most of my uvula.

    I've talked this over with three different doctors and all think that this is a good thing to do, as do I. The drawback is that it's only a 50-50 chance at curing me, otherwise I'll have to use a BiPAP machine for the rest of my life.

    What are some possible side effects from this, if you know someone who has had it? I've been warned by each doctor that the recovery period is a minimum of two weeks and it can easily be 2 months before I'm back to normal...
    Okay, thanks. I'm 17 if it helps.

    • ANSWER:
      My friend had this a few years ago. The pain the few few days was bad. Any motion caused pain and that's hard to avoid! (swallowing and such) You are also on total voice rest, I believe, for the first few days after surgery for the same reason. My friend later developed a granuloma at the surgical site that led to more voice rest and down-time. All that said she's glad she had it done.

  47. QUESTION:
    Get discharged or get surgery?
    Im 22, diagnosed with sleep apnea been in the USMC for 2 1/2 years. I have been prescribed a cpap machine and did not elect to have surgery. The medical officer at my unit told me that since I did not elect to have the surgery I will be admin seperated without benefit or the GI bill. The UPPP surgery has a 50% faliure rate so I could get all cut up and still have sleep apnea but they will give me my benefits then cause I tried.
    Apparently there are so many claims for apnea that they just show you the door. I have no history prior to entering the military. My pressure setting on the cpap is 12 I guess that's kind of high. Should I attempt to make a VA claim at this point? Deploying is out of the question right now my unit is out the door in serial months. surgery recovery time and if it don't work back on the cpap. any one gone through this before have any advice.
    22 years old 5'9" 180 lbs. started before my first deployment end of 09 and 2010 but never really thought anything of it. came back from afghan 20 lbs lighter still suffering from the same symptoms. I have High blood pressure and a deviated septum from birth.
    this past january I had the sleep studies done had about 35 episodes in 5 hours that I slept

    I have had a consult with ENT and the precedures will go in the order of nose, tonsils then the soft palete and tounge. 3 surgeries and I only have 1 1/2 years left on my contract with no plans to reenlist. The doctor explained the #1 treatment is cpap

    • ANSWER:
      Surgery. To lose all of your benefits would suck! You have a 50% of being cured. If you aren't you keep benefits, keep your GI Bill, you can go back to school on the Marines. I would opt for the surgery, easy answer.

  48. QUESTION:
    Large Bumps on the Back of My Tongue?
    About 2 months ago I noticed these large bumps on the back on my tongue. The bumps are quite large about 2-4mm in diameter and are a yellowish color.

    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/560/tongue1.jpg/

    http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/190/tongue2a.jpg/

    I have no idea what they are, they dont hurt or have any feeling in them. There is 4 that I can see but there may be more beyond view.
    They have recently appeared as I used to always inspect my tongue after receving UPPP surgery for my obstructive sleep apnea disorder only recently had I recently slowed my tongue inspections.
    I am a daily marijuana and cigarette smoker and have taken other recreational drugs in the past months.
    I work on a construction site and I have been wearing a respirator for the past few months while spray painting, could it be gathering moisture/harboring bacteria?
    Im hoping its not an oral STI either :/ a couple months ago I tongue kissed a girl who may not have been the cleanest of kinds...

    Has anyone had the same problem? What should I do? Im using antibacterial mouthwash daily already...

    • ANSWER:

  49. QUESTION:
    Does sleep apnoea/apnea tend to occur in rem/nrem sleep?
    &how is it diagnosed and treated.. preferably not mentioning the operations.
    Thank you !

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep apnoea, or at least the obstructive version, OSA, occurs when you loose muscle tone and the upper airway/throat collapses. The ore relaxed the muscles, the more prone to collapse. The deeper the sleep, the more relaxed the muscles become, the more prone again they become to collapse. But indeed once it happens, you get a micro-arousal as the brains doesn't like to be starved of oxygen so it shoots some adrenalin in your system to wake you up briefly but long enough to take a proper breath. Hence the gasping and choking noises in between the snoring.

      So yes, often it is worse in deep sleep, if you even get that far but REM sleep is also associated with OSA as per the research in my sources.

      Regardless of which phase it happens in, it needs to be sorted as it really messes with your health and well-being.

      OSA is diagnosed in a variety of ways. Can be in-home with a simple finger pulse oximetry sleep study or a multi-channel respiratory sleep study. The former records blood oxygen levels and heart rate alone, the latter supplements this with air flow, chest movement, body position and sometimes records the sound of snoring.

      If you have complex health issues, they may prefer a study in the clinic, often a full polysomnogram indeed with brain-wave wires etc. These will detect the sleep phases but often that info isn't necessary for a simple OSA case.

      Once they've worked out with this study whether you are a case of mild, moderate or severe OSA (depending on the number of breathing obstructions per hour) they can determine which therapy is best for you.

      For mild OSA, weightloss or a mandibular advancement device tend to be the first line of treatment. Sometimes sinus irrigation or changing sleep positions can do the trick here.

      For moderate and severe OSA, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, or CPAP for short, is the gold standard. Weightloss is still advisable, is of course your OSA is due to excess fatty tissue in the throat and around the neck.

      There are no medications to reliably sort out any severity of OSA though there are a few surgical options that either tackle the source (weight loss surgery or jaw surgery) or the problem (UPPP etc.).

  50. QUESTION:
    what is sleep apnea with hypersomnia?

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep apnea: The temporary stoppage of breathing during sleep, often resulting in daytime sleepiness. Apnea is a Greek word that means "want of breath."

      The most common form of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. In obstructive sleep apnea, the muscles of the soft palate around the base of the tongue and the uvula relax, obstructing the airway. The airway obstruction causes the level of oxygen in the blood to fall (hypoxia), increases the stress on the heart, elevates blood pressure, and prevents the patient from entering REM sleep, the restful and restorative stage of sleep. In other words, sleep apnea causes deprivation of quality sleep.

      The symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea include loud snoring and/or abnormal pattern of snoring with pauses and gasps. Other symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness, memory changes, depression, and irritability. In some patients sleep apnea can contribute to high blood pressure, heart failure, stroke, and heart attack.

      Obstructive sleep apnea typically affects middle-age, overweight men, and may affect women in later years. Obstructive apnea can be aggravated by alcohol, sleeping pills and tranquilizers taken at bedtime.

      Sleep laboratories are now available to monitor different stages of sleep, diagnose sleep apnea, determine the type (obstructive or central) and severity of sleep apnea, and design treatment. General measures in treating obstructive sleep apnea include losing excessive weight, avoiding alcohol and sedatives, sleeping on one side, and medications to relieve nasal congestion.

      CPAP -- which stands for continuous positive airway pressure -- is an effective treatment for sleep apnea. A mask is worn over the nose during sleep while compressed air is gently forced through the nose to keep the airway open. Different patients need different mask sizes and different pressure levels for optimal treatment results.

      Another type of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea is ENT surgery. In an operation called UPPP, the surgeon removes excessive soft tissue from the back of the throat to relieve obstruction.

      hope this has helped some...
      Fernie....:)

sleep apnea uppp

Sleep Apnea Ucla

With all the available medical treatments for sleep apnea, the vast majority of cases still remain undiagnosed and untreated due to a lack of awareness. To further increase the awareness concerning sleep apnea, the American Sleep Apnea Association is looking for sleep apnea patients and encouraging them to share their concerns. This may be the best medication yet! The ASAA believes that, by promoting awareness among the sufferers themselves, they will be able to prevent more cases from going undiagnosed. This method was established to promote information effectively just like a homepage on the internet which provides pop-up boxes for inquiries, testimonials, and related stories. In the case of the ASAA plan, formerly treated patients will hopefully create pop-up diagnoses amongst their friends, family members or acquaintances who were previously undiagnosed. The diabetes society and cancer society, for example, use this same technique to promote awareness through their previously diagnosed patients.

Of course, like any other disease or health condition, medical research has come up with many forms of medication for sleep apnea. These medications are usually oral and they prevent and control muscle collapse in the throat which occurs during sleep. This is what causes airway blockage and then results in sleep apnea. It won't be you who will determine the suitable treatment however! It is only your doctor who can determine which treatment will be best.

There are many medicated treatment plans for sleep apnea and one of the more famous and intriguing approaches that has shown great results is the Pilar Procedure. This procedure is carried out by placing three small woven inserts into the soft palate of the mouth. This reduces the vibrations that cause the snoring noise in sleep apnea patients. According to the FDA, this treatment is approved and is virtually pain free. About eighty percent of all patients suffering from sleep apnea and snoring have been satisfied with the comfortable effect of this approach. This is even true considering that it can be done in one simple office visit!

Treatment of the more mild cases of sleep apnea is often done through changes in lifestyle. These changes in lifestyle include avoiding medication that causes relaxation of the central nervous system such as sedatives and muscle relaxants. Instead, they incorporate the losing of weight, the quitting of smoking and the avoidance of alcohol. They also involve sleeping in a different position with the help of a special pillow. This pillow is a device that keeps you from sleeping on your back to keep the airway open during sleep. This tells us that good posture while sleeping contributes to the quality of sleep. The likes of a water bed or a good quality bed mattress, for instance, may also provide a comfortable and relaxing position that result in a deeper sleep.

Less fortunate individuals who suffer from a more severe case of sleep apnea are typically treated using air blowing machines called Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (C-PAP) machines. This instrument blows air into the nose of the patient via a tube and a mask. For a more severe situation, another type of machine called a Bi-Level Machine (Bi-PAP) works by blowing two different pressures of air to help the lungs breathe in and out properly.

In cases where the modification of either the uvula or the dangling tissue at the rear of the throat is needed, uvulopalatopharygoplasty or UPPP is a form of surgery that can be carried out. In children, Adenotonsillectomy along with weight normalization is considered to be the first line of treatment. This procedure is characterized by the removal of tonsils and adenoids to increase the cross-sectional airway of the patient. Occasionally, medical procedures such as these only help the problem but do not totally eliminate it. Therefore, they must still be accompanied by a device like a C-PAP, nasal mask, face mask, gel mask or nasal pillow.

Keeping your healthy lifestyle and regaining your happy family life are the most significant reasons for seeking medical treatment for sleep apnea. Bear in mind that only a doctor can determine the causes and the type of the treatment which suits you best. It is up to you to seek out the proper diagnosis from a doctor and attend to this very serious problem of sleep apnea

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is sleep disorder a real nightmare for many couples?

    • ANSWER:
      During the day, Lawrence Neumann was a mild mannered man, considerate, kind and loving to his wife of many year, Bonnie.

      In the middle of the night, as they tried to sleep, he became someone else -- screaming obscenities, grunting, kicking, punching. Bonnie in the arm, violently hurling himself out of bed.

      For 16 years, the couple from Streator, Ill., had no idea what was happening or why night after night. The doctors they consulted were at a loss to explain the strange symptoms.

      "Nobody seemed to know anything about it," said Lawrence, 73.

      Relief came at long last in the form of diagnosis from a neurologist at Northwestern University's Reinberg School of Medicine. Lawrence had a little known condition, REM sleep behavior disorder, in which people act out their dreams, unconsciously, during sleep. That diagnosis was a turning point, since the condition is easily treatable.

      Nine out of 10 people who suffer the disorder are men. Most are 50 or older, although new research is finding a higher prevalence of the disorder in younger adults as sleep problems gain more attention, according to Dr. Bradley Boeve, a professor of neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, and a leading expert on the condition.

      "Several patients we've seen, their spouse will describe first encountering this on their wedding night," he said.

      Estimates suggest one in every 200 adults has the strange affliction, caused by a dysfunction in a part of the brain that suppresses muscle activity while people are in REM sleep, a dream-filled phase of slumber.

      The prevalence of REM sleep behavior disorder might be much higher in seniors. Notably, ( percent of 2,300 adults 70 to 90 surveyed in Minnesota's Olmsted County reported symptoms consistent with the diagnosis.

      "Even if only half actually have it, that's still 4 to 5 percent -- and that makes it pretty common," Boeve said.

      A growing body of research suggest the condition is a precursor to Parkinson's disease and Lewy body dementia in up to 25 to 50 percent of patients. Why this is so is not yet clear, but neurons in adjacent areas of the lower brainstem appear to be implicated, according to Minnesota's Dr. Carlos Schenck, one of the physicians who first described REM sleep behavior disorder.

      Circle Pines man struggles

      Asked about patients, Schenck described men who have jumped through windows while asleep, strangled their bed partners, smashed into dressers, knocked themselves unconscious, and given their wives black eyes. Typically, their experiences are eerily similar: Men dream they're being chased or hounded by large insects, animals or threatening people and have to defend themselves, Schenck said. Almost inevitably, the dreams are colored by violence and aggression.

      One of Schenck's patients is Cal Pope, 85, of Circle Pines, who had seen 400 men go down on a ship in the South Pacific in World War II.

      "I was sure he was reliving that," said his wife, Rowena, 81, who would watch Cal kick the wall fiercely and threaten to crush people's heads in the middle of the night.

      It took nine years for Pope to get a proper diagnosis and treatment.

      Sleep study is a start

      To be evaluated, patients need an expert sleep study, with electrodes placed on their arms and legs to track movements during slumber, said Dr. Alon Avidan, an associate professor of neurology at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. A videotape will capture the patient's activities and other conditions, such as sleep apnea, that can cause similar symptoms. Also, alcohol, coffee and certain antidepressants can serve as triggers for REM sleep behavior episodes.

      Symptoms are relieved 90 percent of the time by clonazepam (also known as Klonopin), a medication commonly used to treat anxiety, panic attacks and seizure disorders. It helps patients sleep more soundly, wake up less often and have fewer episodes when they do. Many patients also are helped by melatonin, which is being studied at Northwestern as a treatment for REM sleep behavior disorder.

      For Lawrence and Bonnie Neumann, night became a time of danger, suffused with the potential for injury. Once, after leaping out of bed in the midst of an episode, Lawrence hit his head on a nightstand, opening a large gash. Another time, he threw himself out of bed head first, smashing his forehead on the floorboards and causing a concussion. It was routine for him to start kicking his wife, dreaming a bear was sneaking up on him.

      "The mood was one of defense against attack," he remembered. "If she tried to touch me, I'd come after her."

      Bonnie put pads around the bedroom furniture so Lawrence couldn't hurt himself. Other couples take sharp objects away, put mattresses on the floor, arrange foam barriers between them, or move their bedrooms to the ground floor so they don't leap out of second-story windows.

      After extensive neuropsychiatric tests and three sleep studies, Lawrence was finally diagnosed with REM sleep behavior disorder in 2008. Doctors gave him clonazepam, which worked like a charm, while also treating a mild case of sleep apnea, which can contribute to episodes.

      "It was the first time in more than 16 years that I could say I got a good night's sleep," Lawrence said. "I sleep really well now."

  2. QUESTION:
    How can I prevent snoring?
    I know I'm overweight because of depression & my medicine. It's very difficult to lose weight, & I don't like annoying people by snoring. When I was younger & skinnier, I used to be a silent sleeper. What are the consequences of snoring?

    • ANSWER:
      It is estimated that more than 80 million people in North America snore while sleeping. National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that 30% of the population under 40 years of age snores, while 50% over the age of 60 does. Spouses and children are often repeatedly disturbed during their sleep cycles by a snoring family member, which can lead to tensions and animosity.

      Sleep apnea and snoring can be frustrating for patients and their loved ones. Lack of sleep and the associated physical affects can be life altering or life ending. Recent studies have linked a high percent of patients with sleep apnea and snoring with an increase in arteriosclerosis of the carotid arteries of the neck. This can lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular problems such as heart attack or stroke. Snoring can kill you, according to a UCLA School of Dentistry study: the struggle for breath can result in soaring blood pressure which can damage the walls of the carotid arteries and increase the risk of stroke.

      Snoring and sleep apnea can also worsen serious health problems including hypertension, leading to stroke, heart attacks, heart failure and puts the patient at an increased risk for sudden death. The National Council on Sleep Disorders attributes 38,000 cardiovascular deaths per year to consequences of sleep apnea.

      What causes snoring?

      During sleep, the muscles and soft tissue in the throat and mouth relax making the breathing airway smaller. This decrease in the airway space increases the velocity of air flowing through the airway during breathing. As the velocity of required air increased in the constricted space, soft tissue like the soft palate and uvula vibrate. These vibrations of the soft tissues in the mouth and throat result in what is called "noisy breathing" or generally referred to as snoring. It has also been shown in sleep studies that excess body weight especially in the throat area, heavy alcohol consumption and other sedatives increase the severity of snoring.

      Relaxed and collapsed airway produces soft tissue vibrations during breathing which result in snoring.

      With a SILENT NITE device the airway remains open allowing easier breathing and preventing snoring.

      Surgical techniques to remove respiration impairing structures such as uvula, enlarged tonsils and adenoids have been among the many attempted snoring remedies. These soft tissue surgical procedures have shown only moderate success rates (e.g. 20 - 40%). At certain levels of severity, complete blockage of the airway space by soft tissues and the tongue can occur. If this period of asphyxiation lasts longer than 10 seconds, this is called Obstructive Sleep Apnea

      The majority of snorers can be treated with dentist prescribed oral snoring appliances such as the Silent Nite. This also serves as a wonderful adjunct in those patients who do require surgery to treat their OSA and snoring, increasing success to 85 - 90% in those patients.

      What are the symptoms Snoring and Sleep Apnea?

      Waking up after a full night in bed and feeling tired
      While you sleep, do you jump or jerk
      Waking with a headache
      Feeling sleepy during the day
      Falling asleep during the day
      Waking during the night with a feeling of gasping for air
      Unable to concentrate during the day
      Decrease in psychomotor behavior such as sexual activity
      Snore loudly or erractically

      Self Test For Sleep Apnea

      How can I prevent snoring?

      Snoring is involuntary but changes in your lifestyle an alleviate occasional snoring.

      Avoiding sedatives and antihistamines
      Lose weight to increase the airway space.
      Daily exercise to improve muscle tone
      Quit smoking
      Get treatment for allergies is you have them
      Sleep on your side instead of your back ( when you sleep on your back, your tongue falls backwards into your throat, which can narrow your airway and partially block airflow)
      Avoiding alcohol and heavy meals 3-4 hours before bedtime
      Sleeping with a pillow that supports the neck and does not cause the head to be held at a sharp angle
      Keeping the air moist in your bedroom, as dry air causes the membranes to more readily collapse.
      Nasal sprays for snorer whose nasal passages are blocked due to swelling or increased mucous
      Oral appliances with a cost range from to ,000.
      Read about sleep disorders :"Sleep Disorders for Dummies".
      Avoid caffeine it is one of the main culprits in sleep disorders.

      How can snoring and sleep apnea be treated?

      Snoring and sleep apnea both are sleep disordered breathing. Simply snoring represents a mild disorder where breathing becomes very loud but the upper airway is only partially obstructed during sleep.

      Snoring is a common symptom of obstructive sleep apnea. However, sleep apnea is a serious medical disorder that occurs because the airway is totally obstructed during sleep and breathing completely stops for 10 seconds or more. In one night 20 to 30 involuntary breathing pauses can occur. If your partner hears loud snoring punctuated by silences and then a snort or choking sound as you resume breathing, this pattern could signal sleep apnea.

      18 million Americans suffer from undiagnosed and untreated sleep apnea. This disorder may:

      Raise your blood pressure
      Decrease the flow of oxygen to your brain
      Fatigue
      Decreased work performance
      Impaired daytime functioning
      Hart failure
      Possibly for stroke

      Depending on the severity of your snoring and sleep apnea several approaches can be used. Often they are used in combination to eliminate the problem.

      Oral appliances such as the Silent Nite, can be used either alone or following surgery to help increase the airway space.

      Continuous positive airway pressure (C-pap) involves the use of a mask worn over the nose during sleep that blows air into your throat to maintain an open airway decreasing airway collapse.

      Surgical approaches include; trimming of the soft palate and uvula with a laser called laser assisted uvuloplasty (LAUP). Radio-frequency devices have been used to shrink tissues in the throat and nose. Correction of deviated septum and trimming of the bony turbinates of the nose has been used to increase nasal airflow.

      How does the Silent Nite prevent snoring?

      Snoring research has shown that custom fabricated dental appliances worn at night that move the lower jaw into a forward position, increase the three dimensional space in the airway tube which reduces air velocity and soft tissue vibration. By increasing the volumetric capacity of the airway and preventing soft tissue vibrations, snoring is eliminated. In clinical research studies, these dentist fabricated oral appliances have exhibited initial snoring prevention success rates of between 70 to 100%.

      The Silent Nite~ appliance positions the lower jaw into a forward position by means of special connectors that are attached to the upper and lower forms. These forms are custom laminated with heat and pressure to the dentist s model of your mouths providing an excellent and comfortable fit with minimal size to the appliance.

      Breathing is EASIER with the Silent Nite appliance

      The Silent Nite does not interfere with breathing through the mouth. Even when nasal passages are congested the device prevents snoring and allows uninhibited oral breathing. The connectors allow the patient to move the jaw side to side and open and close the mouth minimizing potential stiffness in the joints of the jaw in the morning. Silent Nite appliances help promote deeper, more restful sleep by preventing snoring. You wake feeling better rested and more energetic.

      How can I determine if the Silent Nite appliance will benefit me?

      A simple test is to put your teeth together, close your lips and inhale through your nose. You should then open your mouth and move your lower teeth slightly in front of your upper teeth (a bull dog like bite) and close your lips. When inhaling through your nose you should notice improved airflow and less snoring noise. If the result to this test is positive (less noise and better breathing) then the SilentNite appliance will benefit you. This therapy has been shown in studies to help 85% of patients that snore or have sleep apnea. The remaining 15% require other therapeutic approaches (i.e. surgical) to correct the problem.

      Snoring may indicate sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a serious disease - and is said to reduce lifespan by about 10 years, be associated with heart problems, memory problems, impotence. It's not about snoring - it's about life and death. Present it correctly to your patients and not many refuse diagnosis.

      According to a recent study, untreated sleep apnea may increase a person's risk of motor vehicle accidents. That's because sleep apnea, a snoring condition characterized by intermittent airway obstruction, can deprive you of sleep, making driving a danger. But accident risk is reduced when sleep apnea is treated.

      Your dentist can help diagnose this condition or refer you to a specialist. If your dentist thinks your have sleep apnea he may refer you to a physician or sleep specialist. For a proper diagnosis you may have to undergo an overnight sleep study. With a proper diagnosis your dentist and doctor can work closely together to implement a therapy to help you.

      Source: RealAge Benefit: Getting 6 to 8 hours of sleep per night can make your RealAge as much as 3 years younger

      New Research:

      Curing The Snore

      With the news this week that snoring and chronic daily headache are linked, here are simple exercises that help in reducing snoring frequency and volume, for those who don't want to take drugs daily

      Tongue and throat exercises, if practiced diligently over a period of time, may be of great benefit in reducing snoring. Repeat each of the following exercises 5 times each, twice daily:

      1) Slowly open and close your mouth to its full extent, making sure the lips meet when closing.
      2) Pucker your lips (as if about to kiss). Hold for a count of 10. Relax.
      3) Spread your lips into a big, exaggerated smile. Hold. Relax.
      4) Mix Exercises 2 & 3: Pucker-Hold-Smile-Hold.
      5) Try to pucker with your mouth wide open, without closing your jaws together. Hold & relax.
      6) Close your lips and press them tightly together.
      7)Close your lips firmly, then make a 'slurping' noise, as if sipping a drink.
      8) Open your mouth and stick out your tongue. Be sure your tongue comes straight out of your mouth and doesn't go off the side. Hold, relax and repeat several times. Work toward sticking your tongue out farther each day, but still pointing straight ahead.
      9) Stick out your tongue and move it slowly from corner to corner of your lips. Hold in each corner, relax and repeat several times. Be sure your tongue actually touches each corner each time.
      10) Stick out your tongue and try to reach your chin with the tongue tip. Hold at the farthest extension.
      11) Stick out your tongue and try to touch your nose with the tongue tip. Hold at farthest extension.
      12) Stick out your tongue. Hold a spoon upright against the tip of your extended tongue and try to push it away while your hand holds the spoon in place.
      13) Repeatedly stick your tongue in and out as fast as you can.
      14) Flick your tongue from corner to corner as quickly as you can.
      15) Move tongue all around your lips in a circle as quickly as you can, making sure you stay in constant contact.
      16) Open and close mouth as quickly as you can, making sure your lips close each time. 17) Say 'Ma-Ma-Ma-Ma' as quickly as possible, ensuring there's an 'em' and an 'ah' sound each time.
      18) Repeat with 'La-La-La-La.'
      19) Repeat with 'Ka-Ka-Ka-Ka' as quickly and accurately as you can.
      20) Repeat with 'Kala-Kala-Kala-Kala.'
      21) Gargle loudly with warm water.
      22) Sing through the vowel sounds (A-E-I-O-U) as loudly as you can (or dare). Songs like 'Old McDonald Had a Farm' are also good. Further information Further advice for patients can be found in Scott E. Dr. The Natural Way to Stop Snoring Talkaboutsleep.com britishsnoringentnet.org snoring.com

      Snoring associated with head shape. CWRU researchers find snoring associated with head shape. Approximately 75 percent of the time, the
      investigator was able to predict whether the individual was a snorer.
      In addition to reducing the cardiovascular problems and accidents
      snorers suffer, one of the benefits of the study is that head shape can now be used to find new ways to lower the fortissimo of the nightly music to a soft lullaby.

      or you can read this article :

      You probably know at least one person who snores. It could be your partner, parents, grandparents, or even Uncle Ed or Aunt Emma that makes that sawing wood sound. Some laugh and make jokes about it, but it can be a symptom of a serious disorder.

      As you age, your tissues become looser and the decibel level leaps. By age 60, 60 percent of men become expert woodcutters every night. Once you are in the major leagues of snoring, you could be in deep trouble and the sooner you attempt to prevent snoring, the better it is for you.

      It s usually women who look tired since men tend to snore more. It can create stress within a family and it can also be an indicator of serious medical problems. Studies show that severe snoring can lead to sleep disorders, high blood pressure, strokes, heart attacks and diabetes.

      Common culprits include alcohol, sleep medication and cold remedies. Even an overly soft or large pillow could be the cause. Obesity, sleeping on your back and lack of muscle tone are also cited. There are some less common reasons such as abnormalities in the nose. In children, it s often enlarged adenoids or tonsils that are responsible for the snoring.

      Cures range from everyday home cures to lifestyle changes and over-the-counter medications. In severe cases, various types of surgery may be the options for stopping one from snoring.

      If you are someone who snores excessively and constantly gets complaints from friends and loved ones, look at your lifestyle very carefully first. Try changing some bad habits to good ones, and exercise more.

      If after all this, you still snore excessively, then it is better to see a physician or an ear, nose and throat specialist. Always make surgery your last resort. Even though surgery is proven to be safe, surgery can be expensive, when all you needed to do was quit smoking or join a gym.

      Snoring Info provides detailed information about how to stop snoring, including specific snoring cures, remedies, and treatments to help prevent snoring from disrupting your sleep, health, and relationships. Snoring Info is the sister site of Hair Loss Web

sleep apnea ucla

Sleep Apnea Uptodate

With all the available medical treatments for sleep apnea, the vast majority of cases still remain undiagnosed and untreated due to a lack of awareness. To further increase the awareness concerning sleep apnea, the American Sleep Apnea Association is looking for sleep apnea patients and encouraging them to share their concerns. This may be the best medication yet! The ASAA believes that, by promoting awareness among the sufferers themselves, they will be able to prevent more cases from going undiagnosed. This method was established to promote information effectively just like a homepage on the internet which provides pop-up boxes for inquiries, testimonials, and related stories. In the case of the ASAA plan, formerly treated patients will hopefully create pop-up diagnoses amongst their friends, family members or acquaintances who were previously undiagnosed. The diabetes society and cancer society, for example, use this same technique to promote awareness through their previously diagnosed patients.

Of course, like any other disease or health condition, medical research has come up with many forms of medication for sleep apnea. These medications are usually oral and they prevent and control muscle collapse in the throat which occurs during sleep. This is what causes airway blockage and then results in sleep apnea. It won't be you who will determine the suitable treatment however! It is only your doctor who can determine which treatment will be best.

There are many medicated treatment plans for sleep apnea and one of the more famous and intriguing approaches that has shown great results is the Pilar Procedure. This procedure is carried out by placing three small woven inserts into the soft palate of the mouth. This reduces the vibrations that cause the snoring noise in sleep apnea patients. According to the FDA, this treatment is approved and is virtually pain free. About eighty percent of all patients suffering from sleep apnea and snoring have been satisfied with the comfortable effect of this approach. This is even true considering that it can be done in one simple office visit!

Treatment of the more mild cases of sleep apnea is often done through changes in lifestyle. These changes in lifestyle include avoiding medication that causes relaxation of the central nervous system such as sedatives and muscle relaxants. Instead, they incorporate the losing of weight, the quitting of smoking and the avoidance of alcohol. They also involve sleeping in a different position with the help of a special pillow. This pillow is a device that keeps you from sleeping on your back to keep the airway open during sleep. This tells us that good posture while sleeping contributes to the quality of sleep. The likes of a water bed or a good quality bed mattress, for instance, may also provide a comfortable and relaxing position that result in a deeper sleep.

Less fortunate individuals who suffer from a more severe case of sleep apnea are typically treated using air blowing machines called Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (C-PAP) machines. This instrument blows air into the nose of the patient via a tube and a mask. For a more severe situation, another type of machine called a Bi-Level Machine (Bi-PAP) works by blowing two different pressures of air to help the lungs breathe in and out properly.

In cases where the modification of either the uvula or the dangling tissue at the rear of the throat is needed, uvulopalatopharygoplasty or UPPP is a form of surgery that can be carried out. In children, Adenotonsillectomy along with weight normalization is considered to be the first line of treatment. This procedure is characterized by the removal of tonsils and adenoids to increase the cross-sectional airway of the patient. Occasionally, medical procedures such as these only help the problem but do not totally eliminate it. Therefore, they must still be accompanied by a device like a C-PAP, nasal mask, face mask, gel mask or nasal pillow.

Keeping your healthy lifestyle and regaining your happy family life are the most significant reasons for seeking medical treatment for sleep apnea. Bear in mind that only a doctor can determine the causes and the type of the treatment which suits you best. It is up to you to seek out the proper diagnosis from a doctor and attend to this very serious problem of sleep apnea


sleep apnea uptodate

Sleep Apnea Urination Night

With all the available medical treatments for sleep apnea, the vast majority of cases still remain undiagnosed and untreated due to a lack of awareness. To further increase the awareness concerning sleep apnea, the American Sleep Apnea Association is looking for sleep apnea patients and encouraging them to share their concerns. This may be the best medication yet! The ASAA believes that, by promoting awareness among the sufferers themselves, they will be able to prevent more cases from going undiagnosed. This method was established to promote information effectively just like a homepage on the internet which provides pop-up boxes for inquiries, testimonials, and related stories. In the case of the ASAA plan, formerly treated patients will hopefully create pop-up diagnoses amongst their friends, family members or acquaintances who were previously undiagnosed. The diabetes society and cancer society, for example, use this same technique to promote awareness through their previously diagnosed patients.

Of course, like any other disease or health condition, medical research has come up with many forms of medication for sleep apnea. These medications are usually oral and they prevent and control muscle collapse in the throat which occurs during sleep. This is what causes airway blockage and then results in sleep apnea. It won't be you who will determine the suitable treatment however! It is only your doctor who can determine which treatment will be best.

There are many medicated treatment plans for sleep apnea and one of the more famous and intriguing approaches that has shown great results is the Pilar Procedure. This procedure is carried out by placing three small woven inserts into the soft palate of the mouth. This reduces the vibrations that cause the snoring noise in sleep apnea patients. According to the FDA, this treatment is approved and is virtually pain free. About eighty percent of all patients suffering from sleep apnea and snoring have been satisfied with the comfortable effect of this approach. This is even true considering that it can be done in one simple office visit!

Treatment of the more mild cases of sleep apnea is often done through changes in lifestyle. These changes in lifestyle include avoiding medication that causes relaxation of the central nervous system such as sedatives and muscle relaxants. Instead, they incorporate the losing of weight, the quitting of smoking and the avoidance of alcohol. They also involve sleeping in a different position with the help of a special pillow. This pillow is a device that keeps you from sleeping on your back to keep the airway open during sleep. This tells us that good posture while sleeping contributes to the quality of sleep. The likes of a water bed or a good quality bed mattress, for instance, may also provide a comfortable and relaxing position that result in a deeper sleep.

Less fortunate individuals who suffer from a more severe case of sleep apnea are typically treated using air blowing machines called Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (C-PAP) machines. This instrument blows air into the nose of the patient via a tube and a mask. For a more severe situation, another type of machine called a Bi-Level Machine (Bi-PAP) works by blowing two different pressures of air to help the lungs breathe in and out properly.

In cases where the modification of either the uvula or the dangling tissue at the rear of the throat is needed, uvulopalatopharygoplasty or UPPP is a form of surgery that can be carried out. In children, Adenotonsillectomy along with weight normalization is considered to be the first line of treatment. This procedure is characterized by the removal of tonsils and adenoids to increase the cross-sectional airway of the patient. Occasionally, medical procedures such as these only help the problem but do not totally eliminate it. Therefore, they must still be accompanied by a device like a C-PAP, nasal mask, face mask, gel mask or nasal pillow.

Keeping your healthy lifestyle and regaining your happy family life are the most significant reasons for seeking medical treatment for sleep apnea. Bear in mind that only a doctor can determine the causes and the type of the treatment which suits you best. It is up to you to seek out the proper diagnosis from a doctor and attend to this very serious problem of sleep apnea

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is exercising advisable when you have sleep apnea?
    I have symptoms of sleep apnea like feeling very sleepy throughout the day, frequent urination, waking up suddenly at night (though i do not feel short of breath at such times. but i do feel that way couple of times a day). I am a smoker and drinker, although i am cutting down on both and trying to quit (no, thats not supposed to sound like m doing a great job) i want to lose some weight as well, and am thinking of rejoining the gym. would it be advisable?

    • ANSWER:
      Absolutely. Exercise will definitely help. I'd like to point out 2 things. 1) sleep apnoea is associated with a higher incidence of heart disease, 2) it's commoner in sedentary people.
      apparently you are overweight also, and coupled with your smoking that's three risk factors going against you. Suggest you consult your health provider and get your blood sugar and blood pressure checked.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is the problem of frequent urination at night related to sleep Apnea?
    I have sleep Apnea and I got the CPAP machine recently and by the grace of God I am able to sleep well. At night I also get up several times from my sleep i.e., about 6 to 10 to pee. From the day I started using the machine the problem of frequent urination has also disappeared. Is there any co-relation between sleep apea and frequent urination?

    • ANSWER:
      The only guess I can make is that when you were having the sleep apnea, you weren't sleeping as deeply, hence your body sensed everytime you had to urinate. Now that you are sleeping more deeply, you are probably just not noticing that you have to go as frequently. Like I said, just a guess.
      As a side note: frequent urination at night (nocturia) can be a sign of health problems (diabetes, prostate problems, etc.) so you might want to let your PCP know about this symptom.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are your tips that can help me get a goodnight sleep?
    I have a hard time sleeping lately, it takes me quite sometime before i can sleep even if I'm very tired. I also have the tendency to wake up in the early hours of the morning and I can't go back to sleep.

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  4. QUESTION:
    How to avoid sleeping too much?
    I have been getting these horrible cluster headaches (sharp stabbing pain always behind left eye). So I've been monitoring them to see what causees them, and it seems like a only get them on the weekends, usually right when I wake up after I've been sleeping for a long time. I love sleep and it's like my hobby. But I don't want to get these hadaches anymore. Any suggestions?
    No s*h*i*t bmac.
    I don't sleep in late, I fall asleep real early on accident, sometimes 6 or 7 pm. So even if I set an alarm in the moring that wouldn't help
    Cluster headaches are different from migrains. There treated very differently, since clusters can't be cured with pain meds, they usually have to give you 100% oxygen for a few minutes or a shot(forgot what it's called)

    • ANSWER:
      The headaches and sleeping excessively are symptoms of a sleep disorder called Obstructive Sleep Apnea, or OSA.

      What are the signs and symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

      Loud snoring
      Dry mouth in the morning
      Unrefreshing sleep and morning grogginess
      Headaches on awakening
      Night sweats
      Indigestion during the night
      Problems with memory and concentration
      Increased urination at night
      Daytime sleepiness
      Irritabilty and/or fatigue during the day
      Depression

      The most common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea are snoring, gasping for breath, choking, short pauses in normal breathing patterns, and sudden awakening when sleeping. During the day, you may have headaches and feel extremely drowsy because you do not sleep well at night. In severe cases, obstructive sleep apnea can eventually lead to heart failure and pulmonary complications because the lungs can t provide enough oxygen to the blood, or remove enough carbon dioxide.

      You may feel like you have slept all night or during naps, but with OSA your body is continually working in overtime to keep you breathing. When an obstruction occurs your heart rate increases to help push oxygen to your brain, your brain is telling your chest wall and abdominal wall to continue the motion of breathing to try and force the airway open. You awaken enough to take a breath and then fall back asleep where the cycle begins again.

      You may not recognize or have the other symptoms listed, but the only way to know if you have the sleep disorder is to contact your physician and request a sleep study.

      Your doctor will perform a sleep study. This is a painless test in which you stay overnight in a hospital or independant sleep study laboratory. Sleep labs are designed to be like hotel rooms. While you sleep, respiratory therapists or sleep techswill monitor and register functions such as heart rate, respiratory rate, airflow, and blood oxygen levels. A audiovisual system also records snoring and body position.

      Treatment of OSA is done with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP that splits the airway open while you sleep relieving the obstruction and the symptoms of OSA, including headaches and excessive sleepiness.

      You can get more information from http://www.sleepapnea.org/info/index.html

  5. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have liver or kidney problems problems?
    I'm always tired and sore and just not feeling right.Many many nighttime trips to the bathroom. Lots of nightmares too. Could it be my liver or kidney? Or am I just a hypochondriac. I ask here because I don't like seeing doctors.
    Only one "problems", lol. Sorry for the typo.

    • ANSWER:
      Nocturia is a common problem defined as waking at night to void a completely separate issue from urinary frequency throughout the day. These nighttime wakings can cause significant sleep disturbances and have even been linked to depression and decreased productivity. Most of the time, symptoms of nocturia are progressive and can vary from night to night. Rarely does it come on as a sudden, new condition.

      Any disorder that results in one or more of the following can contribute to nocturia: 1) increased volume of nighttime urine output, 2) low bladder voids or 3) generalized sleep disturbances.

      There are various causes of increased urine output during the night. Normal nighttime variation in the naturally occurring hormone vasopressin prevents nighttime voiding. This variation may be disrupted for various reasons. Additionally, solutes normally made by the body need to be excreted and the timing of this and varying amounts may affect urination. Furthermore, fluid shifts in patients with chronic swelling due to heart failure, venous insufficiency or heavy protein excretion can also lead to nighttime urination. Finally, damage to central nerves can result in inappropriate nighttime urination as in Parkinson s disease or stroke.

      Possible causes of low bladder voids include low bladder volumes or overactive bladder and bladder obstruction (e.g. related to benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) or enlarged prostate). Decreased bladder volume and overactive bladder is common in seniors. BPH is common in men and may or may not be related to prostate cancer. Medications and/or surgery may help.

      Finally, primary sleep disturbances (e.g. obstructive sleep apnea or restless leg syndrome) may create a misperception about the reason you are waking up. Sleep studies that monitor patients while they sleep can help detect sleep disorders and provide treatment recommendations.

      A thorough history of symptoms, current medications, intake and output of fluids and comorbid medical problems can help your doctor determine the cause of your nighttime waking. From there, appropriate treatment options can be determined and you can get a good night s rest.

      Sounds like you'd better go see the Doc. Even if you don't like them (maybe you just haven't found the right one yet).

  6. QUESTION:
    I used to be tired all the time and always need a nap and now it seems like it takes me forever to fall asleep
    I haven't been able to go to bed until at least after 2 every night for the last week and half to two weeks and before that I would always get tired easily and want naps. I am 18 and not overweight. Why could this be?

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  7. QUESTION:
    What causes insomnia when one is tired at night?
    I dont drink coffee or eat any caffeine in any form.

    • ANSWER:
      There are many causes, but they can include:

      1. Emotional Distress
      More particularly when it is from internalized anxiety or anger, emotional problems can easily trigger this sleep disorder.

      2. Substance Abuse
      Drinking too much coffee, colas or other "energy-upper drinks" is known to cause insomnia. Caffeine from these drinks is the main reason. Chain smokers can also be easy victims of insomnia because of the nicotine that cigarettes contain.

      Herbal remedies, alcohol and other medications can also make one prone to becoming an insomniac. Some may think that alcohol, when consumed, can make one feel drowsy. But little did they know that in the long run, when the alcohol gets metabolized, sudden wakefulness will follow.

      3. Biological Clock Disturbance.
      Also known as circadian rhythm, one's body clock, when altered, can damage the amount of sleep one can peacefully enjoy. This body clock disturbance can be caused by an irregular slumber schedule because of too much siesta or partying too late at night.

      It can also be jetlag or body clock disturbance due to traveling by plane to some place where there is a different time zone. Other causes may be the grave yard schedules of workers and cramming review season for students induced by exams.

      4. Environmental Factors
      Extreme temperatures can disrupt one's sleeping patterns. Noise and bright lights can have the same effect too. Homesickness or when one is forced to sleep in an unfamiliar place is also one reason behind getting into the habit of not having enough sleep.

      5. Health Problems
      Health disorders such as diabetes, heart failure, hyperthyroidism, ulcers, and Parkinson's disease can also induce insomnia. Asthma may also be one health problem that makes one prone to insomnia because of an asthmatic's shortness of breath.

      Frequent urination, heartburn, and chronic pain from leg cramps, tooth ache and arthritis can also cause insomnia.

      Psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression are also possible culprits for insomnia. Snoring with prolonged pauses in breathing while at sleep, also known as sleep apnea can also cause insomnia.

      Periodic arm and leg movements during sleep causing the muscles to twitch excessively is one underlying cause of this sleep disorder. Another cause is narcolepsy or one's lack of control on whether to stay awake or to fall asleep, is another cause of this sleep disorder.

      6. Pre-bedtime Activities
      Engaging to vigorous activities such as exercise just right before bedtime can deprive one of a good night's sleep. Consuming large meals when one is just about to sleep can also make one experience this sleeping disorder. This is because when metabolism is at its most active thus the body prompts one to stay awake.

      Risk Factors:
      Reports have it that 90% of people can acquire transient insomnia at some point in their lives. While an estimate of 30% suffers from its chronic form.

      a. Women are said to be more at risk in acquiring insomnia because of the following reasons:

      - Pre-menstrual syndrome with symptoms of irritability, depression and anxiety, and bloating due to menstruation disturbs a woman's sleeping pattern.
      - Menopause can also change a woman's sleeping pattern.
      - Pregnancy makes sleeplessness one common thing to happen.

      b. Elderly people are also prone to getting insomnia because ageing alters one's sleeping patterns.

      c. Depressed people have lighter slumbers compared to those who don't feel this psychological condition.

      d. Students or younger ones who are conscious with their grades (because of cramming) can easily become insomniacs too.

      With that vast information on what causes insomnia and who are at risk with this sleeping disorder, one can easily ward off this annoying condition.

      Prevention:

      Balance and perspective:
      At certain times, insomnia may result from stress.
      Massage techniques can ease tense necks, aching shoulders and upright torsos, and face massage can be an instant calmer.

      Some stress is an inevitable part of life, but when you need to achieve a state of inner calm, a range of meditation and visualization techniques can help you work through your insecurities, worries and anxieties.

      With practice, stress can be diminished so that it is no longer a cause of sleepless nights.

      A calm environment:
      Lack of sleep can also be exacerbated by external factors such as noise, a busy atmosphere in the bedroom, or simply the wrong type of mattress.

      By making the best of your physical environment, you can reduce or remove many of these detrimental factors.

      Following the principles of feng shui you can arrange your bedroom space to best effect and remove clutter that can clog free-flowing chi or energy.

      Choosing a calming room d cor and lighting scheme can soothe the senses, while establishing a bed-time ritual can make sleep a pleasant and comforting experience to look forward to.

      Pampering treatments:
      In view of the many demands made by daily life, it is essential to find time to switch off from cares and worries in the evening, and indulge in some personal quality time.

      However busy you are, you should take time to wind down before trying to go to sleep, otherwise your mind will still be buzzing with the concerns of the day.

      Surrounding yourself with gentle candlelight and sinking into a hot bath laced with aromatherapy oils or herbal sachets can go a long way to soothe and prepare your body for sleep.

      Essential oils such as lavender and clary sage added to the water help to diminish tension headaches and muscular aches, while bath bags or bath salts made with chamomile help to ease stress.

      You can also use the natural energies from flowers and herbs as a base for warming foot baths, soporific sleep pillows and effective sleep tinctures.

      Bedtime snacks:
      You ate dinner at 6pm; it s now 11.30pm and you re ready to go to bed, but now you re feeling hungry and thirsty again.

      What do you do? Instead of raiding the refrigerator for a substantial and perhaps indigestible meal, it is better to opt for a light snack, such as toast with a topping and perhaps a hot, comforting beverage.

      Try to avoid tea and coffee as they are stimulants and will tend to keep you awake if you drink them late in the day.

      Instead, herbal teas prepared for their sedative properties may be sipped in the evening, while warm, milky drinks are ideal for consumption before bed milk contains peptides that calm the system.

      The occasional hot toddy can also provide a delicious way to wind down, and this is particularly good on a cold winter s evening, especially if you are suffering from a cold.

      Calming the psyche:
      Sometimes it is difficult to sleep due to excessive emotions, such as fear, excitement or anxiety. Crystal therapy can help to calm heartache; choosing the right stones can also calm restlessness and anxiety, and help to regulate sleep patterns.

      Crystals can be helpful when bad dreams and nightmares are keeping you awake, as can techniques such as visualizing a guardian angel or spiritual protector. When you have perplexing or mystifying dreams, it can be very helpful to write down what happened before you forget, so that you can ponder and try to analyze them later on.

      Working towards an understanding of your dreams adds an enjoyable richness to what can be the fascinating pageant of sleep.

      Exercise to relax:
      Keeping the body moving is essential for good sleep without exercise, you 3will not be physically tired enough to rest at night. Aerobic activities such as walking and cycling exercise the heart and tone the muscles, while some specific yoga techniques provide an excellent way to stretch and relax.

      This free ebook downlod explains Insomnia causes and how to fix it naturally with home remedies and behaviour modification

      http://www.thehealthsuccesssite.com/Sleep-disorders-free-health-book-download.html

  8. QUESTION:
    How Do I get Better Sleep?
    I get plenty of sleep (6 to 8 hours) but I m still finding that I m tired and have no energy when I wake up and during the day. What sort of diet and general things I can do to improve my sleep.

    • ANSWER:
      You do NOT have to be over 30 years old or obese to have
      Obstructive Sleep Apnea. OSA affects those of all ages and
      sizes, though many with OSA do have a higher BMI (body mass index).

      Excessive sleepiness despite the hours and hours of
      sleeping is a symptom of a sleeping disorder called Obstructive Sleep Apnea or OSA.

      What are the signs and symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

      Loud snoring
      Dry mouth in the morning
      Unrefreshing sleep and morning grogginess
      Headaches on awakening
      Night sweats
      Indigestion during the night
      Problems with memory and concentration
      Increased urination at night
      Daytime sleepiness
      Irritabilty and/or fatigue during the day
      Depression

      The most common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea are snoring, gasping for breath, choking, short pauses in normal breathing patterns, and sudden awakening when sleeping. During the day, you may have headaches and feel extremely drowsy because you do not sleep well at night. In severe cases, obstructive sleep apnea can eventually lead to heart failure and pulmonary complications because the lungs can t provide enough oxygen to the blood, or remove enough carbon dioxide.

      You may feel like you have slept all night or during naps, but with OSA your body is continually working in overtime to keep you breathing. When an obstruction occurs your heart rate increases to help push oxygen to your brain, your brain is telling your chest wall and abdominal wall to continue the motion of breathing to try and force the airway open. You awaken enough to take a breath and then fall back asleep where the cycle begins again.

      You may not recognize or have the other symptoms listed, but the only way to know if you have the sleep disorder is to contact your physician and request a sleep study.

      Your doctor will perform a sleep study. This is a painless test in which you stay overnight in a hospital or independant sleep study laboratory. Sleep labs are designed to be like hotel rooms. While you sleep, respiratory therapists or sleep techswill monitor and register functions such as heart rate, respiratory rate, airflow, and blood oxygen levels. A audiovisual system also records snoring and body position.

      Treatment of OSA is done with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP that splits the airway open while you sleep relieving the obstruction and the symptoms of OSA, including headaches and excessive sleepiness.

      You can get more information from

      http://www.sleepapnea.org/info/index.html

  9. QUESTION:
    Why is sleep apnoea associated with nighttime sweating and urination ?

    • ANSWER:
      Sleep Apnea and Night Sweats
      Sleep apnea, the (stopping of breathing while sleeping) can be alleviated in some patients by sleeping in a different position. The problem arises when that position is found to be less comfortable to the patient causing sweating and they revert to the old position that causes them breathing problems. irregardless of wearing a mask or knowing the bottom line cause of apnea. Being able to sleep in a different position is vital to many sleep apnea patients. Night sweats will keep you from finding the comfort zone and staying in a pro-active sleep position.

      Ask the Doctor:
      Why does sleep apnea sometimes lead to frequent urination at night?

      from the August-September 1996 issue of WAKE-UP Call
      Nocturia, or nocturnal urination, is sometimes a symptom of sleep apnea. In fact, nocturia among younger individuals--who are less likely to have other medical causes of nocturia--is a strong indicator of sleep apnea. While the precise relationship has not been thoroughly studied, it appears that the most likely reason patients with untreated sleep apnea have more frequent urination at night is related to the increased pressure in the right side of the heart. This increased pressure is usually the result of low oxygen levels in the bloodstream caused by the apnea events: when oxygen levels fall, the heart works harder to get oxygen to the brain.

      An increased pressure in the heart is a sign that there is too much liquid in the body: when the heart receives the stimulus of the increased pressure, higher levels of a hormone called atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are secreted. ANP is a diuretic that is associated with the increased need to urinate.

      When sleep apnea is effectively treated, nighttime urination is also reduced. Studies have shown that ANP levels in patients with untreated sleep apnea are increased and levels reduced in patients using CPAP effectively. Remember, not all causes of frequent urination are related to untreated sleep apnea; prostrate problems, for example, may cause increased need for urination. Discuss any concerns you may have with your doctor.

      Patrick J. Strollo, Jr., MD is the Medical Director of the Pulmonary Sleep Evaluation Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School.

  10. QUESTION:
    I have an 8am-5pm job. How would I got about getting used to sleeping early and waking up early?

    • ANSWER:
      You need to ensure that you get enough sleep and you sleep at fixed time to allow you body natural cycle stabilized.

      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  11. QUESTION:
    Can anyone guess what sleep disease is this?
    Hi all,

    I have been struggling from all day tiredness/fatigue for the last 3 yrs. I sleep well and get up tired and no energy to do excercise or even walking. I push myself to office and feel very tired and exhausted in office, without doing any work in office.
    My personality significantly changed from a dynamic one(3 years back) to a meek and humble/tired person.

    I am infact overweight, and have High BP (for which i have been prescribed for the last 3 years). I also have a burning and / or tightening feelilng in my chest (during this feeling I am feelling further more tired and want to be in bed all day).

    This tiredness is ruining my life. I am getting up feeling tired and exhausted. Everyday i feel better in the evenings (probably around 4 pm to 7 pm) and that is the only time I do a lot of work in the office and rest of the time I am dead in the office.

    Went to a neurologist.....he has done an EEG...perfectly normal

    He prescribed 6 tablets a day..no effect at all.

    • ANSWER:
      First, change neurologists, he should have caught this.
      You, my friend, just described me a few years ago.
      You just think you are sleeping well.
      That is what is tricky about sleep apnea, you do not know that you are waking up every minute or so to take a breath.
      That results in serious lack of REM(rapid eye movement) sleep. Your brain needs REM and so does your body. Lack of it builds up a severe sleep debt that is causing your symptoms.
      To check it out prior to a sleep study, have someone watch you sleep. If they tell you snore and then stop for several seconds, suddenly ending it with a strong gasp or intake of air, you're in the sleep apnea club.
      When the muscles in your airways relax as you fall asleep, they can block your airway. Due to this blockage, you quit breathing in your sleep. Your heart begins to speed up, trying to pump oxygen rich blood to your brain, only it has none because you haven't taken a breath. Finally your brain kicks in and wakes you up enough to take a breath. This you don't remember upon waking. I was clocked(?) at 120 episodes of this per hour, which means every 30 seconds my brain woke me.
      Other signs are more frequent urination at night, falling asleep while sitting or driving, or waking with a choking feeling. These all depend on to what degree you have it.

      Remember, only a doctor can properly diagnose this but to this layman, it sure sounds all too familiar.

  12. QUESTION:
    Why is it that when I have something to do or somewhere to go I can sleep the best?

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  13. QUESTION:
    I have a snoring problem, How can I reduce it?

    • ANSWER:
      Snoring can be a symptom of a serious problem. If you snore other than seasonally due to allergies or during a cold. You need to have a sleep study. Snore strips, and sprays only mask the problem. If you only snore on your back the tennis ball treatment works.

      Sleep apnea is serious. Take the online test at

      www.sleepnet.com.

      From http://hme-providers.com/disease_states/sleep_apnea.asp

      If you or someone you know snores regularly and has one or more of the following symptoms, it may be Obstructive sleep Apnea. The following are some common signs and symptoms of Sleep Apnea:

      Snoring, interrupted by pauses in breathing
      Gasping or choking during sleep
      Restless sleep
      Excessive sleepiness or fatigue during the day
      Poor judgment or concentration
      Irritability
      Memory loss
      High blood pressure
      Depression
      Obesity
      Large neck size (16" in women
      Crowded airway
      Morning headache
      Sexual dysfunction
      Frequent urination at night

  14. QUESTION:
    Sleep apnea symptoms and treatments?
    Hi,

    Which are the sleep apnea symptoms?

    Which are the best treatments for Sleep Apnea?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi

      Sleep apnea symptoms are:

      - Headaches in the morning
      - Frequent urination in the evening or night hours
      - Moody or experiencing a change in your personality
      - Can t concentrate, focus or loss of memory
      - Dry throat in the morning as you wake up

      I find my treatment with the help from John Brooks in his Ebook "Natural Ways to Stop Snoring"

      Great Ebook!

      You can see more informacion and Vdeo on his site:

      http://www.howtostopsnoringremedies.com/

      Hope this Helps!

  15. QUESTION:
    Why am i still wetting myself after had antibiotics for it ?

    • ANSWER:
      Antibiotics is not the quick -fix med for "bed wetting."

      Bed-wetting, also known as nighttime incontinence or nocturnal enuresis, isn't a sign of toilet training gone bad. It's often just a developmental stage.

      Stress incontinence, UTI ( Urinary tract Infections); sleep Apnea; Diabetes; ; hormonal imbalance; chronic constipation and anatomical defect are among the other causes

      .
      Treatment

      Most children outgrow bed-wetting on their own. If there's a family history of bed-wetting, the child likely will stop at the age the parent did.

      Limiting fluids before bedtime and double voiding urinating at the beginning of the bedtime routine and then again just before falling asleep may help.

      You may want to encourage your child to delay daytime urination as well. If the bladder isn't completely full, the urge to urinate may fade within a few minutes. With practice, this simple "stretching exercise" may help your child's bladder hold more urine at night

  16. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of fibromyalgia? Is there a cure out there?

    • ANSWER:
      While the symptoms of fibromyalgia can be debilitating, they are not life threatening. Symptoms vary, depending on stress level, physical activity, time of day, and the weather. Pain is the primary symptom, found in virtually 100% of cases specifically, pain and tenderness in certain areas of the body when pressure is applied to them. These areas include: Back of the head , Elbows ,Hips , Knees , Neck, Upper back , Upper chest .

      Pain may be aching, burning, throbbing, or move around the body (migratory). Many patients also experience muscle tightness, soreness, and spasms. The patient may be unable to carry out normal daily activities, even though muscle strength is not affected. The pain is often worse in the morning, improves throughout the day, and worsens at night.

      Other common symptoms of fibromyalgia include:

      Sleep disorders (e.g., restless leg syndrome, sleep apnea) .
      Gastrointestinal (e.g., abdominal pain, bloating, gas, cramps, alternating diarrhea and constipation) . Numbness or tingling sensations . Chronic headaches (may include facial and jaw pain) . Heightened sensitivity to odors, loud noises, bright lights, various foods, medicines, and changes in weather . Painful menstrual periods (dysmenorrhea) and painful sexual intercourse (dyspareunia) . Frequent urination, strong urge to urinate, and painful urination (dysuria) . Rapid or irregular heart rate, and shortness of breath . Sensation of swelling (edema) in the hands and feet, even though swelling is not present

      Each fibromyalgia patient is different and may require individualized treatment. An active exercise program, low-dose anti-depressants, acupuncture, psychotherapy, behavior modification therapy, chiropractic care, massage and physical therapy, used alone or in conjunction with one another, may provide some relief of symptoms.

  17. QUESTION:
    Why do i feel sleepy all the time?
    for the last three days, I've been sleeping at something like 2:30-3:00 am and waking up at 10:30-11:00 am. however, in spite of that, i want to sleep more and getting out of bed is an effort. not only that, i feel sleepy throughout the day. what's happening to me?

    • ANSWER:
      Well with the limited information at my disposal, I can suggest a few possibilities.

      Are you able to sleep through the night regularly?
      Try to cut down on caffeine or nicotine 3 hours before bedtime. Do not play video games 1 hour before bed.

      Some potential causes of your sleepiness...
      Sleep apnea: This is where you actually stop breathing and wake up several times throughout the night, you may not even realize you do this. Frequent urination and sleepiness are symptoms of this.

      Anemia: If you're deficient in any minerals, particularly iron.. you may feel sleepy and/or dizzy throughout the day. Your blood cells are deprived of oxygen which bonds to the iron, and can cause your body to shut down (become sleepy). A simple blood test by a doctor can detect this. He/she may prescribe iron supplements and/or a change in diet.

      Depression: I'm sure you're aware if you're depressed or not. Depression can have severe physical symptoms such as pain, swelling, and even exhaustion.

      However, this is more often common in older or overweight person(s). Though not limited to.

      Another possibility is chronic fatigue syndrome which is characterized by a person feeling overly tired even after a full night of sleep.

      I suggest you see your primary care physician

  18. QUESTION:
    Why do people wake up in the middle of the night? Does it effect the quality of sleep?
    I need details please because Im doing a school project.
    thank you.
    (If possible, provide website)

    • ANSWER:
      People who have sleep apnea also wake up several times, sometimes hundreds of times, due to disruption in their breathing. Sometimes they're not even aware of it! People can also wake up during the night cause of pain in the back, hips and legs or frequent urination. Yes, this absolutely affects the quality of sleep/amount of sleep that you get, leaving you tired during the day, less alert, and it affects your immune system. Did you know someone who does not get enough sleep has an increased risk of a heart attack?
      You can do a Google Search on Sleep Apnea or Sleep Disturbances for more information.

  19. QUESTION:
    symptoms sleep apnea : what are the symptoms sleep apnea has ?
    i am a woman of 32 years. i am happily married. since some days, my husband says that he thinks i am suffering from sleep apnea. By the way, what exactly are the symptons sleep apnea has ? even some of my friends feel that i have sleep apnea. i too feel the same. can anyboy tell me what are the symptoms sleep apnea has..

    • ANSWER:
      yes it can be very serious problem. you should take it seriously as your husband said you. well there are some symptoms and signs of sleep apnea like Morning headaches, Memory or learning problems and lack of concentrate, Feeling irritable, depressed or disbtrub, personality changes and most importantly Urination at night. you may get some guidance from versed resource. i should advise you look over the site sleepdisorder to sort out the symptoms sleep apnea. i believe it will help you a lot. you can get it from the source below.

  20. QUESTION:
    I think my friends brother has a medical problem..?
    My best friend's brother is eight years old and he still pee's the bed, everynight. Im very concerned, i think its a medical problem.. Any Advice, symptoms, or recomendations?

    • ANSWER:
      Bed-Wetting (aka Nocturnal Enuresis) isn't a sign of toilet training gone bad. It's often just a developmental stage.

      Children who've never been dry at night are considered to have primary enuresis. Children who begin to wet the bed after at least six months of dry nights are considered to have secondary enuresis.

      Generally, bed-wetting before age 6 or 7 isn't cause for concern. At this age, nighttime bladder control simply may not be established..

      Most kids are fully toilet trained between ages 2 and 4 but there's no target date for developing complete bladder control.

      A small bladder;Inability to recognize a full bladder;A hormone imbalance (During childhood, some kids don't produce enough anti-diuretic hormone, or ADH, to slow nighttime urine production);Stress;Urinary tract infections(UTI);Sleep apnea;Diabetes;( bedwetting might be the first sign of Type 1 DM) Chronic constipation and rarely anatomical defect.

      Bedwetting tends to run in families.
      You should encourage your friend's parents to take him to a Dr.

      Consult your child's doctor if:

      Your child still wets the bed after age 5 or 6
      Your child starts to wet the bed after a period of being dry at night
      The bed-wetting is accompanied by painful urination, unusual thirst, pink urine or snoring

      If bed-wetting continues, treat the problem with patience and understanding. Bladder training, moisture alarms or medication may help. Although frustrating, bed-wetting without a physical cause doesn't pose any health risks. The guilt and embarrassment a child feels about wetting the bed can lead to low self-esteem, however

      Treatments and drugs

      *Most children outgrow bed-wetting on their own. If there's a family history of bed-wetting, the child likely will stop at the age the parent did.

      *Limiting fluids before bedtime and double voiding urinating at the beginning of the bedtime routine and then again just before falling asleep may help.

      *You may want to encourage your child to delay daytime urination as well. If the bladder isn't completely full, the urge to urinate may fade within a few minutes. With practice, this simple "stretching exercise" may help your child's bladder hold more urine at night.

      *Change a child's sleeping and waking pattern.

      *If your child is still wetting the bed by age 7 and is motivated to stop a doctor may recommend more aggressive treatment

      Alternative therapies
      Therapies such as massage, acupuncture and hypnosis.

      Coping and support

      *Adopt good habits. Limit your child's fluid intake during the evening. Make sure your child urinates before going to bed and perhaps again when you turn in for the night. Remind your child that it's OK to use the toilet during the night if needed. Use small nightlights so that your child can easily find the way between the bedroom and bathroom

      *Be sensitive to your child's feelings
      *Put your child to bed earlier
      *Plan for easy cleanup e.g.plastic cover for the mattress. .
      *Enlist your child's help to wash his wet nightclothes.
      *Celebrate effort. Don't punish or tease your child for wetting the bed. Instead, praise your child for following the bedtime routine and helping clean up after accidents

  21. QUESTION:
    question about best way to take oxycontin?
    we got two oxycontin 30mg oxycontins a peice and have never taken them before? what would be the best way for us to take them. they are time release, so we dont want to swallow them because we will be up all night messed up and we dont want that, so what should we do?

    • ANSWER:
      First take with plenty of water, minimum 8 ounces, and take as directed by your physician ... they information is on the prescription data ...

      From http://www.drugs.com/oxycontin.html ...

      "... OxyContin is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is similar to morphine.

      OxyContin tablets are used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. Oxycodone is not for treating pain just after a surgery unless you were already taking oxycodone before the surgery.

      OxyContin may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.
      Important information about OxyContin

      OxyContin may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. OxyContin should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

      Do not drink alcohol while you are taking OxyContin. Dangerous side effects or death can occur when alcohol is combined with a narcotic pain medicine. Check your food and medicine labels to be sure these products do not contain alcohol.

      Never take more than your prescribed dose of OxyContin. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain. OxyContin can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Do not stop using OxyContin suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.

      Do not use OxyContin if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a narcotic medicine (examples include methadone, morphine, Oxycontin, Darvocet, Percocet, Vicodin, Lortab, and many others), or to a narcotic cough medicine that contains codeine, hydrocodone, or dihydrocodeine.

      You should also not take OxyContin if you are having an asthma attack or if you have a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus.

      OxyContin may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. This medicine should never be shared with another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

      Before using OxyContin, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

      * asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;
      * liver or kidney disease;
      * underactive thyroid;
      * curvature of the spine;
      * a history of head injury or brain tumor;
      * epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
      * low blood pressure;
      * gallbladder disease;
      * Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorders;
      * enlarged prostate, urination problems;
      * mental illness; or
      * a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

      FDA pregnancy category C. OxyContin may be harmful to an unborn baby, and could cause addiction or withdrawal symptoms in a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. OxyContin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine..."

  22. QUESTION:
    Why am I always so tired?
    All I want to do is sleep. I hate it.
    I don't work out but I am active at work, I do have a hard time
    falling asleep and staying asleep.
    Any suggestions would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      If you are always tired, you may have sleeping problem, or more specifically, sleep apnea.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_apnea

      Otherwise:-

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  23. QUESTION:
    Why do I feel tired all the time and have bags in my eyes, when i get good rest?...?
    This happens when i sleep 4 hrs or 10hrs!...Im 20 yrs old i hope that helps when answerin my question!

    • ANSWER:
      Excessive sleepiness despite the hours and hours of sleeping is a symptom of a sleeping disorder called Obstructive Sleep Apnea or OSA.

      What are the signs and symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

      Loud snoring
      Dry mouth in the morning
      Unrefreshing sleep and morning grogginess
      Headaches on awakening
      Night sweats
      Indigestion during the night
      Problems with memory and concentration
      Increased urination at night
      Daytime sleepiness
      Irritabilty and/or fatigue during the day
      Depression

      The most common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea are snoring, gasping for breath, choking, short pauses in normal breathing patterns, and sudden awakening when sleeping. During the day, you may have headaches and feel extremely drowsy because you do not sleep well at night. In severe cases, obstructive sleep apnea can eventually lead to heart failure and pulmonary complications because the lungs can t provide enough oxygen to the blood, or remove enough carbon dioxide.

      You may feel like you have slept all night or during naps, but with OSA your body is continually working in overtime to keep you breathing. When an obstruction occurs your heart rate increases to help push oxygen to your brain, your brain is telling your chest wall and abdominal wall to continue the motion of breathing to try and force the airway open. You awaken enough to take a breath and then fall back asleep where the cycle begins again.

      You may not recognize or have the other symptoms listed, but the only way to know if you have the sleep disorder is to contact your physician and request a sleep study.

      Your doctor will perform a sleep study. This is a painless test in which you stay overnight in a hospital or independant sleep study laboratory. Sleep labs are designed to be like hotel rooms. While you sleep, respiratory therapists or sleep techswill monitor and register functions such as heart rate, respiratory rate, airflow, and blood oxygen levels. A audiovisual system also records snoring and body position.

      Treatment of OSA is done with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP that splits the airway open while you sleep relieving the obstruction and the symptoms of OSA, including headaches and excessive sleepiness.

      You can get more information from http://www.sleepapnea.org/info/index.html

  24. QUESTION:
    I want to check up if I have Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA).?
    What kind of doctor should I see? Are the regular ones in clinics suffice? What kind of test will I have to take to determine if I have OSA?
    Thank you Marie and Kudo for your reply. Both answers are great. I forgot to tell that I live in Malaysia and I don't really think it is that easy to find a sleep specialist here compared to in the USA. (or maybe I didn't look hard enough). Thank you again for the replies. I will go see a doctor today, maybe.

    • ANSWER:
      You probably want to know what is sleep apnea, what causes sleep apnea and find proper treatment.

      When people falls asleep, the muscles attached to the tongue relax. If you slept on your back, the tongue intended to fall back into your throat. For a sleep apnea patient, this will be a problem since the fatty tongue will bock the breathing passage and suspend the breathing even your lung try to breathe. When no fresh air bring in oxygen to your lung, there will be no oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange. Your blood oxygen level will be low and carbon dioxide will be high. Generally if the oxygen is lower than 90%, your brain thinks something is wrong and try to wake you up. For most of sleep apnea patient, they can be wake up easily to active muscles to retract tongue from blocking breathing and resume breathing. Sometimes The brain cells controlling your feet got signal quicker and active your feet ahead of the muscles attached to your tongue and lung. For this scenario, your brain will send stronger signals to wake you up to resume breathing which could lead to your feet movement.

      you may see a sleep specialist or an ENT doctor for a sleep study.

      During sleep apnea study, they will put sensors on patient's feet to monitor the foot movement and compare with breathing. if foot movement is prior to the resume of breathing, it might indicate an apnea.

      from the symptoms you described (restless, lack of energy snore loud, sleep talk), likely you have sleep apnea even though you may see other symptoms such as day time sleepness, morning headache, red light or stop doziness.

      Sleep apnea could lead to a lot of health problems such as hypertension, frequent urination, heart failures, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.

      Sleep apnea is treatable. because it is a physical structural disorder, not a medical condition. unless it is caused by other medical conditions, it is not treatable by medications. it can be treated by some devices such as CPAP machine, a oral device, most popular one is Snorefighter (http://www.kudosnore.com/) and surgeries.

      suggest you to see an ENT doctor or a sleep a specialist. they may ask you for overnight hospital study. before to schedule a study please make sure your insurance covers the cost. it is very expensive (over 00 a night)

      i am in CT between NY and Boston. you may contact Yale University or Yale new Haven hospital for a study.

      hopefully this helps

  25. QUESTION:
    I want stop sleeping, can you help me?
    I sleep to much, I can't stop, sometimes over 16 hours a day, some people call it laseness even myself, but started to suspect it could be an illness, I try wake up early around 7:30, have a shower, lots of coffee, but around twelve I fell sleep wherever I am, I never had that problem before, maybe now could be because I spent the last 3 years working over night, I heard something called hormones upside down, I don't know, do you know about something that could help put more oxigen in my brain so I don't need to much of sleep? thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      What you need to do is see your doctor. There are many conditions associated with oversleeping.

      Sudden or persistent fatigue, despite adequate rest, may mean it's time for you to consult your doctor. Unrelenting exhaustion may be a sign of an underlying medical problem. In general, talk to your doctor if you're extremely tired or unable to regain your energy after several weeks of increased rest. Medical causes of fatigue can include:

      Anemia
      This blood disorder results from a number of problems that affect your blood's ability to transport oxygen, causing fatigue.

      Cancer
      Fatigue can be a symptom of cancer. A thorough checkup, including routine cancer screenings, can help rule out malignancy as a cause of your fatigue.

      Depression
      A loss of energy that's accompanied by any number of symptoms, including sadness, loss of appetite, difficulty sleeping or oversleeping, a lack of interest in pleasurable activities, and difficulty concentrating may be a part of depression.

      Diabetes
      Extreme fatigue can be a warning sign of diabetes. Signs and symptoms of diabetes, in addition to fatigue, include excessive thirst, frequent urination, blurred vision and recurring infections.

      Medications
      Prescription or over-the-counter medications may cause fatigue or make you too restless to sleep well. Antihistamines, cough and cold remedies, some antidepressants, and many other drugs may make you tired. Talk to your doctor if you suspect your medications are making you tired.

      Restless legs syndrome (RLS)
      This condition is characterized by an inability to keep your legs still and by tingling or aching sensations in your legs, feet or arms. The symptoms generally occur at night, preventing sound sleep.

      Sleep apnea
      Signs of this disorder include loud snoring, pauses between breaths and awakening frequently while gasping for air. It's a common source of fatigue because it interferes with sound sleep. Losing weight and quitting smoking may help, as well as an adjustment in sleeping position. Lying on your side or facedown may reduce snoring.

      Thyroid problems
      Hypothyroidism is a condition in which your thyroid gland fails to make or release enough thyroid hormone. Signs and symptoms include sluggishness, chronically cold hands and feet, constipation, dry skin and a hoarse voice. Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which your thyroid produces excessive amounts of hormone. Too much hormone also can cause fatigue, muscle weakness, weight loss, increased heart rate, nervousness and irritability.

      A diagnosis of exclusion: Chronic fatigue syndrome
      Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complicated disorder characterized by extreme fatigue that doesn't improve with bed rest and may worsen with physical or mental activity. Of all chronic illnesses, chronic fatigue syndrome is one of the most mysterious.

      Severe and debilitating fatigue, muscle aches and difficulty concentrating are the most commonly reported symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome. In some cases, low-grade fevers and swollen lymph nodes also may develop.

      A diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome is based on exclusion. This means that before arriving at a diagnosis, a doctor has ruled out any other disease or condition that may be causing your fatigue and related symptoms.

  26. QUESTION:
    Support for Sleep Apnea?
    I am a 41 yr old female of average weight. I sleep on my side. I can get 7+ hrs. of sleep and be exhausted by lunchtime. I have been experiencing night sweats and waking up 2-3 times to urinate. I have also been informed that my snoring is becoming more frequent (close to nightly). I have a Dr.s appt Tuesday and will be keeping a sleep journal. I would be more than grateful to have my snoring stop so my spouse will not sleep on the couch. I am just very nervous that I may have sleep apnea, and just want to hear some thoughts and experiences with sleep apnea.

    • ANSWER:
      You probably want to know what is sleep apnea, what causes sleep apnea and find proper treatment.

      When people falls asleep, the muscles attached to the tongue relax. If you slept on your back, the tongue intended to fall back into your throat. For a sleep apnea patient, this will be a problem since the fatty tongue will bock the breathing passage and suspend the breathing even your lung try to breathe. When no fresh air bring in oxygen to your lung, there will be no oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange. Your blood oxygen level will be low and carbon dioxide will be high. Generally if the oxygen is lower than 90%, your brain thinks something is wrong and try to wake you up. For most of sleep apnea patient, they can be wake up easily to active muscles to retract tongue from blocking breathing and resume breathing. Sometimes The brain cells controlling your feet got signal quicker and active your feet ahead of the muscles attached to your tongue and lung. For this scenario, your brain will send stronger signals to wake you up to resume breathing which could lead to your feet movement.

      you may see a sleep specialist or an ENT doctor for a sleep study.

      During sleep apnea study, they will put sensors on patient's feet to monitor the foot movement and compare with breathing. if foot movement is prior to the resume of breathing, it might indicate an apnea.

      from the symptoms you described (restless, lack of energy snore loud, sleep talk), likely you have sleep apnea even though you may see other symptoms such as day time sleepness, morning headache, red light or stop doziness.

      Sleep apnea could lead to a lot of health problems such as hypertension, frequent urination (http://www.kudosnore.com/updates/Sleep_Apnea_vs_Urinations.html), heart failures, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.

      Sleep apnea is treatable. because it is a physical structural disorder, not a medical condition. unless it is caused by other medical conditions, it is not treatable by medications. it can be treated by some devices such as CPAP machine, a oral device, most popular one is Snorefighter (http://www.kudosnore.com/) and surgeries.

      suggest you to see an ENT doctor or a sleep a specialist. they may ask you for overnight hospital study. before to schedule a study please make sure your insurance covers the cost. it is very expensive (over 00 a night)

      hopefully this helps

  27. QUESTION:
    My six year old snores loud at night and sleep like she's choking in between snores?

    • ANSWER:
      She may have obstructive sleep apnea.

      Common signs of obstructive sleep apnea include unexplained daytime sleepiness, restless sleep, and loud snoring (with periods of silence followed by gasps). Less common symptoms are morning headaches; insomnia; trouble concentrating; mood changes such as irritability, anxiety and depression; forgetfulness; increased heart rate and/or blood pressure; decreased sex drive; unexplained weight gain; increased urination and/or nocturia; frequent heartburn or Gastroesophageal reflux disease; and heavy night sweats.

  28. QUESTION:
    frequent night urination, why?
    I am a diabetic, I have sleep apnea, carpal tunnel, among other problems. I have had the frequent urination for upwards of 3 years. I just found out about the diabetes and the sleep apnea.

    • ANSWER:
      Frequent night urination is because you are diabetic. Did you speak to your Doctor about this?

  29. QUESTION:
    how soon does frequent urination/night sweats occur in early pregnancy?
    My boyfriend lives about 45 mins away and he works during the week, so I only see him on the weekends, but during my visitation we always manage to have loads of sex, no condom, he pulls out. I just got back on my birth control a month ago, and during the weekend, I make sure I take it ON TIME, but on the weekdays, i'm usually a few hours off. we had sex on the 12th,13th and 14th, then my period happened on the 14th also and lasted for a few days. It was normal and heavy. I started my new bc pack on the 17th. the following weekend we had sex on the 19th, 20 and 21. I missed a couple of pills the following monday and tuesday causing me to have a brief period that lasted for 2 days. the next weekend, we had sex the 26th, 27th and 28th(yesterday). saturday night/sunday morning I couldn't sleep because I had to use the restroom every 20 mins. When I finally did get to sleep (approximately 11 am - 2 pm, sunday) i woke up all sweaty. I haven't been to sleep since and it is now 1 am on monday. I do get the joys of experiencing terrible sleep apnea from time to time and this is one of those times.
    So, with all the information above, what's the likelihood that I'm pregnant? Also, if I were pregnant, how soon should I see frequent urination occur?

    • ANSWER:
      If you were pregnant, you wouldn't be having to go the bathroom every 20mins this early. If it was every 20mins, that usually happens somewhere in the 3rd trimester. Also, waking up sweaty, not a pregnancy symptom. Well of course, unless you a lot further along, and it's hot. I think your just paranoid. I am not going to say whether I think you are or are not pregnant. Truth is, I don't know. It's possible, and could happen since you've missed some pills. Also, with the frequent urination, are you peeing a normal pee, or is it just a little? Also, does it burn? You might have an infection. Do you have any other symptoms besides peeing alot?

  30. QUESTION:
    Central or obstructive sleep apnea?
    Recently, I've noticed that I cannot breathe at night. I was just wondering if someone would be able to distinguish if it was central or obstructive. First off, I do regularly experience sleep paralysis, however this newer sensation of not breathing is unlike that of having slight difficulty breathing with sleep paralysis. There is usually some sort of a weird sensation in my stomach area and my guess is that my diaphragm stops functioning normally. The first time I noticed this, I may have been in the midst of a sleep paralysis episode so there was a tingly sensation traveling up my spine and then pain at the base of my neck. Normally I do not experience pain with my sleep paralysis episodes, so I found this a bit odd. Also, this may seem ridiculous, but I would like to mention that my sleep paralysis is usually accompanied by hallucinations, sometimes of limbs flailing around (kind of like having a seizure) so this "not breathing" may also just be my imagination.

    I am 19 years old and weigh ~120lbs (I am 5 4 ), but I ve been steadily gaining weight for the past 5 years, so weight may or may not be a problem. I try not to sleep on my back to minimize the frequency of sleep paralysis episodes (the last two times I experienced what I suspect is sleep apnea, I was on my side, so I am led to believe that sleep paralysis is irrelevant). The softness/hardness of mattresses do not seem to affect whether or not I stop breathing (as a college student, I regularly switch between sleeping at home and on campus). Also, I am very out of touch with myself so I cannot say whether I am stressed or not and therefore how stress may be affecting me (some people find this odd, but this is how I ve been all my life). My dad has been diagnosed with sleep apnea, but we do not talk very much so I do not know a lot about it.

    Lastly, I may consider discussing this with a doctor, but spontaneous death while sleeping due to sleep apnea is somewhat infrequent. I am already becoming accustomed to this so I doubt that I will mention it to anyone who will recommend that I use a CAPA machine or take medication for my sleep paralysis.

    • ANSWER:
      You will not be able to find out if you have CSA or OSA without either a sleep Sudy or have someone actually watch your breathing. If you do not have a neurological disorder, I doubt you have Central Sleep Apnea.

      You can start a journal to get back in touch withyourselfl and personal observations. Include the following 1.snoringg, 2. apnea events that awaken you, 3. morning headaches, 4. frequent nighttime urination, 4. excessive daytime sleepiness, 6. falling sleep at inappropriate places (cars, class, social setting), and 5. if you have family history of sleep disorders.

      At some time this may be valuable to take to your doctor forassessmentt.

  31. QUESTION:
    Frequent Urination..What cud be the cause?
    I have problem of frequent urination.
    Sometimes frequency as high as every 2-3 Mins :(
    Got diagnosis test done for diabetes.Thankfully,
    I dont have diabetes.
    Additional Information :- No pain or itching during urination.
    What can be the possible cause of urination?

    • ANSWER:
      This is definatly serious. It could be a UTI, or if it is during the night, it could be due to sleep apnea. I definatly recommend getting examined by a urologist. I really recommend you do this aSAP. Don't panick. It may not be anything serious, but further examination needs to be performed. I will be praying for you.

  32. QUESTION:
    I am 45 yr old having high blood pressure,I take lisonopril 20mg and amlodipine 10 mg at night I have to get?
    up every hour at night for urination and even though some times I get wet bed problem, I dont have diabetes as of now, doctor last time I got it checked and it was 6.4, can any one tell how can I control urination problem, some times while sleep I feel my breath stops and I suddenly get up try to take long breath, some one told that its sleep apnea,but I want to know If I START TAKING MEDication in morning instead of night will it help to control urination problem,need advise

    • ANSWER:
      This is the type of question you need to ask your doctor, not us people mooching around yahoo answers at gone midnight because they can't sleep because their other half is trying to prove that he can snore and make a noise that is louder then the Red Arrows.

  33. QUESTION:
    during day time i feel depressed /sinking of heart if I dont take nap and feels drossiness why>?

    • ANSWER:
      May be you are not taking good sleep at night due to sleep apnea or due to any other reason or may be having very mild hypothyroidism.

      If you are also having problems with constipation and scanty urination or any urine related problem then you should try a homeopathic medicine called Cannabis Sativa 30C 1-2 drops daily one time for few days after consulting any local hoemopathic doctor. This would help you certainly to some extent.

      Dr. Rakesh Kumar (B.H.M.S. N.H.M.C., Reg.No-H-27028 UP HB India)
      Online Free Homeopathic Adviser
      Owner: http://homeopathy-for-all.blogspot.com

  34. QUESTION:
    Do you sleep well? What is good for sleeping well?

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  35. QUESTION:
    How can I help A Morbid Obesity man see his problem?
    I have a friend he has a great personality and heart. I enjoy being with him on a more than friendship level. He has a lot of health issues. Hypertension, swollen legs and feet, bad sleep pattern, sleep Apnea, diabetic and all that goes with Obesity. He forgets to take medication. He says he doesn't take water pill because it makes him urinate to often. He truck drives night shift 12 to 14 plus hours a day and the increase urination makes it inconvenient in both work and sleep. He is a Capricorn. I am a Pisces and it is in my character to help people. I have suggested Bypass surgery but he has a fear of that. We have discussed the Lap Band. He has an insurance that might not pay for the surgery. Please include suggestion on how to pay for the surgery cost if insurance does not cover. Thank You

    • ANSWER:
      I agree that he has to want to do it himself, and that you can help him , motivate him to some degree.
      If you follow the link above someone gave you it is 'losing it with jillian' and there is a chance there, i agree
      you all may also call around and find out if there are any doctors who donate time to do the surgery

      try jillian

      best wishes

  36. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my mom?
    Today I came home from babysitting, the bathroom door was locked an I hear snoring inside. I picked the lock and my moms laying down in the bathroom on the floor. I ask her if everything's okay she said yes. I got out of her that she is irritated with my dad but she knows she can always sleep in my bed. Now we're in bed and like in the middle of the snore she quits breathing and her body twitches and like moves weird. I asked her if she was okay and explain what she was doing and she had no idea she was doing it. I called her on the phone earlier tonight and she sounded kind of weird or like she didn't know really what our conversation is about. Do you think it's drugs a stroke or what? I know I might just be paranoid but I really sense something is wrong

    • ANSWER:
      likely your mom has sleep apnea

      You probably want to know what is sleep apnea, what causes sleep apnea and find proper treatment.

      When people falls asleep, the muscles attached to the tongue relax. If you slept on your back, the tongue intended to fall back into your throat. For a sleep apnea patient, this will be a problem since the fatty tongue will bock the breathing passage and suspend the breathing even your lung try to breathe. When no fresh air bring in oxygen to your lung, there will be no oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange. Your blood oxygen level will be low and carbon dioxide will be high. Generally if the oxygen is lower than 90%, your brain thinks something is wrong and try to wake you up. For most of sleep apnea patient, they can be wake up easily to active muscles to retract tongue from blocking breathing and resume breathing. Sometimes The brain cells controlling your feet got signal quicker and active your feet ahead of the muscles attached to your tongue and lung. For this scenario, your brain will send stronger signals to wake you up to resume breathing which could lead to your feet movement.

      you may see a sleep specialist or an ENT doctor for a sleep study.

      During sleep apnea study, they will put sensors on patient's feet to monitor the foot movement and compare with breathing. if foot movement is prior to the resume of breathing, it might indicate an apnea.

      from the symptoms you described , likely your mom have sleep apnea even though you may see other symptoms such as day time sleepness, morning headache, red light or stop doziness.

      Sleep apnea could lead to a lot of health problems such as hypertension, frequent urination heart failures, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.

      Sleep apnea is treatable. because it is a physical structural disorder, not a medical condition. unless it is caused by other medical conditions, it is not treatable by medications. it can be treated by some devices such as CPAP machine, a oral device, most popular one is Snorefighter (http://www.kudosnore.com/) and surgeries.

      suggest you to see an ENT doctor or a sleep a specialist. they may ask you for overnight hospital study. before to schedule a study please make sure your insurance covers the cost. it is very expensive (over 00 a night)

      hopefully this helps

  37. QUESTION:
    what do you do if you always have to go to the bathroom every hr you dont drink after 6pm and you go to bed at?

    • ANSWER:
      One good thing about it , you don't have to set an alarm. Wish you would have given more info. Are you diabetic. If a man I would say Prostate. A woman maybe a urinary tract infection.

      There is a proven correlation between sleep apnea and nocturia. Do you snore? Are you a big person, overweight with a short, stocky neck? Do you have excessive daytime tiredness?
      All of these, including the frequent night-time urination, are associated with sleep disorders.
      It might be worth getting checked out.
      This is from WIKI :

      Nocturia (derived from Latin nox, night, and Greek [ ] , urine), also called nycturia (Greek ), is the need to get up during the night in order to urinate, thus interrupting sleep. Its occurrence is more frequent in the elderly. Nocturia could result simply from too much liquid intake before going to bed (usually the case in the young), or it could be a symptom of a larger problem, such as sleep apnea, hyperparathyroidism[1], chronic renal failure, urinary incontinence, bladder infection, Interstitial Cystitis, diabetes, heart failure, benign prostatic hyperplasia, Ureteral Pelvic Junction Obstruction[2] or prostate cancer.

      This has been a tough one.

      I once had a uti , so I know what you are going through. Sometimes I was peeing every half hour.

      Tin

      Good luck my friend

  38. QUESTION:
    Sleeping problem question?
    what would caues you wake you middle of the night?
    Day time headoches, stomch bothering, prombler with passing urine

    • ANSWER:
      You sound like you could have sleep apnea! Sleep apnea is caused when one stops breathing while sleeping. It could cause frequent urination during the night, headaches, excessive daytime sleepiness among many other problems, but this don't necessarily mean that this is what you have. I am just going with my own experience with sleep apnea, but if you think you have this get it checked because it could later in life cause heart disease and strokes.

  39. QUESTION:
    Going to sleep just can't stay asleep. I've tried ear plugs and I still wake up. PLEASE HELP ME!!!?

    My husband snores. I just want to sleep a whole night without waking up every two hours. Even when I go sleep in another room I still wake up worried I will over sleep and be late for work.

    • ANSWER:
      Your husband may suffer from a sleep disorder called Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Spouses of those who suffer from this disorder often lose an hour or more a sleep a night due to the loud snoring or worry over their spouse not breathing during the night. This disorder is treatable and you can get a good nights rest finally!

      As for you, the lack of sleep can also be dangerous leaving you sleepy when driving or having symptoms of sleep deprivation.

      Here is an exerpt from an article from the Mayo Clinic: Investigators at the Mayo Sleep Disorders Clinic did a one night study of 10 married couples and found that the wives of men with apnea don t get a good night s sleep, which is to be expected if the partner has a snoring and waking problem.

      When the researchers monitored the sleeping couples and gave apnea sufferers nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to stop the erratic snoring, they found the spouses sleep time increased from 75 percent to 87 percent.

      In other words, with their husbands getting some corrective therapy, the wives got an extra hour of sleep a night, according to the study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

      This is the first study in which the sleep deprivation of spouses of apnea sufferers was looked at. Add this to the list of reasons it is important for someone with sleep apnea to get appropriate treatment - otherwise, both partners have a sleeping disorder. And how well your partner sleeps can be a critical component of your relationship.

      For your husband, what are the signs and symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

      Loud snoring
      Dry mouth in the morning
      Unrefreshing sleep and morning grogginess
      Headaches on awakening
      Night sweats
      Indigestion during the night
      Problems with memory and concentration
      Increased urination at night
      Daytime sleepiness
      Irritabilty and/or fatigue during the day
      Depression

      The most common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea are snoring, gasping for breath, choking, short pauses in normal breathing patterns, and sudden awakening when sleeping. During the day, he may have headaches and feel extremely drowsy because he does not sleep well at night. In severe cases, obstructive sleep apnea can eventually lead to heart failure and pulmonary complications because the lungs can t provide enough oxygen to the blood, or remove enough carbon dioxide.

      He may feel like he has slept all night or during naps, but with OSA his body is continually working in overtime to keep him breathing. When an obstruction occurs his heart rate increases to help push oxygen to his brain, his brain is telling his chest wall and abdominal wall to continue the motion of breathing to try and force the airway open. He awakens enough to take a breath and then falls back asleep where the cycle begins again.

      You are he may not recognize or have the other symptoms listed, but the only way to know if he has the sleep disorder is to contact your physician and request a sleep study.

      Your doctor will perform a sleep study. This is a painless test in which he stays overnight in a hospital or independant sleep study laboratory. Sleep labs are designed to be like hotel rooms. While he sleeps, respiratory therapists or sleep techs will monitor and register functions such as heart rate, respiratory rate, airflow, and blood oxygen levels. A audiovisual system also records snoring and body position.

      Treatment of OSA is done with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP that splits the airway open while you sleep relieving the obstruction and the symptoms of OSA, including loud snoring.

      You can get more information from http://www.sleepapnea.org/info/index.html

  40. QUESTION:
    sleeping schedule?
    on school nights i try to have at least 8 hours of sleep which i heard is the average hours you need for a good night sleep however when i wake up i am still wanting to go back to sleep. i try not to sleep for 12 hours because that is what i do on weekends and i find it harder to fall asleep early when i have slept too much the night before. how many hours do you need to sleep to feel fresh in the morning and not tired?

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  41. QUESTION:
    sleeping problems?
    lasnight i had a really bad stomache pain and irration lastnight and couldnt go to sleep.I know the reason i ate too late with greasy stuff but Ive not ate anything that greasy todayand im starting to have it agin tonight i drank milk and had some turkey and put a heating pad but none of that worked i just took some antacids from safeway i think its kinda like pepto bismol is there anything else i could do i only got 2 or 3 hrs of sleep lasnite and dont want to have to have another nite like lastnight please advise thanks i cant take anything that includes sephlesporens and aritthamiason sorry for misplelled words I'm not sure how to spell them Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  42. QUESTION:
    Herniated disc / frequent Urination?
    My boyfriend was in an accident 3 months ago and before at night he would only have to probably go once or sometimes just wait till he has to wake up. Recently it has become an urgent NEED to go. He told me he goes 3-5 times a night now. I am worried, and concerned what may be going on! He has a L-5 Herniated disc. and I have read it will make you incontinent but that somehow did not seem like the answer I was looking for. He and I are wondering what some cause may be. Please help me be more knowledge on what to look for or what may be going on or if these two things are related in any way :) thank you so much!

    • ANSWER:
      The medical term for frequent nighttime urination is "nocturia," and it can have many different causes. See for example:

      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003141.htm

      and those are just the more common causes. There are other possibilities.

      I would predict that his nocturia is coming from something else, most likely something on that list above. I can't tell you for sure that his lumbar disk issue is not contributing to his nocturia. (In fact websearching nocturia with lumbar disk herniation, I did find one medical case study with a patient who had this specific combination of issues.) But nocturia is not commonly caused by lumbar disk herniation. In fact it's more commonly caused by *cervical* disk herniation, which is bulging disk in the cervical (neck) spine as opposed to the lumbar (small of the lower back) spine. You are correct when you say that lumbar disk herniation is a known cause of incontinence (though not with the majority of people with disk herniation), but that doesn't mean it also causes nocturia. Urinary incontinence is a different problem; incontinence is not a worse form of nocturia as you might assume.

      Does he ever snore loudly or gasp for air when asleep, waking himself up for a few seconds? He might have sleep apnea which does cause nocturia.

      A doctor's exam can check him for benign prostatic hypertrophy or BPH, a very common male ailment.

      It is also possible that the nocturia is related to something else that happened in the accident besides the disk herniation.

      Might be time for a checkup to investigate the cause of his nocturia. I think the biggest problem for nocturia is that the patient (and bedmate perhaps) don't get enough REM sleep with the extra trips to the john. Other than that, it's not particularly dangerous in itself. Still, it's worth getting checked out in case something of greater concern such as sleep apnea is behind this.

      Good luck. I hope you guys get it figured out soon and he and you can be sleeping better.

  43. QUESTION:
    I can't sleep and I'm sleepy!!?
    Ok,for the last 5 years I remember always having bad sleeping habit.I find it extremely hard to fall asleep on my own.I can stay up and stare at the walls untill 5 hours later I decided to give up..I usually last 4 days like this untill I "pass out" and stay in bed for 18 hours.I know it's not normal and through out the years I'm kinda gotten used to it. I do have some trick and I was wondering what helps you to relaz and fall asleep? (reading and watching tv don't work for me,it just keeps me awake)

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  44. QUESTION:
    does anyone know some home remedies for insomnia? ( sleep disorder)?

    • ANSWER:
      1. Emotional Distress

      More particularly when it is from internalized anxiety or anger, emotional problems can easily trigger this sleep disorder.

      2. Substance Abuse

      Drinking too much coffee, colas or other "energy-upper drinks" is known to cause insomnia. Caffeine from these drinks is the main reason.

      Chain smokers can also be easy victims of insomnia because of the nicotine that cigarettes contain.

      Herbal remedies, alcohol and other medications can also make one prone to becoming an insomniac.

      Some may think that alcohol, when consumed, can make one feel drowsy. But little did they know that in the long run, when the alcohol gets metabolized, sudden wakefulness will follow.

      3. Biological Clock Disturbance.

      Also known as circadian rhythm, one's body clock, when altered, can damage the amount of sleep one can peacefully enjoy.

      This body clock disturbance can be caused by an irregular slumber schedule because of too much siesta or partying too late at night.

      It can also be jetlag or body clock disturbance due to traveling by plane to some place where there is a different time zone.

      Other causes may be the grave yard schedules of workers and cramming review season for students induced by exams.

      4. Environmental Factors

      Extreme temperatures can disrupt one's sleeping patterns. Noise and bright lights can have the same effect too. Homesickness or when one is forced to sleep in an unfamiliar place is also one reason behind getting into the habit of not having enough sleep.

      5. Health Problems

      Health disorders such as diabetes, heart failure, hyperthyroidism, ulcers, and Parkinson's disease can also induce insomnia.

      Asthma may also be one health problem that makes one prone to insomnia because of an asthmatic's shortness of breath.

      Frequent urination, heartburn, and chronic pain from leg cramps, tooth ache and arthritis can also cause insomnia.

      Psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression are also possible culprits for insomnia. Snoring with prolonged pauses in breathing while at sleep, also known as sleep apnea can also cause insomnia.

      Periodic arm and leg movements during sleep causing the muscles to twitch excessively is one underlying cause of this sleep disorder.

      Another cause is narcolepsy or one's lack of control on whether to stay awake or to fall asleep, is another cause of this sleep disorder.

      6. Pre-bedtime Activities

      Engaging to vigorous activities such as exercise just right before bedtime can deprive one of a good night's sleep. Consuming large meals when one is just about to sleep can also make one experience this sleeping disorder

      This is because when metabolism is at its most active thus the body prompts one to stay awake.

      Who are Prone to Insomnia?

      Reports have it that 90% of people can acquire transient insomnia at some point in their lives. While an estimate of 30% suffers from its chronic form.

      a. Women are said to be more at risk in acquiring insomnia because of the following reasons:

      - Pre-menstrual syndrome with symptoms of irritability, depression and anxiety, and bloating due to menstruation disturbs a woman's sleeping pattern.

      - Menopause can also change a woman's sleeping pattern.

      - Pregnancy makes sleeplessness one common thing to happen.

      b. Elderly people are also prone to getting insomnia because ageing alters one's sleeping patterns.

      c. Depressed people have lighter slumbers compared to those who don't feel this psychological condition.

      d. Students or younger ones who are conscious with their grades (because of cramming) can easily become insomniacs too.

  45. QUESTION:
    Can't sleep!!! Should I take OTC sleeping pills?
    I've been having terrible times falling asleep since I took a second night job at a newspaper... I am the person designing the front few pages and it always comes down to the wire. After we make deadline (10:30 pm), I am filled with adrenaline.... so much so that I can't sleep at all!

    I toss and turn at night... I stopped drinking all caffeine thinking that would help, but it hasn't done a thing.

    Right now it is 5 am. I have been yawning since 11 pm. I need to be up at my regular job at 9 a.m. Most days I have been falling asleep around 4 or 5 am and oversleeping.

    Do I need to see the doctor or should I try something over the counter...? I've always been having restless leg syndrome (I assumed from the stress) but I tried the soap trick (look it up!) and it really seems to have helped a bit but I still have tingly feet.
    I can't quit the second job - I need it for medical bills (I had back surgery in December, which was very successful, knock on wood). Also it gives me more experience for my regular day job (also in journalism).

    I try to go to bed at the same time every night but I just end up laying there. It looks like tonight I won't be able to sleep at all - it's already 6 am :-( :-( :-(

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  46. QUESTION:
    hi there, am 32 and during the night i can't sleep am up every 1 1/2 hr. to urinate. doing the day am fine.

    • ANSWER:
      It's called Nocturia. Normally, urine decreases in amount and become more concentrated at night. That means, most people can sleep 6 to 8 hours without having to urinate, but, persons with nocturia get up more than once during the night to urinate. Because of this, those who have excessive urination at night often have disrupted sleep cycles.

      Some Causes Include:

      Drinking too much fluid before bedtime -- particularly coffee, caffeinated beverages, or alcohol
      Benign prostatic hyperplasia
      Diabetes
      Chronic or recurrent urinary tract infection
      Chronic renal failure
      Congestive heart failure
      Cystitis (acute urinary tract infection)
      Drugs such as diuretics, cardiac glycosides, demeclocycline, lithium, methoxyflurane, phenytoin, propoxyphene, and excessive vitamin D
      Obstructive sleep apnea

      Contact your doctor if excessive nighttime urination continues over several days, and is not explained by medications or increase of fluids before bedtime or if you are bothered by the number of times you must urinate during the night.

  47. QUESTION:
    Frequent urination before falling asleep.?
    I am a 30 year old male in good physical health with only these symptoms.
    -I feel the urge to urinate whenever I lay down to go to bed.
    -I may go twice or ten times.
    -I have normal urination during the day.
    -I can lay down for a nap during the day without said symptoms.
    -I do not have decreased "flow" during that day.
    -The amount I urinate at night is a very small amount each time I go.
    -I do not wake up to go after I fall asleep.
    -I have had these issues since I was a teenager. I have had days where I have not had to go at all, but they are few and far between.

    Any help would be much appreciated. Please point me in the right direction for some treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      There are many reasons for Nocturia
      Chronic bladder infection
      Diabetes
      Drinking too much fluid before bedtime, particularly coffee, caffeinated beverages, or alcohol
      High blood calcium level
      Certain medications
      Obstructive sleep apnea and other sleeping disorders
      You can seek help through your doctor for further investigating.

  48. QUESTION:
    tiredness?
    I get about 8 or 9, sometimes 10 hours of sleep at night, yet during the day I feel tired and very sleepy where I can just lay down and go to sleep instant. I wake up a lot in the middle of the night though, I wake up and roll around in my bed about every hour, every single night, could it be my mattress or what, that's making me roll around and making me tired throughout the day?
    I exercise daily and no i don't drink alcohol.

    • ANSWER:
      Please keep in mind that this answer is for information purposes only, and is not intended to diagnose, treat or replace sound medical advice from your physician or health care provider.

      This is only personal opinion and was written to cater to general audiences. Not responsible for any side effect of this advice, i.e. getting sleepy. This advice assumed that you have undergo medical check up and do not have any clinical problem, i.e. Apnea, Hyperactive, Hyperthyroidism, etc.

      Problem sleeping can be caused by many reasons. If this happen quite persistent i.e. >2 times a week, you may have sleep disorder. Refer to sleep disorder link below for information, then consult your doctor.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_disorder

      Other reason, (but unlikely since I presume you are average age):- Hyperactive (young), Hyperthyroidism (burning feeling, hand tremble) - sometimes thyroid gland produces too much hormones (old) :-

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperactive

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthyroidism

      Sleep disorder can cause other long terms health related issues:-

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB9dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5ajBtczZqBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=124pebnfc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/diabetes.html

      http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro01/web3/Ledoux.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB8dpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5NGJlZnR1BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1375o7a0t/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.healthrelatedinfos.com/2007/02/10/no-sleep-means-no-new-brain-cells.html

      http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0oGkwky5JVHiTwB.9pXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE5OHI5OGk2BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkA1lTNzBfMTEyBGwDV1Mx/SIG=1293is0uc/EXP=1201092018/**http%3a//www.touchbriefings.com/pdf/790/23-pascualy.pdf

      If you are having normal sleep disorder, you can try the following method:-

      1. Avoid watching TV, eating, and discussing emotional issues in bed. The bed should be used for sleep and sex only. If not, we can associate the bed with other activities and it often becomes difficult to fall asleep.

      2. Minimize noise, light, and temperature extremes during sleep with ear plugs, window blinds, or an electric blanket or air conditioner. Even the slightest nighttime noises or luminescent lights can disrupt the quality of your sleep. Try to keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature -- not too hot (above 75 degrees) or too cold (below 54 degrees).

      3. Try not to drink fluids after 8 p.m. This may reduce awakenings due to urination. (Frequent night urination must be check for prostate/diabetes problem)

      4. Avoid naps, but if you do nap, make it no more than about 25 minutes about eight hours after you awake. But if you have problems falling asleep, then no naps for you.

      5. Do not expose your self to bright light if you need to get up at night. Use a small night-light instead.

      6. Nicotine is a stimulant and should be avoided particularly near bedtime and upon night awakenings. Having a smoke before bed, although it may feel relaxing, is actually putting a stimulant into your bloodstream.

      7. Caffeine is also a stimulant and is present in coffee (100-200 mg), soda (50-75 mg), tea (50-75 mg), and various over-the-counter medications. Caffeine should be discontinued at least four to six hours before bedtime. If you consume large amounts of caffeine and you cut your self off too quickly, beware; you may get headaches that could keep you awake.

      8. Although alcohol is a depressant and may help you fall asleep, the subsequent metabolism that clears it from your body when you are sleeping causes a withdrawal syndrome. This withdrawal causes awakenings and is often associated with nightmares and sweats.

      9. A light snack may be sleep-inducing, but a heavy meal too close to bedtime interferes with sleep. Stay away from protein and stick to carbohydrates or dairy products. Milk contains the amino acid L-tryptophan, which has been shown in research to help people go to sleep. So milk and cookies or crackers (without chocolate) may be useful and taste good as well.

      10. Do not exercise vigorously just before bed, if you are the type of person who is aroused by exercise. If this is the case, it may be best to exercise in the morning or afternoon (preferably an aerobic workout, like running or walking).

      11. Does your pet sleep with you? This, too, may cause arousals from either allergies or their movements in the bed. Thus, Fido and Kitty may be better off on the floor than on your sheets.

      Sources: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20071216183546AA2SYIY

  49. QUESTION:
    Is this nomal to pee this much?
    I think I have an overactive bladder or something... I always wake up 2-4 times a night to use the bathroom... Is this normal? How many times waking up a night to use the bathroom IS normal? And a lot of times as soon as I've gone to the bathroom, I have to go again... This is sooo annoying when I'm at school, and I have to get up and use the bathroom at the end of each class and I'm late for my next one.... or when I'm at my friend's house or at a slumber party I have to get up out of bed and pee... I hate it, what's going on???? How many times a day is it normal to pee? and at night?

    • ANSWER:
      Getting up to go to the bathroom during the night is called nocturia, and it's not normal, although sometimes the cause is simple enough. If you drink a lot of fluids before going to bed, you may wake up to use the toilet one or more times. Other possible causes (in no particular order):

      1. A urinary tract infection, especially if it burns when you pee.
      2. Diabetes mellitus, especially if you are constantly thirsty as well.
      3. An overactive bladder, which makes you sensitive to even small amounts of fluid in your bladder.
      4. Diabetes insipidus (rare).
      5. Depression.
      6. Nervousness.
      7. Cold weather.
      8. Drinking or eating diuretic things, such as caffeine (Coca-Cola).
      9. Drinking lots of anything before bedtime.
      10. Poor sleep habits, in which you never really get a good sleep and often wake up.
      11. Sleep apnea.

      There are other causes.

      Do you also drink a lot of water or other fluids? Do you pee a lot each time, or only a little bit? Does it burn? Do you sometimes feel that you have to go RIGHT NOW or wet yourself, or is it not too difficult to hold it? How long have you been this way?

      Normal urination frequency during the day varies between 1.5 hours and 5 hours, with 3 hours being about average. During the night, urine production normally falls, so it's normal to sleep 6-7 hours without having to urinate. But this depends on many factors. Usually you will urinate slightly less fluid than you take in. In hot weather, you may hardly urinate at all despite drinking lots of water, and in cold weather, sometimes even drinking a glass or two of water might make you go.

      An important thing to do is to check with your doctor to make sure you don't have diabetes (chronically high blood glucose, which can cause a lot of problems if you let it go on for years or if it gets really bad) or a urinary tract infection, or other problems. If nothing can be found, then maybe you just go a lot.

  50. QUESTION:
    by dad's got a very bad snoring problem?
    he snores wakes us up sometimes, never wakes up himself, he wakes up with head aches and just plain feels like crap, so he has to nap 2-3 hours each day, i guess the snoring cuts his breathing alot, he tried that mouth guard that opens air ways but hes stubborn and refuses to use it because its uncomfortable, is there any thing else we can try?

    • ANSWER:
      He needs a professional to evaluate him for sleep apnea.

      Major Signs and Symptoms

      One of the most common signs of obstructive sleep apnea is loud and chronic (ongoing) snoring. Pauses may occur in the snoring. Choking or gasping may follow the pauses.

      The snoring usually is loudest when you sleep on your back; it may be less noisy when you turn on your side. Snoring may not happen every night. Over time, the snoring may happen more often and get louder.

      You're asleep when the snoring or gasping occurs. You will likely not know that you're having problems breathing or be able to judge how severe the problem is. Your family members or bed partner will often notice these problems before you do.

      Not everyone who snores has sleep apnea.

      Another common sign of sleep apnea is fighting sleepiness during the day, at work, or while driving. You may find yourself rapidly falling asleep during the quiet moments of the day when you're not active.
      Other Signs and Symptoms

      Others signs and symptoms of sleep apnea may include:

      * Morning headaches
      * Memory or learning problems and not being able to concentrate
      * Feeling irritable, depressed, or having mood swings or personality changes
      * Urination at night
      * A dry throat when you wake up

sleep apnea urination night